Australia - you're standing in it

Sheepdog's picture
Sheepdog started the topic in Friday, 18 Sep 2020 at 11:51am

The "I can't believe it's not politics" thread.

Supafreak's picture
Supafreak's picture
Supafreak Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 5:21am

1-BEA3313-406-F-4-F8-D-8-B27-5-C71-A7813431 Also goes by the name ‘ dozer ‘

Constance B Gibson's picture
Constance B Gibson's picture
Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 9:35am

From the previous Bernard Keane article:

"This Australian version of the Big Lie is the first stage of a war for the future of the federal Liberal Party, with the far-right unable to resist the opportunity to exploit the removal of so many more moderate MPs to drive the federal party away from climate action and towards culture wars, division and attacks on women and minorities.

At the centre of it will be the foreign political party News Corp. Despite its irrelevance to mainstream Australia being demonstrated by the election result, the Murdochs will continue to wield significant influence within a purged Coalition, and the company will seize on its status as an opposition party. From yesterday, the Murdoch campaign of regime change in Australia began — it’s just that the campaign extends to the Coalition as well as a Labor government.

This shouldn’t be treated as some sort of sideshow. When Tony Abbott defeated Malcolm Turnbull in 2009 by one vote, with the backing of News Corp, he set the stage for 13 years of climate wars and polarised, toxic politics. He was aided by Kevin Rudd’s failure to seize the moment and go to an election that would have smashed the Coalition. One mistake is all it takes and the course of political history can be very different.

The Big Lie, Australian style, is just the start."

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 10:10am

“At the centre of it will be the foreign political party News Corp. Despite its irrelevance to mainstream Australia being demonstrated by the election result, “

Well, that just called bullshit on everything you’ve been saying for the last decade about Murdoch controlling Australians. And you agree with it enough to think it’s deserving of a repeated posting. I guess flip flopping on your fundamental beliefs ain’t no thang when you’re being told there’s a New Current Thing.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 11:12am

cooking (the East coast) with gas

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/05/the-gas-cartel-is-going-to-cras...

from article:

East coast $35/Gj
WA $<6/Gj
Production cost $1/Gj

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 11:17am

I think there is going to be a very, very hard landing for Albo once he comes off the honeymoon- which I will predict will officially end when the full fuel excise comes back in Sep.

Overnight 20 cents/litre increase in fuel, electricity prices up, food, housing costs all up.

there is going to be a massive price shock happening under current trajectories and all the talk about cost of living is going to be quicksand under the legislative agenda of the Govt.

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 11:55am
velocityjohnno wrote:

cooking (the East coast) with gas

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/05/the-gas-cartel-is-going-to-cras...

from article:

East coast $35/Gj
WA $<6/Gj
Production cost $1/Gj

Plus the gas is sold to China at $4 less than we pay for our own resource. This is after the gas exporters lied that they had enough gas to justify their projects when the condition for construction was that the6 wouldn’t Hoover up all the east coast gas supplies. They lied , the gas was hoovered up and the politicians refuse to implement the legal Dom gas reservation mechanism which was created for this very situation. The same Dom gas mechanism which gives WA it’s cheaper gas.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:30pm

Yep, nothing's changed since my Aussie grandfather sold cane at sixpence a ton.

Time for a letter to your new woke member I would think, as suggested here:

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/05/labor-ignores-gas-cartel-plunde...

How smart does WA look now?

Also, feel quite filthy for writing 'new woke member' above...

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:36pm

Agree FR on the landing after the honeymoon.

Here's more:

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/05/nervous-home-builders-confront-...

Still frantic work around here for the young one, lots of different jobs too which keeps life interesting. He had so many days when starting on concrete prep we were referring to it as 'liquid carpentry'.

tubeshooter's picture
tubeshooter's picture
tubeshooter Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:53pm
freeride76 wrote:

I think there is going to be a very, very hard landing for Albo once he comes off the honeymoon- which I will predict will officially end when the full fuel excise comes back in Sep.

