Remote Surf Travel First Aid Kit

Stu Nettle
The Depth Test

I've got a mate who loves to play the Lotto. Not so long ago he roped me into a syndicate on the promise of a big win. But when I told him my numbers he shook his head.

"You can't pick 17," he said with the certainty of a gambler. "History shows that number has come up fewer times than any other ball".

Clearly he knew his history, but my mate knew nothing about probability, 'cos if he did he'd know that fewer past appearances actually increase the odds of a future event happening.

While packing for a surf trip last month I was struck by a different version of the same argument. I'd never really hurt myself while on a surf trip, yet I'd been on a few, was it time for my number to come up?

With this in mind I walked to the chemist to fill my first aid kit. But with what? Twenty band-aids, a tube of Savlon, and a safety pin..? I'd never needed much else before.

As it happened I didn't need much that trip either - which takes me one trip closer to that dreaded number 17. But fortunately a package arrived in the post this week: The Remote Surf Travel First Aid Kit - marketed as the Calm As First Aid Kit.

The Calm As Kit has everything a travelling surfer needs, as collated by a bloke who knows. Dr Jon Cohen is an emergency surgeon and self-confessed frother, he's considered everything from sea urchin spike to the accidents that don't bear thinking about, and he's assembled a kit to deal with them all.

The kit is split into six smaller resealable packs, each labelled and divvied up for various injuries ("Reef Rash" "Urchins" "Dressings"). The whole lot then sits inside a water-resistant drawstring bag with a combined weight of 0.65kg. Bung it in your backpack and you'd hardly know it's there.

The Calm As Kit includes:

  • 10 alco wipes
  • 10 packs of gauze
  • 10 non-sterile emergency nitrile gloves
  • 5 x betadine wipes
  • 5 x30mL packs of sterile saline for wound irrigation
  • Sterile scissors
  • Sterile tissue forceps
  • 2 sterile packs of small wound closure strips (“steristrips”)
  • 2 sterile packs of extra large wound closure strips
  • 2 sterile 10mL syringes
  • 2 sterile 18G blunt needles
  • Sterile cotton applicators (“Q-tips”)
  • Triangular bandage (“Shoulder sling”)
  • 1.5m of flat-packed 3.75cm strapping tape
  • 50cm x10cm sheet of breathable fabric wound dressing (“fixomul”)
  • 2x medium water-proof transparent wound dressings (6x7cm)
  • 2x large water-proof transparent wound dressings (10x12cm)
  • 2x medium combines with waterproof backing (10x20cm)
  • 2x large combines with waterproof backing (20x20cm)
  • 2x tongue depressors (“finger splints”)
  • 5x fabric bandaids
  • 25g tube of Burnaid gel
  • Aeroform Snakebite bandage (doubles as a “tensor bandage”)

As far as I'm aware this is the first commercially available surfer's first aid kit. And while it's comprehensive, Dr Cohen is looking to make continual improvements on it over the coming years. Surfers have always copped the occasional injury while on the road, and as more of us travel further, the odds are the incidents will increase.

The Calm As First Ais Kit can be bought online for $79.95.

Comments

ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 10:43am

>>Clearly he knew his history, but my mate knew nothing about probability, 'cos if he did he'd know that fewer past appearances actually increase the odds of a future event happening.

brilliant stu :))) good to see some real science

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:08am

Probability theory isn't my strongest suit, but I'd contest that. The results of a past lotto draw and a future one aren't causally linked, so the amount of times number 17 has been drawn in the past can have no bearing on the probability of it being drawn in the future.

OHV500's picture
OHV500's picture
OHV500 commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:36am

Totally correct Pops - Just referencing my memory of permutations and combinations in Form 6 maths :))

kaybeegee's picture
kaybeegee's picture
kaybeegee commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:58am

Yep, Keep Stu off the roulette table.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:00pm

So my mate was also wrong?

If so, that's enough consolation for me.

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:05pm

Yep, you're both wrong for the same reason.

ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:28pm

the real lesson here - don’t try to make a joke on the internet

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:30pm

Jokes are fine. Mathematics is the problem.

ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:33pm

that just doesn’t add up ...

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 1:20pm

Yeah, I feel like a bit of a dick for the correction.

ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko's picture
ojackojacko commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 1:32pm

all good pops - just some friendly banter

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 1:36pm

Always hard to gauge tone via text!

blackers's picture
blackers's picture
blackers commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 1:50pm

Dont worry about it Pops, you saved me from correcting him. My gran always said never miss an opportunity. Peace and love all, go get some waves.

Ralph's picture
Ralph's picture
Ralph commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 5:31pm

"amount of times number 17 has been drawn in the past can have no bearing on the probability of it being drawn in the future"
Thats my understanding too. Do you know how that reconciles to the concept of "reversion to the mean"?

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 1:47pm

This example from the Wiki page on the topic explains it quite well (yeah, I know wiki isn't always the best source, but it tends to be pretty good on things like maths);
"Consider a simple example: a class of students takes a 100-item true/false test on a subject. Suppose that all students choose randomly on all questions. Then, each student’s score would be a realization of one of a set of independent and identically distributed random variables, with an expected mean of 50. Naturally, some students will score substantially above 50 and some substantially below 50 just by chance. If one takes only the top scoring 10% of the students and gives them a second test on which they again choose randomly on all items, the mean score would again be expected to be close to 50. Thus the mean of these students would “regress” all the way back to the mean of all students who took the original test. No matter what a student scores on the original test, the best prediction of their score on the second test is 50. "

Ralph's picture
Ralph's picture
Ralph commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 3:16pm

Thanks Pops, that's a good example.

Chipper's picture
Chipper's picture
Chipper commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:03am

Well packaged and looks like a good kit.

But where's the "China Red" ..... and the Bactroban, antibiotic cream for skin infections. Cannot recommend those 2 items enough!

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:07am

Doc Jon said the while the kit is comprehensive, it can also be used as a base for a fully kitted out kit. The bag it comes in has plenty of room to "add in your other medical goodies like tablets, potions and snake-oil."

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:10am

Yep looks pretty comprehensive. Probably worth grabbing one to keep in the car.

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:09pm

And the half limes for Tahitian reef rash?

Don't let the bastards grind you down

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 12:32pm

Two days after I got home last month...

Next time more lime and more scrubbing.

derra83's picture
derra83's picture
derra83 commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 2:30pm

Whats with the black line?

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 2:42pm

Demarcation. Doc already had me on antibiotics but he said if the red extends beyond the texta line then the scorched earth campaign would begin.

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 3:02pm

Checking if the infection is growing or shrinking, yeah?
FWIW, I've found manuka honey the best for those kinds of infections. Needs to be decently strong stuff, mind.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 3:07pm

Yep. By this stage he was worried about the infection going into my shin bone. The doc is usually all for natural remedies but he was prepared to call up Blackwater in this case.

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 3:11pm

Heavy.

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 3:09pm

Well seeing you posted that Stu, wanna see a pic of my finger post-planer? It's pretty gruesome...

Don't let the bastards grind you down

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 3:10pm

Stick it up...

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:10pm

Let's see if this works...

Don't let the bastards grind you down

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:11pm

Apologies to anyone who's squeamish.

Don't let the bastards grind you down

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:19pm

Sheesh. Apology accepted. How'd that one heal?

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:50pm

Still healing Pops. Four weeks out of the water and counting. Hopefully it won't be much longer, given that the autumn swell patterns are starting to form down off Heard Island and I am, as my handle would seem to indicate, even more surfstarved than usual.

Plus I've got a board to glass and I haven't been able to wear gloves for over a month now.

Don't let the bastards grind you down

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:58pm

Gawdsheesh....bet you never make that mistake again!

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 6:12pm

I fucken hope not.

Don't let the bastards grind you down

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 8:33pm

Bragging rights surfstaved

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 1:38pm

Hope you heal up quick mate!

AndyM's picture
AndyM's picture
AndyM commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 5:05pm

Oh man, that's so fucked!

You didn't do things by halves!

blindboy's picture
blindboy's picture
blindboy commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 3:12pm

First trip,to Bali bloke in the same losmen hit the reef hard with his elbow and took some skin off. He didn't look after it and it got infected. Woke up a couple of days later with an arm the same diameter as his leg. The doctor at the Bali beach stuffed him full of sntibiotics and we dressed him up with his arm hidden so they would let him on the plane. He had fractured his humerus (I think) and the infection had entered the bone. Ended up losing 30% of the bone and had a metal plate put in. Look after your cuts kiddies!

