Climate Change

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blowfly started the topic in Wednesday, 1 Jul 2020 at 9:40am

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velocityjohnno Tuesday, 2 Nov 2021 at 9:00pm

It's very interesting the imposition of carbon/climate into world trade. Add it to uniform company tax laws proposed by Biden admin throughout the Western world (less, tax havens probably). The historian might go back and see the retreat from globalisation that occurred in 1905 with Joseph Chamberlain's 'Imperial Preference' as a means to restrict trade within the Empire and to exclude the new rising power (Germany: younger demographics, large population growth, more industrial power at the time)...ref: Thucydides trap - the incumbent won that one btw, it drew on old alliances...

Thus I see this stuff as a means of protection of the Western world: apply carbon standards everywhere. This might be a good thing. Go Greta!

For Australia - there will be a paradigm change in how we generate and store power, it's already begun with the large solar uptake. In fact, there's going to be a paradigm change in, everything. It's going to be a wild ride.

Edit: we've also got the uranium, and they are going to need that. Lucky country.

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Vic Local Tuesday, 2 Nov 2021 at 9:43pm

"The European's are too smart and money hungry to shit on themselves . Any tariffs they impose will be for show and WILL have no impact on Australia ."
Sorry Hutchy19, but for a person who works in finance this is a ridiculous statement. Imposing tariffs on goods and services provided by countries not pulling their weight re climate change, shits on those countries, not on the EU. Who exactly do you think gets the $$$? I will give you a hint. Not fucking Australia.

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JQ Tuesday, 2 Nov 2021 at 9:48pm
Hutchy 19 wrote:

Vic - I did read the comments you posted .

It said from memory " tariffs would be applied to countries that don't have the right , in our opinion , Climate Policies . Tariffs will be applied so as these countries don't have a price advantage .

Remember I thanked you for posting it and proving that using their production that is Green friendly IS more expensive . I said they wouldn't stop buying our coal as it is the best quality and emission friendly in the world . That we could retaliate and not buy BMW's , Volvo's and VW's . That we could grow our own oaks and truffles .

That we import more from them than they do from us . I posted the official trade figures from the government which SHOWED how big the deficit was .

I said bring on the war as they have a knife and we have a guns . I said they have always been good at starting wars and we are good at finishing and winning them .

How quickly you forget ! My motto is " Lest we forget ".

Please let me know if what you posted was BS !

We have the guns do we Hutch? Do ya mean a cap gun?

We represent a piddly 1.8% of the EU's exports, while the EU accounts for at least 3.41% of Australia's exports.

https://tradingeconomics.com/european-union/exports-by-country

https://tradingeconomics.com/australia/exports-by-country

Take the cherry picker out for a run did we chief?

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I focus Tuesday, 2 Nov 2021 at 11:38pm

Simple test re tariffs.

Last election cycle Australian business and industry representative organisations were condemning action on climate change.

Now Australian business and industry representative organisations are calling for net zero and urgent action on climate change.

Spot the difference.

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 8:20am

The graph shows the results of a survey of 92 climate scientists who contibuted to the latest IPCC report. The results of COP26 will probably increase the number predicting a three degree rise.....and the consequences of that? Well more later.

Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-8-16-37-am

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 8:51am

So what does a three degree rise look like. This will do for starters
Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-8-34-28-am

10 year heatwaves more than 6 times more likely. 50 year heatwaves over 14 times more likely.

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 8:59am

And thenm there is this.
Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-8-34-28-am

10 year one day rain events double with about a 20% increase in intensity
10 year drought events increase by 3 and 0.6 of a sytandard deviation drier.

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Hutchy 19 Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 9:19am

At least Greta can see what the rich love fest achieved . I have already said I like her very much for her views and conviction .

Daily Mail

US President Joe Biden, Prime Minister Boris Johnson, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Canadian PM Justin Trudeau gathered in Glasgow last night for the biggest diplomatic meeting in Britain in 75 years. Outside in Festival Park, Greta Thunberg gave a passionate and foul-mouthed speech, telling demonstrators: 'Inside Cop, there are just politicians and people in power pretending to take our future seriously... No more blah blah blah, no more whatever the f*** they are doing inside there!' As heads of Government from around the world discussed what could be done to save the planet from ruin, the Swedish eco activist was also filmed riling up her fellow activists with a chant of: 'You can shove your climate crisis up your a***'.