Overnight 20 cents/litre increase in fuel, electricity prices up, food, housing costs all up.

there is going to be a massive price shock happening under current trajectories and all the talk about cost of living is going to be quicksand under the legislative agenda of the Govt.

Seems likely.
I think I might start hoarding fuel in 44gallon drums Mad Max style over the next few months.

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 3:20pm
velocityjohnno wrote:

Yep, nothing's changed since my Aussie grandfather sold cane at sixpence a ton.

Time for a letter to your new woke member I would think, as suggested here:

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/05/labor-ignores-gas-cartel-plunde...

How smart does WA look now?

Also, feel quite filthy for writing 'new woke member' above...

Just on gas in WA the 15% reserved for domestic used is some thing the state government did not federal government so what's stopping the east coast states doing the same?

The ADGSM talks about supply not so much price sounds like a complete disaster

"Australian Domestic Gas Security Mechanism
The Australian Domestic Gas Security Mechanism (ADGSM) is in place to ensure there is a sufficient supply of natural gas to meet the forecast needs of energy users within Australia.

If there is a supply shortfall in the domestic market, LNG projects may be required to limit their exports or find new gas sources.

The Minister for Resources, Water and Northern Australia is responsible for making the decision as to whether a shortfall market exists. The decision is informed by expert advice from:

Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO)
Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC)
industry and other government sources
Our department provides advice to the Minister on policies and processes relevant to the Act and regulations."

bonza's picture
bonza's picture
bonza Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 3:22pm
velocityjohnno wrote:

Agree FR on the landing after the honeymoon.

Here's more:

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/05/nervous-home-builders-confront-...

Still frantic work around here for the young one, lots of different jobs too which keeps life interesting. He had so many days when starting on concrete prep we were referring to it as 'liquid carpentry'.

some dirty dog has used my name in the MB comments. damn it.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Friday, 3 Jun 2022 at 10:22pm

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/the-devil-in-the-detail-of-gdp-f...

6.7%, wow. I'd link 'livin in the 70's' but just can't bring myself to do it.

Distracted's picture
Distracted's picture
Distracted Saturday, 4 Jun 2022 at 6:42am

It’s a good time to ponder that not only are the gas companies charging Australia more for the gas they produce here than what they export it overseas for, but they pay also sweet FA royalties on what they produce.

How on the hell do we end up in such a poor situation…. is it corruption or sheer stupidity?
https://reneweconomy.com.au/western-australian-gas-producers-pay-paltry-...

Robwilliams's picture
Robwilliams's picture
Robwilliams Saturday, 4 Jun 2022 at 10:17am

Selling Australians short. One dollar at a time. Sounds about right.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Saturday, 4 Jun 2022 at 11:10pm

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/06/silly-jim-is-about-crash-houses...

Australia truly is 'standing in it'. And yes, it's bearish and that's the book they talk. It's been a 30 year run of, well, putting off recession. It's called a cycle for a reason, it reverts to a mean, excesses are washed out, then growth restarts again - unless you get QE'd in which case it's the monetary Twilight Zone.

A more sanguine response might be, don't be fearful, what will happen, will happen. From the depths of the 1990s recession, there's always the message that you can still go surfing, music will still be good, friends and fun times will still exist.

sypkan's picture
sypkan's picture
sypkan Sunday, 5 Jun 2022 at 11:40am
velocityjohnno wrote:

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/06/silly-jim-is-about-crash-houses...

Australia truly is 'standing in it'. And yes, it's bearish and that's the book they talk. It's been a 30 year run of, well, putting off recession. It's called a cycle for a reason, it reverts to a mean, excesses are washed out, then growth restarts again - unless you get QE'd in which case it's the monetary Twilight Zone.

A more sanguine response might be, don't be fearful, what will happen, will happen. From the depths of the 1990s recession, there's always the message that you can still go surfing, music will still be good, friends and fun times will still exist.