Laurie McGinness

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:21pm

Good comment Chippa. Topical antibiotics are crucial to preventing minor infection from spreading. Even more important is preventing the infection from starting - this kit has all the sterile gear to pick the little bits of sealife out, sterile saline for a final rinse after you've diluted the bacteria in the wound with fresh / drinking water, and betadine wipes to dab on the wound after you've stopped all bleeding. Close it and cover it with the other gear in here, and you may never need bactroban, limes, betadine or savlon (my favourite 'cause it doesn't stain anything, doesn't sting and seems to work). But yea, I always pack a tube of savlon for the times when something gets left in the wound and it starts to turn a day or two later...

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 1:29pm

Agree Bactroban for sure also for any Cardiac problems Aspirin 100mg and
Nitrolingual pump spray which is avail without prescription .
Lime on Reef cuts have been a no no for 10 yrs or more...

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:24pm

Good point Udo - anyone with pre-existing medical conditions should be sure to have an ample supply of their meds with them. Even at Joyo's Camp at G-Land where Surfing Doctors have been manning / stocking an infirmary for the past decade, the only way to be 100% that the meds you need are in date and accessible (medication cupboards have been known to be ransacked...) is to have your own. Especially if it's something your life / ability to surf comfortably depends on.

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 8:37pm

Hey Udo why no lime still used most of outer Indo

blindboy's picture
blindboy's picture
blindboy commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:49am

Probably cheaper than assembling it yourself!

Laurie McGinness

filthyphil's picture
filthyphil's picture
filthyphil commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 11:53am
Island Bay's picture
Island Bay's picture
Island Bay commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 2:18pm

Looks good.
I'd add Bactroban, suture and needles.

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:33pm

Most medically trained crew I know bring at least a set of sutures, suture equipment and the gear to instill local anaesthetic. We couldn't provide local anaesthetic so trimmed the suturing gear (pretty exy and less likely to be used) from this version of the kit. This kit has enough "steri strips" or butterfly bandages to close a wound until you can get somewhere with medical backup. Also water resistant "combines" and a tensor bandage that will help arrest bleeding, and mop up any slow trickle from the wound while you're travelling to get help. This feature of the kit is just as helpful at your local as it is overseas - heaps of crew come into the Emergency Department straight from the beach with blood soaking through their (or their mates') clothes from using them as compression bandages. I'm sure some of their cars looked like murder scenes.

loungelizard's picture
loungelizard's picture
loungelizard commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 2:23pm

agree with island bay and try to score a 5 day course of broad spectrum antibiotic from a friendly doc and start munching them before your leg starts to look like stu's (nasty..)

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:38pm

Agree with you about the antibiotics, but not so much about the "broad spectrum" side of things. You can choose tailored AB's for what you're likely to need them for. The (included) eBook / app we're launching is going to touch on subjects like this in a bit more detail for those who are interested. Providing medications in this kit was problematic, but depending on where you're going and what you're doing there are definitely some "extra" over the counter and prescription meds you should talk to your doctor about getting before heading off...

loungelizard's picture
loungelizard's picture
loungelizard commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:49pm

not a clinician but my understanding is you can get some pretty weird bugs from coral cuts ?

dazzler's picture
dazzler's picture
dazzler commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 8:48pm

I go the my GP and a course of antibiotics for reef / fin cuts. I think it is “Keflex”.

Also throw in the antiseptic powder, great for drying out cuts.

A small tub of sudocream (nappy rash cream) is great for treating boing boing.

Garryh's picture
Garryh's picture
Garryh commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 2:54pm

Must include Medical Grade Super glue (for "suturing up cuts") and a scrubbing brush for cleaning wounds

WinterSwells

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 21 Mar 2019 at 7:09pm

Histacryl / medical glue can be a good option to have on a surftrip.
Disadvantages are that it's expensive, single use / vial, and it can break down if you get it wet in the first couple of days as opposed to staples or sutures.

Ape Anonymous's picture
Ape Anonymous's picture
Ape Anonymous commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:42pm

Condoms?

surfstarved's picture
surfstarved's picture
surfstarved commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 4:51pm

Or at least some strong clip-lock bags and a few rubber bands.