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 11:18am

It's funny that the miners are showing more leadership than any politicians in this country. Well some of the WA ones are

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-11-03/australian-miners-ramp-up-plans-t...

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 11:31am
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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 11:37am

Well the various ministers appear to be following the PM's lead. They have gone from conventional submorons to nuclear submorons

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 11:46am

In la la land. Things do seem to be picking up pace, albeit slowly and around 20 years too late. Not from the government though, they obviously still believe the whole climate change thing is a joke

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flollo Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 11:51am

Miners will hugely profit from the transition. Look at lithium, for example, the supply needs to grow exponentially to meet the future demand. I can't see why would large mining companies object to climate change policies. I would ditch coal instantly. This is what Rio Tinto is forecasting:

"In a presentation to investors, Rio Tinto’s head of economics Vivek Tulpule said EV sales are on track to hit up to 55% of the world’s total light vehicles sales as early as 2030, reaching about 65 million units.

This means manufacturers would need about three million tonnes of lithium, compared with the roughly 350,000 tonnes they consume today, Tulpule noted.

Existing operations and projects combined, however, are slated to contribute one million tonnes of lithium, he said.

Rio Tinto estimates that committed supply and capacity expansions will contribute about 15% to demand growth over the 2020-2050 period. The remaining 85% would need to come from new projects. "

https://www.mining.com/rio-tinto-says-60-jadar-mines-wouldnt-fill-loomin...

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 12:13pm

Probably should note that these are 'metallic' mines, not fossil fuels. But things are looking better. Also with regard to batteries, there are alternatives to using lithium. Maybe not available right now, but they are being developed and shouldn't be too far away.

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 12:15pm

EVs? But they're slow with no power (or so we all thought hahaha)

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 12:30pm

“ Surface temperatures will remain approximately constant at elevated levels for many centuries after a complete cessation of net anthropogenic CO2 emissions. A large fraction of anthropogenic climate change resulting from CO2 emissions is irreversible on a multi-century to millennial timescale, except in the case of a large net removal of CO2 from the atmosphere over a sustained period.” Summary For Policy Makers - Global Warming of 1.5°C. IPCC

In other words, once the planet heats up, given the continuing failure of CCS technology, it will stay hot for a long time.

If we are optimistic and assume that emissions peak in 2040 (RCP4.5), then the average predicted increase from all models is 2.5°C and there is a greater than 66% chance that the increase will be between 1.7 and 3.3°C. These numbers reveal a fundamental problem for policy makers. An increase of 3.3ºC, which these figures suggest is quite possible, would be catastrophic. How do you explain to your consituents that you are rolling the dice on climate catastrophe? So far the answer is “You don’t.” You just keep feeding them bullshit!

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 12:37pm

@ Gragagan
That’s awesome. 450hp direct to the wheels. 250 miles range is pretty impressive. Wonder what the cost is. Does anyone know the charge times of these Teslas?

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flollo Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 12:38pm
gragagan wrote:

Probably should note that these are 'metallic' mines, not fossil fuels. But things are looking better. Also with regard to batteries, there are alternatives to using lithium. Maybe not available right now, but they are being developed and shouldn't be too far away.

Yeah, fair call. What it all shows is that opportunities exist and fossil fuel companies can pivot or perish. This is a daily reality for many businesses and they shouldn't be exempted.

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 12:50pm

@seeds I think in the vid they mention the cost but can't remember exactly. There's so many modifications needed to be able to handle that sort of power so it adds up. But with more and more EVs entering the market costs will come down. The conversion cost would be more than a new car, so out of range for most. There are cheaper conversions, but not sure about here in Australia, we do seem to be lagging.
*This vid only came to me (I didn't look for it) the other day. So I don't know much about them at all, only what I've seen in half a dozen youtube vids. It surprised me, all I'd ever heard about electrics is that they're slow, no power etc. There's another 600hp beetle that he's done, faster than a supercar.