I see this is even getting a run on abc now... about 6 months behind the curve...

blowin (and the most excellent macrobusiness) have been rattling on about this for months and months, years even...

and now the most reluctant labor party have been dragged kicking and screaming to the real party...

seriously, how are our leaders so fucking useless?

are labor just as bought as liberals when it comes to big energy?

or is this some ideological challenge to the status quo that those in power just couldn't stomach?

more tds perhaps?

the whole kit and kaboodle sounded ridicululous and rorting years ago when blowin first raised it

yet here we are... in a 'crisis'...

only when the rorting blows up in their faces do any of them act

pretty funny our cost of living saviours 'the teals' had not even heard of the madness until they had to eject their 'stalker'

is there anybody at all that represents 'the people'?

batfink's picture
batfink's picture
batfink Sunday, 5 Jun 2022 at 10:45pm
sypkan wrote:

and now the most reluctant labor party have been dragged kicking and screaming to the party '?

Oh come on Sypkan. They’ve been in two whole weeks. The electorate, or more accurately the MSM, haven’t allowed any serious discussion of the shit show that is coming our way.

Blowin was late to the party, as was macrobusiness. It’s been over leveraged since well before the GFC. The signs have been there for a decade plus, lord knows how we have propped it up this long. The chickens are coming home to roost. Strap yourselves in, it’s going to be a rough ride, and it won’t be the fault of the Labor Party.

sypkan's picture
sypkan's picture
sypkan Sunday, 5 Jun 2022 at 11:40pm

the gas batfink! the gas!

the point was about the gas!

if labor had any balls it would have been an issue well before the election...

but here they are - in power - dither dathering and making excuses...

amidst a full blown crisis

you might be ok with them protecting / preserving a gas cartel... but i would've thought that's not the role of a labor government...

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Monday, 6 Jun 2022 at 9:31am

From the Spectacularly Astute Macrobusiness

+
How energy war-profiteers will DESTROY house prices
By Houses and Holes

For much of last week, the Albanese Government ignored the once per fifty-year energy crisis.

Then, when forced to acknowledge its existence, it denied the availability or need for solutions.

Then, when yours truly threw a truth bomb into News.com mid-week and led ABC News with the story that a gas cartel is war profiteering, Albo’s cowards began to sniff that something may be up. That they might need to do something. And began walking back comments on domestic reservation for energy.

Over the weekend, the communications chaos continued with Bovver Bowen talking with forked tongue:

The Government will convene a meeting of state and territory energy ministers to plan out the response to the impending energy crisis, with the country facing the “perfect storm” on gas supply in particular.

…He said the gas trigger that could be put in place by the government to divert gas exports to domestic use was a “blunt” instrument, which wouldn’t be used in the near term.

While stressing Labor would not “rule anything in or out” in addressing the energy crisis, Mr Bowen said the trigger would not address the short-term problem.

“(Resources) Minister Madeleine King would have to go through a long series of consultations under law before it would apply and it wouldn’t apply until 1 January … there’s a lot of work there that Minister King will need to consider,” he said.

“In the short term, it (the trigger) is not the answer to this short-term crisis.”

He said Labor would ensure all necessary energy supplies were coming through, “whether they be coal or gas” and then planning for a transition in the long term towards more secure energy supply with the use of renewables.

Mad King is talking nonsense

Resources Minister Madeleine King has said coal-fired power generation must step up to help reduce soaring energy prices, as she cast doubt on pulling the so-called “trigger” to force export gas into the domestic market.

Describing the energy price spike as a “perfect storm”, Ms King said big gas producers were doing as much as they could to maximise supply, and it was important that coal fill the void to push energy prices down.

“It’s equally important for the coal industry to resolve its issues to get coal production back online as soon as we can, so it can continue to participate in power generation during this cold snap,” Ms King said in an interview with AFR Weekend.