Don't let the bastards grind you down

VicRhino's picture
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VicRhino commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 6:21pm

It’s not a holiday if I don’t end up requiring some type of medical assistance. Always get travel insurance...

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Friday, 5 Apr 2019 at 11:09am

Good point Vic, and also make sure they cover sporting injuries!

redmondo's picture
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redmondo commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 8:28pm

The red wetsuit man photo is a beauty.

filthyphil's picture
filthyphil's picture
filthyphil commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 8:55pm

Udo I see lime used all the time. Why would it not be used anymore?

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 9:11pm

To harsh and cause more damage to the wound.

mattlock's picture
mattlock's picture
mattlock commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 9:14pm

Don't forget the Anusol for the older fellas.

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Thursday, 14 Mar 2019 at 9:18pm

Local anesthetic in that stuff works great on rashes.

MRsinglefin's picture
MRsinglefin's picture
MRsinglefin commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 11:27am

Its always a plus to have a doctor or two on your boat trips to the Metts

The MIDdleman.'s picture
The MIDdleman.'s picture
The MIDdleman. commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 11:30am

No mention of dettol...which is close companion of mine when about.

I'd be down a few extremities had I not had it once or twice.

Signature.

Bnkref's picture
Bnkref's picture
Bnkref commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 7:28pm

Have heard mixed things about the red Chinese medicine stuff. Anyone on here medically trained and know whether it’s worth having or avoiding?

mundies's picture
mundies's picture
mundies commented Monday, 18 Mar 2019 at 8:41pm

Tieh Ta Yao Gin. I have no medical background related to the use of this but have used it for 25+ years and it's the best thing I've used for stopping coral cuts from going skanky and septic. Apparently you have drink and gargle it, but I've only ever used it topically.
The thing about it having mercury/mercurochrome in it... It's herbal (made from 8 Chinese herbs apparently) but that doesn't preclude it from having anything harmful in it. I've never noticed any side effects and it's done the job I've asked of it pretty well. Mind you, a bottle can last me a handful of years at least, its probably 50ml.
Blindboy had some input on this topic in 2014:
https://www.swellnet.com/forums/wax/198736?page=1

mundies

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 8:09pm

Mercurochrome/ Mercury content high ?
Mercury build up in the body.
Dr Dave Jenkins says....why risk using it.

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 8:28pm

Used Mercurochrome by the gallon surfing the NW in the 80's worked unbelievably well ...........might also explain a few things.

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 8:33pm

He he same here..then went over to Gentian Violet...

Distracted's picture
Distracted's picture
Distracted commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 8:02pm

Don’t forget the Aquaear and 3B cream for the rashes.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 8:37pm

+1 for taking Aqua Ear.

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 21 Mar 2019 at 7:14pm

Outer ear infections are super common when on tropical trips.
The go-to treatment in ED for this condition is something like sofradex that covers bacteria, fungus and has an anti-inflammatory to help with symptoms. You'll need a prescription in Oz, but I got some over the counter in Mexico on a trip when I was underprepared. Definitely not for use if you've popped the drum (can happen pretty easily if you wipe out and your ear smacks flat against the water), and won't help at all for middle ear infections.

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Friday, 15 Mar 2019 at 8:43pm

How about pain relief...Panadine Forte a must and always a couple of Oxycontin in the kit

Feralkook's picture
Feralkook's picture
Feralkook commented Sunday, 17 Mar 2019 at 4:38pm

I would add a couple of things to that kit.
Tablets in case you get a bug.
Some sachets of hydrolyte.
Toothbrush (soft) cut down handle for debriding wounds.
Some quick clot gauze and an Olaes bandage or SWAT stretch tourniquet, I like the latter as they are easy to apply under stress, they stretch and tuck and have guide marks that change shape to tell the applicator wether it has been applied as compression only or as a full tourniquet.

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 21 Mar 2019 at 7:28pm

Good post Feralkook.
I take advantage of being a doc and bring antibiotics with me for sure.

Hydrolyte's good to have - I bring my favourite sports drink tabs 'cause they're palatable enough to use even if you aren't sick, just to top up your electrolytes / keep you hydrated during long days in the water.