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:14pm

It interests me as a four wheel driver, for play and touring, when and if 4x4s go electric will they have enough power.
Also if towing needing good amounts of torque available. If it happens cost will probably be way out of my range.
Had a few kombis in my younger days and loved them. Except for the lack of power

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Optimist Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:18pm

Normal cars will probably be able to be converted to hydrogen quite easily so you can keep your old fourby or your 57 chev.

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flollo Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:23pm

@seeds have a look at Rivian. Going to IPO soon as well and announced entry to Aus market.

https://rivian.com/r1t

+Ford F150 looks sick. Overall, US 4 x 4 market is well ahead of us but we will move sooner or later.

Also, ABC published an article on converting classic cars into electric cars not that long ago. It's definitely happening.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2021-10-18/converting-classic-cars-t...

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Supafreak Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:20pm

@seeds , don’t have the answer for you but a close friend in perth who’s a auto electrician has a mate in the same business and he developed a electric drag racing car that did over 200 klm ph on the 1/4 mile track . He attracted a lot of attention from the US , this was about 6 years ago . Unfortunately he was bashed in a home invasion and not sure where he’s at with it all now but sounded like power wasn’t a problem .

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:31pm

Suppose the more batteries the more power but with that comes weight. Then losing the original donk makes up for it if these electric motors are significantly lighter. I suppose the bigger they get the heavier also. Be a happy medium somewhere.

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:37pm

@ flollo those Rivians have pretty good specs hey. Funny looking

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 1:42pm

I’ve driven a Prius work car and it was weird when running on electric. No engine noise was strange. I love the feel and sound of my V8. Manufacturer’s might have to add sound effects to keep us happy

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Hutchy 19 Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:05pm

seeds - Rev heads like you are maybe not the type that BB wants to reach on climate issues . If you knew anything about EV's you would know that the manufacturers already have . Silly boy !

Go onto the other thread and prove that I am wrong when I accused you of lying and not thinking .

What type of seeds have you been planting ?

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:02pm

I love the sound of big engines too, that vid appeared in my feed while looking at vids of big old aircraft engines.
The biggest questions I'd have with EVs would be range, and how / where to recharge. Does anyone know what recharge times would be?

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:10pm

"I love the sound of big engines too......."

More noise = Less power. The most pathetic vehicles on the road though are those Harleys designed to make the most possible noise "Look at me! Look at me!" Infantile stuff.

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:18pm
Hutchy 19 wrote:

seeds - Rev heads like you are maybe not the type that BB wants to reach on climate issues . If you knew anything about EV's you would know that the manufacturers already have . Silly boy !

Go onto the other thread and prove that I am wrong when I accused you of lying and not thinking .

What type of seeds have you been planting ?

Not a rev head and never have been.
Serves a purpose but does also sound good as a bonus.
Quite agree with most of what Blindboy says even if he is boringly incessant with his on and on blathering as you are.
And this go onto the other thread and respond to me nonsense you do all the time when you haven’t had a response in a minute is pathetic.
You really are a dick!

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:22pm
blindboy wrote:

"I love the sound of big engines too......."

More noise = Less power. The most pathetic vehicles on the road though are those Harleys designed to make the most possible noise "Look at me! Look at me!" Infantile stuff.

Well I’d agree they are just ridiculous. It’s a laugh when they all take off from the pub after a beer on their rides and they floor it for first 100 metres.

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:22pm

I don't like them on the roads though, never had one never will. Too dirty, use too much fuel, impractical. Not into motor racing of any kind. Was watching vids of restored ww2 fighter planes, and how sketchy they were to fly

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gragagan Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:26pm

I think the subconscious reason I posted the vid on the electric kombi was to show people who love their V8s / big loud cars, that electric cars can go much faster. V8s aren't so great after all

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 2:38pm

No they are great but will be relegated to history soon enough. My everyday driver is a 4 cylinder Holden Cruze. You oughta see me hanging out front of 7 Eleven in that on a Saturday night Hutchy!! Bonnet up,leaning on the fender, looking cool and all.