“There are important issues with coal supply that have to be resolved because a great deal of the power generated for consumers in NSW and Victoria is from coal-fired power stations.”

Bringing more coal-fired electricity production back online won’t drop prices.

The main problem is fuel prices, not power availability (which is temporarily short on some turbine shutdowns).

Gas and coal prices are joined at the hip because they compete to produce the same product: electricity. The following chart is JKM gas futures versus SGX coal. Periods of divergence are brief, it is the trend that matters:

If Australia lurches back to more coal-fired power instead of gas-fired, electricity prices are not going to fall. Indeed, they could rise even further given the Eurozone does not even ban Russian coal until August which is why futures prices have been jumping.

The main problem the Albanese Government needs to address is that Australian exporters of coal and LNG are imposing war-profiteering prices upon our utility systems. For VIC and SA it’s more a gas issue. For NSW and QLD it is more a coal issue.

These shoddy billionaires are not doing so because they made smart investments. They are doing so because Ukrainians are being slaughtered leading to sanctions on Russia and an energy price windfall.

So, why is the Mad King telling them that there’s no way that Labor is going to limit exports for either commodity when it must do so to both?

Come Monday, she is not!

Ms King previously played down the prospect of activating the trigger, but told The Australian Financial Review on Sunday the need to extend its operation provided an opportunity to reconsider how it operates.

“It would be pertinent to have a review of the mechanism itself,” she said. “People will bring submissions in and everything can be on the table from the start, and we will try and design a better mechanism.”

The changes could come into effect in the second half of this year, though Ms King stressed potential changes were a medium-term fix: “Any review of implantation of the gas security mechanism will not help resolve the current crisis facing NSW and Victoria,” she said.

Ahead of flying to Indonesia on Sunday, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese mocked the Coalition’s “gas-led recovery” rhetoric and said after nine years of inaction the current issues would not be addressed “overnight”, while Opposition Leader Peter Dutton accused Labor of not knowing what to do.

Energy Minister Chris Bowen dismissed the criticism and described the current situation as “a perfect storm” Australia was “ill prepared” to deal with. He also said the Coalition’s gas trigger was “not particularly effective”.

Mr Bowen said Labor would consider all “sensible measures” to improve energy supply, including establishing a gas reserve on the east coast similar to Western Australia. He will chair a meeting of state and territory energy ministers on Wednesday to discuss short- and long-term solutions to the current crisis.

If sensibly handled, such policies will only drop the price of the 10% of gas volumes and 17% of total thermal coal volumes that remain in Australia. The rest can keep making hay in export markets.

This brings me to the real problem for the Albanese Government. It must drop gas and coal prices urgently or another accident is coming fast: an energy shock delivering an extra 5-10% CPI in the next two years:

Mr Fabo said households would be worse off with higher gas and electricity prices. “If utilities prices rise circa 20 per cent over a year, that’s a 1 percentage point boost to inflation and a drag on real income growth,” he said.

Deutsche Bank chief economist Phil O’Donaghoe said higher gas prices would add about half-a-percentage point to inflation by year’s end, while AMP Capital chief economist Shane Oliver tipped a rise of 0.2 of a percentage point. Dr Oliver also said higher prices could knock off up to 0.2 percent from GDP.

Mr Fabo said utility bills accounted for a higher share of lower-income households, who also had not built up the “excess savings” buffers of higher income households.

Owing to contract delays, the energy shock will persist for years, with an extra approximately 0.5% or more inflation (once we add spillovers) every quarter like clockwork.

This means that the RBA will be handed the impossible goal of crushing domestic demand to “make room” for the energy war-profiteers’ price rises.

Nor will the RBA be able to “look through” the shock because the nature of energy prices is to bleed into the cost base of every goods and services provider in the economy.

The economy is not structured to accommodate this shock meaning a large adjustment is likely.