I'm not a huge toothbrush for wound cleaning guy, but I have some other medical friends who are. Brushing hurts if you don't have local anaesthetic, and causes trauma to the underlying tissues. With non-purpose built scrubs like toothbrushes, you have the added problem of potentially leaving some bristles behind in the wound - the exact opposite of what you're trying to achieve by scrubbing. My approach is copious irrigation, pick out the obvious bits with the sterile forceps (tweezers) in this kit, and if you need to scrub gently you can use saline soaked gauze, which is also in the kit.
The eBook that comes with the kits has brief summaries as well as more detailed explanations on how to use the gear in the kit to sort out all of these scenarios like a a paramedic / Surfing Doctor would.

I couldn't agree more about the SWAT Tourniquet - even though it's not commonly used in Emergency Departments (or the military) yet, as a surfer it's my hands-down favourite - cheap, compact, no hard parts. You can add one to the Calm As kit - they're on sale at the same website listed in the article so ship free with the kit:
https://bettersurf.com.au/shop/tourniquets/swat-t/

udo's picture
udo's picture
udo commented Sunday, 17 Mar 2019 at 5:40pm

Yunnan Baiyao - any one used this Chinese Medicine
Supposed to be best Coagulant ?

rj-davey's picture
rj-davey's picture
rj-davey commented Monday, 18 Mar 2019 at 7:18pm

I've always been a fan of Mercurochrome. Dries it out really well. Why is it frowned upon?

Biggest issue I find is not so much cleaning/patching wounds up, but keeping them patched up/dryish while you keep surfing for the balance of the trip, cos realistically no one really stays out of the water.

Then I hear mixed things on how bad sea water is for open cuts. Some say its teaming with bacteria just waiting to give you an infection, while I have heard others say so long as you are out to sea a bit and away from say rocks the water is quite clean.

I dunno. Just keep surfing and dry it out each night with mercurochrome seems to work okay. I second the super-glue too.

gavanclark's picture
gavanclark's picture
gavanclark commented Monday, 18 Mar 2019 at 7:46pm

I use Betadine on cuts and reef grazes. Clean out the wound throughly with clean water, swab with Betadine and then Fixmull or Hyperfix. Leave this on as it heal underneath it. Only use the Betadine once, it will kill off the bugs but if you keep using it it will kill the new cells coming through.
We use this procedure at the Billabong Pro in Tahiti.
PS. If you want to experience unneeded pain use Lime, all your mates will enjoy it :-)
Cheers
Gav (WSL Event Paramedic)

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Thursday, 21 Mar 2019 at 7:32pm

Agreed rj-davey - once you've cleaned it, biggest issue is keeping that cleanness in and the bacteria out. The kit has 3 types of dressings for different types of wounds, all of which stay on in the surf.

As for sea water - like our skin, even if it's super clean it still has bacteria in it.
The problem with sea water is that it has a few bugs that don't mind setting up shop in human cuts, and the antibiotics that we would usually put people on with infected skin / wounds won't always work on these bugs. If you ever have a cut that's gone mank be sure your doctor knows you were in saltwater with the open wound.

gavanclark's picture
gavanclark's picture
gavanclark commented Monday, 18 Mar 2019 at 7:36pm

Most importantly if you are going remote like the Mentawais do your homework and pick a good boat with a first aid trained surf guide.
Pay peanuts and you will end up on a shit boat and a long way from medical help :-(
We train The Perfect Wave and World Surfaris surf guides and many of the long established boat operators in full First Aid/CPR and Surfer Rescue and supply them with Floatable Spine Boards and Defibrillators, what has your boat got ???
Gav Clark
Ex Paramedic / Instructor
Aable Training Aus

Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Calm As...'s picture
Jon Cohen-_-Cal... commented Friday, 5 Apr 2019 at 11:14am

Good point Gav,
A few other options with medical backup include Joyo's at G-Land, and Macaroni's Resort in the Ments, both of which roster a member of the Surfing Doctors to be on site during the season. Surfing doctors oversee the stocking of the medical infirmary at both camps, and thus have a bunch of "doctor only" medication to use when things get really hairy.

Bnkref's picture
Bnkref's picture
Bnkref commented Thursday, 11 Jul 2019 at 3:10pm

I've just had one of the kits delivered for an upcoming Indo jaunt. It's a handy size. Not much bigger than 2-3 magazines stacked on top of one another and it's light.

Hopefully don't have to use it...

$80 including (free) postage. Seems like a good price.