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evosurfer Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 3:21pm

I drive all sorts of race cars and road cars have a evo9 for track and road
plus a multivan and coaster for off the grid searches. I was a V8 coach
and Hot lap driver driver for Fastrack racing until the China virus ruined
our lives and in my case lively hood. I love the roar of V8s and the power
and handling of turbos and pretty much any car that goes hard and handles
well. Personally in reality I dont think in the big picture of the world Australia
is a drop in the ocean compared to the likes of China , India, UK, USA etc
but here we are with the do gooders wankers saying we are going to lead the
world with climate change. I wont be giving up petrol until the last drop.
Electric cars are dangerously quite and go no where in distance they will
have to improve a hell of a lot to get me in one. Be interesting what the
do gooders and ignorant politicians do when most cars are electric and
kids and pedestrians get splattered all over the place.

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 3:28pm

Meanwhile we can't even reach the low hanging fruit.
https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/post/max-opray/2021/11/03/australia-...

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 3:49pm

@ evosurfer
I’ll attest to that. Few year ago having a quiet early morning walk in Hong Kong. No people around no traffic noise. Crossing the road where there was a bend. Half way across looked to my left as I sensed something and had a Tesla bearing down on me at speed. Didn’t hear a thing. Very very close

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Hutchy 19 Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 4:04pm

Blind One - did you read flollo's post ?"Rio Tinto estimates that committed supply and capacity expansions will contribute about 15% to demand growth over the 2020-2050 period. The remaining 85% would need to come from new projects. "

This is just EV demand . Batteries is extra . I do hope there is a substitute for lithium but I bet it doesn't grow on trees or lies on top of the ground .

You didn't believe the link that said new projects take between 10-15 years from discovery to production . Why ?

https://www.explorelesmines.com/en/mining-industry/mining-cycle.html

They are a pro mining group and would not OVERestimate the timeline .

Please provide any link with another timeline estimate .

This is a major issue ! The world will require millions of mega batteries by 2050 to enable us to get to net zero CO2 on top of the demand for EV's

As I have pointed out major new sources of rare commodities need to be found and mines built . RIO estimates the percentage at 85% just for EV's .The battery demand would be greater than EV demand .

How is all this possible ?

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 4:19pm

Where we are already. Observed global temperature changes since 1950.
Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-4-17-01-pm
Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-4-17-51-pm

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Hutchy 19 Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 5:48pm

Where we are NOW .

Authored by Pat Buchanan,

“Colossal Stakes as Leaders Meet to Talk Climate,” ran the headline.

“The Last Best Hope,” ran the subhead, which turned out to be a quote from President Joe Biden’s climate czar John Kerry.

But these alarmist headings were not atop an editorial. They topped the lead news story in Sunday’s New York Times, the opening line of which set the tone for Glasgow: “The future is on the line.”

Somini Sengupta, climate reporter, then laid out the “colossal stakes” of the summit.

“As presidents and prime ministers arrive in Glasgow this week for a pivotal climate summit, the outcome will determine, to a large extent, how the world’s seven billion people will survive on a hotter planet and whether far worse levels of warming can be averted …

“Already, the failure to slow rising temperatures — brought on by the burning of oil, gas and coal — has led to deadly floods, fires, heat, and drought around the world.”

The hype is on. And the establishment media are playing their assigned role - portraying a failure at Glasgow as a guarantee of the looming apocalypse.

The first leader the Times quoted was from Barbados.

“That we are now so perilously close to the edge for a number of countries,” said Prime Minister Mia Mottley, “is perhaps the tragedy of our times.”

The theology of the climate crisis runs like this.

The planet has warmed by 1.1 degree Celsius since the Industrial Revolution. If warming rises to more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above 1900 levels, more and more terrible weather disasters will occur: wildfires, hurricanes of growing severity, droughts, coastal and river flooding, and islands sinking into the sea.

The only way to stave off “climate catastrophe” is for all nations to cut carbon emissions radically now and for the world to reach net zero emissions by midcentury.

A fast phaseout of the major emitters of carbon dioxide — the burning of coal, oil and gas to heat homes, run cars and generate power — and replacement of these fossil fuels with clean energy — solar, wind, nuclear — is a moral and political imperative.