We all know where higher interest rates will hit first and hardest: property. The cash rate required will have to be high enough to destabilise the Australian household debt mountain, bursting the property price bubble which is already popping on a $500bn fixed-rate reset from hell.

The Australian banking system will follow both into the crushing embrace of the energy singularity and recession smash what’s left while the RBA is forced to continue to hold rates too high to fight relentless energy price inflation.

The Australian economy is a simple income and leveraging mechanism. We sell dirt to the world for income and then our banks leverage the cash flow in global markets to inflate house prices and drive services economy spending.

If the energy cartel is allowed to run riot, the mechanism is going to reverse. We’ll be denuded of income for our dirt while the world ceases to lend to us for house price gains.

In short, energy war-profiteering will DESTROY the politico-housing complex that is the nucleus of the contemporary Australian economy

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Monday, 6 Jun 2022 at 4:07pm

Here's that cats and dogs living together I predicted in the housing thread, total chaos has begun...

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/news-life/wild-act-at-superm...

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/woolworths-shopper-slammed-ov...

Now I've heard it's $12 a lettuce?! Seriously?! We've set up the home lettuce hydro stack even tho it's out of season and yes, getting reasonable (as opposed to incredibly fast) growth.

"“They just have no regard for anyone,” she continued."

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Monday, 6 Jun 2022 at 4:20pm

An extra 54Mn in debt found

https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/remi-capital-d...

tech redundancies, Ukraine part of reason given:

https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/melbourne-tech...

"truck industry facing imminent collapse":

https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/australias-tr...

(I also note there's a Steve Shearer as SARTA CEO - FR are you moonlighting in SA freight?)

(this news site is solid when it comes to bear porn, and there seems to be visual stimulation as well...)

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Monday, 6 Jun 2022 at 6:07pm

This is a very good summary of how the current gas situation came to be:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-06/the-great-gas-rort-what-should-th...

Well done WA.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet Tuesday, 7 Jun 2022 at 8:52am

Good article, VJ.

To zoom out for a moment: Over the last, say, three decades most fed govts have retreated from nation building, planning, any kind of vision really, as they cede those goals to the private sector. This happened without a fight; in fact we rewarded the involved parties, repeatedly voted them back in etc etc. even when, as has happened over the last four years, organisations such as the Business Council pleaded for some kind of organisational framework.

Seems those same govts are gonna have to claw back some sovereignty. It won't happen without a fight and I hope the public now realises what we've given up and backs the party - any party - that best serves public interest.

garyg1412's picture
garyg1412's picture
garyg1412 Tuesday, 7 Jun 2022 at 10:11am

The problem is Stu that most of the public don't realise what we've given up because they are either ignorant or get their news information from the same corporate framework as these "sovereign thieves".
What was that saying?? "Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise". The public need to be shown what's interesting then they can act.

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Tuesday, 7 Jun 2022 at 12:57pm

Want to read something funny / jaw dropping in its audacity / infuriating in its lack of self awareness?

Here’s Barnaby Joyce claiming a decent federal ICAC hamstring visionary political leaders such as himself:

On Saturday, I was contacted by Ted Lindsay, who was the Labor member for the federal seat of Herbert in Townsville from 1983 to 1996. He wanted to warn me: a federal anti-corruption commission would be an abrogation of democracy.

But I fear that we in the Coalition are edging towards supporting such a body in Canberra – to make happy those who did not vote for us in the May 21 election.

Lindsay told me of a past federal inquiry, under then prime minister Bob Hawke, into a proposed form of an Independent Commission Against Corruption, such as the one in NSW. This, as we know, led to no such body – because the prevailing view was that it was not required.

In any case, the public scrutiny of federal politicians today is much more intense than for their state counterparts, courtesy of a better-resourced and more forensic media gallery and a question time that voters actually watch. Be honest. How often do you watch question time in a state parliament or see those MPs on Insiders or Sky?

Then there is the scrutiny of the federal auditor-general, Senate inquiries, House of Representatives inquires, standing committees, the Australian Federal Police.

Government ministers have – and must have – the discretion to step outside bureaucratic recommendations and make decisions based on a vision for a greater Australia. It might be a decision based on their political views, or on their compassion, and it might not subscribe to the purity of a business case.

If a politician like Ted Lindsay had been forced to go before an “integrity commission” to justify decisions to invest in the areas he represented, such as the building of Burdekin Falls Dam, might he have been deemed “corrupt”. That would have been a travesty. Seed infrastructure that has developed the north of Australia would not have passed a Canberra business case, but it was a political vision that had it built. And the people came, and subsequent analysis showed the decisions were worthy.

This is the vision of elected representatives, and that should not be usurped by another pillar of bureaucracy such as the proposed commission.

If we neuter the capacity of ministers to act as ministers, we diminish the power of cabinet government. Going to the office of your elected member of parliament with a request would become pointless because the power would reside in another building far away in Canberra - and not Parliament House. Any deviation from bureaucratic edict could be deemed corruption, so the primacy of the decision-making shifts from the parliament of the people to the bureaucracy of the government.

The government itself becomes a titular role that is no longer advised by the bureaucracy but is instructed by it. Real power moves to a closed club of senior bureaucrats.

Yes Minister is humorous because of the covert power Sir Humphrey Appleby has over Jim Hacker, the elected politician. For many in politics, however, it is less comedy than documentary. Ministers, in some instances lazy or inept, would be even less inclined to go against the brief sent up from the department if they feared being hauled before an anti-corruption body.

And if we move to anything that resembles the NSW ICAC – from which we witnessed an eviscerating, salacious expose´ into the personal life of Gladys Berejiklian – then we will usurp not only the proper process of democracy but of jurisprudence, such as by curtailing the laws of evidence, reversing the onus of proof and essentially stepping away from the development of hundreds of years of common law.

I have said to aspiring politicians that in local politics there is a dull candle of observation, in state politics it is a torch but in federal politics it is a massive spotlight. Politics at a federal level is prime-time viewing.

But if we manacle political vision by removing discretion and wish instead for beige automatism, or if we believe yet another policeman putting a lock on our door will finally stop crime, then we have fallen for the trap that takes power away from the person we voted for and gives it to the person we will never meet

AlfredWallace's picture
AlfredWallace's picture
AlfredWallace Tuesday, 7 Jun 2022 at 1:35pm

I’d say its time for Old Tomato Head Barnaby Joyce to wind up his affairs with all things politics, he just cant let go and cant believe voters wont or dont have faith in him or any other politicians. Geez our political system is a total basket case. So out of touch with what’s required to get on with moving forward as a nation instead of this Howardism philosophy of 2 steps forward and 3 back so as to keep us all there just how they like it. Fed up with living in a non-progressive country, we’ve been dilly dallying for 5 decades, its time to get cracking and build a better nation for all of us.

abc-od's picture
abc-od's picture
abc-od Tuesday, 7 Jun 2022 at 7:31pm

State of play revealed that Fairfax 9, or whatever they're called now, even ran that article today.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Wednesday, 8 Jun 2022 at 7:16pm

May the Gods save us! How has it got to this?!

I found this interview extremely cringey to watch, and actually found myself yelling at the screen a couple of times (I am not want to do this normally):

https://www.news.com.au/finance/australias-energy-crisis-hasnt-happened-...

Apparently we are the only major gas-exporting country that doesn't reserve supply for it's population!!! (not you, WA, you did well)...

The Rum Corps is alive and well.

Is it still true we're also the only OECD Top 20 economy that doesn't have a car industry? I understand we've slipped in the economic diversity index down to high 60s from the 20s too... How did it come to this?!?!

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Wednesday, 8 Jun 2022 at 7:19pm
stunet wrote:

Good article, VJ.