But if such a radical transformation of national economies is the only way to avert the impending crisis, we should brace ourselves and prepare for that crisis. For there is no way the demanded changes in energy consumption are going to be made by 2030.

Consider.

The world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide is China, which burns half of the world’s coal and is building new coal-fired plants even as the 30,000 summiteers gather in Glasgow.

China was given a license in the Paris climate accord of 2015 to burn all the coal it wishes until 2030, after which it has agreed to begin reducing carbon emissions. But the idea that China can or will convert in a few decades to wind, solar and nuclear power to run the world’s largest manufacturing plant seems preposterous.

The U.S., the world’s second largest emitter of carbon dioxide, gets 81% of its energy from oil, coal and natural gas. We depend on those fuels to heat our homes, run our vehicles and power our industry.

In his Build Back Better bill, Biden inserted a provision that would have imposed annually rising taxes on carbon producers and used the revenue to reward companies that reduced their reliance on fossil fuels.

The proposal had to be pulled out, lest it drag Biden’s entire bill down to defeat. Lest we forget, Sen. Joe Manchin is from West Virginia.

India, the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gases, is also, like China, dependent on coal. But, though its population is as large as China’s, India is behind China industrially, and the standard of living of its 1.4 billion people is below that of China.

To demand that India begin to end its burning of coal and rely more on solar and wind is to demand that New Delhi accept a future where India’s standard of living remains lower than that of China.

As for Russia, the fourth largest emitter of carbon dioxide, it is rich in fossil fuels and the leading supplier of natural gas to Europe. But Moscow manipulates the supplies of its natural gas to its customers for reasons of both revenue and politics.

Neither Chinese President Xi Jinping nor Russian President Vladimir Putin will even be present in Glasgow.

Saudi Arabia, the Gulf states and other OPEC nations depend for their national income on oil exports. If fossil fuels become forbidden fuels, what is to become of these nations?

Will they accept a future where their primary natural resource is gradually outlawed by the rest of the world? Will they be content to rely on the industrialized world to provide them with windmills and solar panels to power their economies?

The world’s losers from this Glasgow summit are likely to be the billions of people who will never know the benefits of fossil fuels that produced the Industrial Revolution and created the affluent societies of the 20th century .

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 5:58pm

These two are probably enough evidence that COP26 is a non-serious attempt
Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-5-52-14-pm
instagram album downloader

but then there is this

Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-5-54-07-pm

and this
Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-5-54-07-pm

and this

Screen-Shot-2021-11-03-at-5-57-39-pm

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velocityjohnno Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 7:09pm

Hey Evosurfer that's mad, quite a skillset. Perhaps you could teach myself or young one, one day in a roadgoing V8?

There will still be a place for naturally aspirated V8s, because some people will value the mechanical engagement and want to experience it. Maybe it will go E85 or E100 like the race cars. Also to note is many of the old V8s, particularly the manual ones, tend to become classics and are doing hardly any kms, so their impact is minimal in this guise. Don't get me started on container ships...

But for the momentum, it will go electric (with full torque from zero revs), I expect 4wds will get way better too, and probably not need snorkels! Imagine being able to dial in the revs to absolutely minute levels to crawl up/down things - no need for a mechanical/electronic traction control interface... There's also the promise of greater simplicity, less servicing - so long as we don't stuff them too full of electronic equipment. Cars could last a lot longer, just as many people convert to not owning one but rather paying for their transport on-demand through an app (TAAS) - though that one's probably more for city people and surfers like their wagons as their wagons. Plus the threat of the last passenger of the uber robo-car throwing up in it...

However, as described, we don't have quite enough lithium, rare earths (stuff like praseodymium) and even if we do, the supply chains are developing into two parallel systems - China, and West. This is why the Toyota approach I described in a page before (3 types of hydrogen power) is important too, as we are going to need multiple approaches to get there. Interesting as well, Toyota have announced their first electric car - they seem to have lagged in recent years after pioneering hybrid.