To zoom out for a moment: Over the last, say, three decades most fed govts have retreated from nation building, planning, any kind of vision really, as they cede those goals to the private sector. This happened without a fight; in fact we rewarded the involved parties, repeatedly voted them back in etc etc. even when, as has happened over the last four years, organisations such as the Business Council pleaded for some kind of organisational framework.

Seems those same govts are gonna have to claw back some sovereignty. It won't happen without a fight and I hope the public now realises what we've given up and backs the party - any party - that best serves public interest.

Yes Stu, that's a good observation - but if you watch the interview above, you will see absolutely zero resolve displayed to do anything like that, just feeble excuses and permitting the situation to continue. Oh how I would welcome a true public interest Australian political party!

AndyM's picture
AndyM's picture
AndyM Wednesday, 8 Jun 2022 at 7:23pm

Globalised neoliberalism VJ :)

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Wednesday, 8 Jun 2022 at 7:38pm

Indeed Andy. You'd be familiar with John Galt's disappearing machine shop where he made the motor that changed the world - it's almost as if you'd have to pull a stunt like that to manufacture in Australia these days... power from the aether, tell no one, flee to better pastures when found...

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Friday, 10 Jun 2022 at 12:50pm

The gas /energy situation.

We are in the middle of the narrative. Soon will be announced the game changing “compromise” of allowing the cartel to overturn the ban on fracking in order to save the day. A portion of the new destructive inland gas resources will be reserved for Australians and the machiavellian overthrow of the fracking ban will be sold as a heroic and philanthropic act by the cartel.

The job ahead of the MSM and ALP is to convince the public that the only option for gas at a reasonable price is in allowing the cartel to rape our nation’s interior and slice us off a morsel as an offering to buy our initial acquiescence.

ALP is bought and they know from Gough’s experience that any attempt to take on our masters and move past our role as a vassal state will elect the same response as the Central American countries taking on United Fruit back in the day.

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/how-to-keep-us-cooking-with-gas-...

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Friday, 10 Jun 2022 at 1:14pm

Or, we could divert gas for locals from existing fields, and keep the farmland unfracked :)

batfink's picture
batfink's picture
batfink Friday, 10 Jun 2022 at 10:11pm
sypkan wrote:

the gas batfink! the gas!

the point was about the gas!

if labor had any balls it would have been an issue well before the election...

but here they are - in power - dither dathering and making excuses...

amidst a full blown crisis

you might be ok with them protecting / preserving a gas cartel... but i would've thought that's not the role of a labor government...

Actually, the gas ‘problem’ has been the spot market price being what Oz paid, which was itself a travesty. That was a set in stone policy which was championed by the LNP and acquiesced by Labor. Yes, Labor has lacked balls, but the MSM made it clear that anything but acquiescence would lead to another term in opposition. What was it that Gough said, “Only the impotent are pure”.

You would have preferred impotence, and an LNP ‘gas-led recovery’, at 40 times the price it was at the time. You’re impotence is indeed, pure.

batfink's picture
batfink's picture
batfink Friday, 10 Jun 2022 at 10:19pm

No, I’m not at all in favour of Labour preserving a gas cartel, but there is no way the LNP would have done anything but support it. They put a gas executive in charge of, wait for it, ‘the Covid response’, and guess what, they came in with a recommendation for a gas-led recovery!!!

You can’t write this level of stupidity, but that is the choice we had.

I was arguing against the current gas cartel more than 15 years ago, and Labor, under Gillard, was a significant contributor to it, (under the delusion that QLD would vote them out if they didn’t support it.

Ultimate blame, the people of Australia, too lazy to be bothered thinking, too easily led by the corrupted MSM.

But sure, it’s all Labor’s fault. Three weeks in and they haven’t solved a decade of indolence.

But overall I agree with you, they are bought and sold, which is why I was hoping for a minority Labor govt.

batfink's picture
batfink's picture
batfink Friday, 10 Jun 2022 at 10:21pm

But it remains a fact that anything other than a vote for a teal candidate, a green, or a vote for Labor was a vote for insanity and delusion.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Tuesday, 14 Jun 2022 at 7:34pm

So yeah we've got a bit of a gas problem. It doesn't look like anyone is going to solve it any time soon. Summon the Dancers:

Robwilliams's picture
Robwilliams's picture
Robwilliams Tuesday, 14 Jun 2022 at 9:51pm

abc news
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-13/ian-verrender-column-on-electrici...

Fleeced from the top down one dollar at a time. And paying no income tax for the last 5 years 2/3rd's free, running Australians into the ground.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-06/the-great-gas-rort-what-should-th...
https://www.abc.net.au/news/programs/the-business/2022-06-13/foreign-com...
https://www.abc.net.au/news/programs/the-business/2022-06-14/manufacture...
We know how we got here.
Who ate all the pies?.................

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 12:11pm

electricity market troubles. Headline is incendiary once more, but worth a read to get a pasted wrap-up of what's going on:

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2022/06/albos-cowards-deliver-energy-fa...

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 12:15pm

The headline is appropriate.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 1:05pm

Yeah, a Whitlamesque change it ain't.

chook's picture
chook's picture
chook Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 1:10pm

the LNP devouted all their efforts (and tax payer monies) to ensuring that cool and gas dominated our power generation. that has left us with high power prices and unreliable power generation. it's not albo's fault.

DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet's picture
DudeSweetDudeSweet Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 1:36pm

Correction: Was Scomo’s fault.

Is now Albo’s fault.

If you don’t think there’s anything Albo can do to immediately address the energy issue in a powerful way then you must be drunk. Albo is sitting on his hands.

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 1:42pm

Yep, even Turnbull was calling for price and export controls under "force majeure" provisions in contracts.

sypkan's picture
sypkan's picture
sypkan Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 2:15pm

new SA premier on abc this morning

talking of 'nationalising' of electricity supply, with a $600 mil. investment, due to abject market failure...

a sign of things to come?

SA often ahead of the curve

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 2:36pm

Thats interesting.

chook's picture
chook's picture
chook Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 3:16pm
DudeSweetDudeSweet wrote:

Correction: Was Scomo’s fault.

Is now Albo’s fault.

If you don’t think there’s anything Albo can do to immediately address the energy issue in a powerful way then you must be drunk. Albo is sitting on his hands.

jeez...you're in for a real shock when you get to the end of 'the wizard of oz' and they pull back the curtain.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 3:27pm

Interesting things happening down in the Illawarra which has been penned in as both a Hydrogen Hub, and more broadly as a renewables hub.

With a deepwater port, skilled workforce, access to wind (at sea), access to pumped hydro (three nearby dams: Avon, Cataract, and Cordeaux, all at approx 500m high and near escarpment edge), and large tracts of land around the port to produce and use hydrogen (sector-coupling with existing steel-making)

Been lots of fluffy MSM stories and whatnot, but drilling down into what's happening shows a fairly significant roll out about to happen. To date, the only impediment has been a lack of policy scaring off investment, but that corner appears to have been turned. Currently land around the port is being bought, some by companies like Blue Scope wanting in on the hydrogen gig, and other parcels by the Uni of Wollongong for multi-purpose use. Firstly, provide some space for business/education sector to develop energy tech, and secondly, to create a work place more familiar with Wollongong's blue collar workers.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno Wednesday, 15 Jun 2022 at 3:50pm

Just out of interest, Toyota also looking at hydrogen:

https://www.carexpert.com.au/car-news/hydrogen-powered-toyota-corolla-an...

3 pronged approach: hydrogen fuel cell (Mirai)
Hydrogen PHEV (Prius)
and hydrogen burnt in an internal combustion engine (Corolla)

this approach would lessen the need for all those rare earth metals with the ICE variant, use existing technology