There's also the other feature of electric cars in a distributed power supply - the car batteries can act as backups to the grid. If parked and charged, homes could run off them if required for some time too. So we might be OK with the current very large batteries being installed as backup, renewables, and each house solar/battery with an electric car. (And of course a V8 in the shed!)

I'm currently doing energy budgeting trying to work out if I need extra capacity for a small electric commuter, generating 25 to 35kw/h per day, using 10-15kw/h and exporting some of the rest, car is traveling bugger all km, less than 10 on average per day - but this could be up to 100 if commuting to town. Still gathering data

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velocityjohnno Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 7:18pm

Also on the cars, been watching Harry's Garage (founder of Evo magazine in the 90s) on yt and he's getting 68mpg from his hybrid 2.7tonne Range Rover, which is phenomenal when you think about it and remember they would get 15mpg on a good day. 2.0L petrol motor and battery/electric that can run about 20km before it needs motor input.

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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 7:21pm
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blindboy Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 8:04pm

But we're not going that way.

"Prime Minister Scott Morrison may be on his way home from COP26, but Australia’s embarrassing stance on fossil fuels remains on full display in Glasgow – literally. The government is being widely criticised by everyone from bushfire survivors to experts for hosting gas company Santos at the Australian pavilion in the Scottish exhibition centre, where the business-focused part of the conference continues for another 10 days. (The summit has been described as “part-trade fair and part-public relations opportunity”.) The front of the Australian pavilion yesterday featured a “demonstration” of Santos’ newly confirmed Moomba carbon capture and storage project (experts have noted it will capture just 0.343 per cent of Australia’s annual emissions “at best”), with signage claiming that Australia can “lead the world” in the highly dubious technology. The disconcerting display comes amid the release of new analysis by The Australia Institute showing that the government has 116 fossil-fuel developments in the pipeline – projects that would result in nearly 1.7 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases per annum, or about 5 per cent of global industrial emissions. It’s little wonder Australia was one of the only nations not to sign up to last night’s commitment to reduce methane emissions by 30 per cent by 2030. It wasn’t because, as acting PM Barnaby Joyce claims, you’d have to go out and shoot your cattle to achieve it. It likely has much more to do with the Coalition’s plan for a “gas-fired” recovery."

https://www.themonthly.com.au/today/rachel-withers/2021/03/2021/16359130...

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seeds Wednesday, 3 Nov 2021 at 9:05pm
velocityjohnno wrote:

Also on the cars, been watching Harry's Garage (founder of Evo magazine in the 90s) on yt and he's getting 68mpg from his hybrid 2.7tonne Range Rover, which is phenomenal when you think about it and remember they would get 15mpg on a good day. 2.0L petrol motor and battery/electric that can run about 20km before it needs motor input.

That is incredible milage compared to old factory motor. Any idea how much torque the electric motor can produce for towing or off road applications.

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Hutchy 19 Thursday, 4 Nov 2021 at 8:18am

Seeds - Car talk ( even if its EV's ) has had enough of a run on this thread imo .

Why don't you start a EV or not Rev Head Thread ? You can make all the noise you want there . You say you aren't a Rev head but you then TALK like this .

" Any idea how much torque the electric motor can produce". As a non RH that fits my definition .

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seeds Thursday, 4 Nov 2021 at 8:53am

Oh right you make the rules now Hutchy. What a conceited condescending old twat you are.

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seeds Thursday, 4 Nov 2021 at 8:53am

Cars and their future power source doesn’t have anything to do with climate change? They are burning fossil fuel to produce power just as coal fired power stations are.
And the need for torque isn’t limited to my recreational needs is it.
Big industry machinery, agriculture, trucking etc all have high torque requirements from their engines. I don’t think EVs are going to cut it.
Optimist might be right. Keeping the combustion engine powered by green hydrogen may be the way forward where needed

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blindboy Thursday, 4 Nov 2021 at 9:14am

So you have never driven a hybrid or ev then seeds? Greater torque delivered instantly, orders of magnitude fewer moving parts in an ev. Then there are the benefits of reduced air, and noise, pollution. They would be happening even without climate change. And the electricity will come from solar, wind and other renewables.