What's what?

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Shatner'sBassoon started the topic in Friday, 6 Nov 2015 at 7:48pm

AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING KALEIDOSCOPIC JOIN-THE-DOTS/ADULT COLOURING BOOK EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT IN NARCISSISTIC/ONANISTIC BIG PICTURE PARASITIC FORUM BLEEDING.

LIKE POLITICAL LIFE, PARTICIPATION IS WELCOME, ENCOURAGED EVEN, BUT NOT NECESSARY.

Sheepdog's picture
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Sheepdog commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 3:11pm

Sheepdog

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 3:13pm

Lifty hangs shit on people cause theyve got Dutch heritage.

Lifty hangs shit on others cause they have English heritage.

Lifty hates bigots with all his might .

Lifty ain’t that bright obviously.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 3:15pm

Shit weather where you are too , Sheepy ?

Sheepdog's picture
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Sheepdog commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 3:25pm

Crappy today yes.... Had some nice days before the change though.

Sheepdog

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 3:32pm

I’ve been hanging to sit on a lounge and binge watch some good shows next to a warm fire whilst rain lands on the roof for ages. Now it’s all come together - I’m in a house and it’s raining and cold and shitty - and the TV doesn’t work .

Poking Lifty for fun is losing its appeal.

Now it’s a community service.

sypkan's picture
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sypkan commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 5:04pm

Oh don't go crypto.

I still like you (gods knows why) and this is still fun...mostly...

Just saying I wonder how you think you fit into the bigger picture. You know, with you and all that ' wholistic thought' big picture thinking and stuff....

Not even talking to you really...just wondering aloud...

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 5:28pm

It's a pity his post are so attacking and negative because i think some of the indigenous subject matter is really interesting.

I was reading more today trying to understand why remote indigenous communities have the biggest problems, while indigenous communities with more exposure to non indigenous society do not.

If we were having a decent conversation, Herc could actually say yeah, i agree on this point but not that aspect, and then say i think this and that etc.

But unfortunately he never does, its always only attacks and abuse, or a bias history lesson.

Anyway i found this part of the article written by anthropologist David McKnight who spent a total of six years there over a few decades, very interesting .

"Here McKnight is at his most valuable. Indigenous society, as he explains in detail, is fundamentally more communal than modern white society. “Western individualism” implies some basic attitudes and practices that we need to be consciously aware of, so as not to assume they apply in another society. A typical Australian wage earner or welfare recipient collects his/her payment, enters a home into which others do not come without invitation, spends the money on what he/she determines, and directs the use of the items the money buys. None of that can be assumed true in a highly communal society. Private property is a meaningless concept if one is enmeshed in a network of obligations to give away everything if kin demand it. There is shame in refusing a request from someone appropriately kin, and refusals can engender grudges that are held for a long time. For the division of irregular hunting kills, there was a good reason for a system of rights to portions of it. The same practices are dysfunctional in a modern setting. No one except “bigmen” has the unimpeded power to spend their own wages, pension or baby bonus, retain their own medicines, repair anything, or find a place to study in a house full of twenty relatives. It does not make sense to talk of “economic incentives” in the usual sense or the provision of jobs or training in situations where people do not retain the fruit of their labours.

Communal obligation also means that social pressure to drink is similar to but much stronger than “peer pressure” in a white social setting. It also results in the small number of teetotallers being run ragged by their obligations to look after drunks and their children—and with the last generation of mission-educated grandmothers dying off, the families they have held together are likely to fall apart even further. Finally, obligations include support in disputes, so individual fights quickly turn into all-in melees.

McKnight suggests also that one reason for increased violence was what he calls “relational density”. In pre-contact times, Mornington Islanders lived in groups of about twenty or thirty, in which, naturally, everyone had some sort of personal relationship or “kinship” with everyone else, with corresponding degrees of rights and obligations. When hundreds of people collected in a village near the mission, everyone including long-term white settlers was incorporated into kinship systems. The cognitive load of understanding every individual’s relations with everyone else became enormous, with high potential for proliferating disputes about legitimacy of marriages, obligations to help, food, old and complex feuds and so on. There were also some problems with traditional rival groups living side by side, but McKnight believes these were minor compared to the chaos of the vast network of individual kinship relations.

That still leaves it unclear why violence and alcohol are so much more out of control in remote communities than in our society. As with our ability to close the front door and assume no one will come in uninvited, perhaps we need first a better awareness of what our abilities to drink moderately and restrain anger rest on.

A normal Western child grows up with a non-stop training in self-restraint, from toilet training through fixed meal- and bed-times to regimented and compulsory schooling and sport. Traditional indigenous child-rearing practices, still largely intact, are very different. McKnight states baldly, “Children are indulged and rarely disciplined” (and if one relative attempts discipline, others will step in to prevent it). Black parents were often shocked by how white parents disciplined their children. The indulgent period lasted until the early teenage years, when an extreme level of discipline was suddenly imposed through a violent initiation (for boys) or marriage to an elder (for girls). Plainly, low levels of discipline in childhood are no way to develop the normal levels of self-restraint that keep drinking and violence in check.

And it goes on further after that.

https://quadrant.org.au/magazine/2008/11/the-cultural-roots-of-aborigina...

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CryptoKnight commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 5:30pm

'Order... order!!!! There's been charges leveled against you by leading, professional... all time swillnuts!!! in a nutshell!! Stand up and respond.... shit you are a pristine, raw boned, big good lookin', injury free cunt aren't you!!!!

'Who me ya honour... nice mallet... ever thought of swappin' it for a fish baton??'

'Why...'

'Coz this leading, professional all time swillnut uses one.... see, read this...'

'Bailiff read that out for the court to hear... all of it...'

Multiple WTF's, dry retching and screams fill the air...

'What is this fucking psycho shit... FFS, who are these fucking, bullshitting psycho idiots!!! Wait a minute... who's this uplift guy... and the turkey...'

'I'm uplift your honour...'

'Thank God... a sane person... you are free to go!!! Hang on... wait a minute... what's this about references, awards and stuff... '

'You mean these your honour...'

'My God man, that is extremely commendable... wait a minute... aren't you the guy that rehabbed... again... my God, again... he must have been over joyed...'

'Eeerm, well... well... ya see... in a nutshell... plus... well erm... ever heard of google ya honour... see... if ya read this too...'

'Bailiff get the special ops on to this, find these fucking, bullshitting, delusional lunatics!!!'

'Excuse me ya honour, just before I go... did I just hear special ops... ah, well, see, I know it sounds... well... that fishy baton guy... well, its probably best if you read it...'

'This is fucking insane!!! Bailiff, get me the prime minister...'

'Excuse me your honour... there's just another thing, again... I have to admit... I haven't got any dunces hats...'

'What do you mean...'

'Perhaps you should read this... too...'

'Prime minister... good morning this is urgent.... wait, hold on a second prime minister... yes... what is it... you don't mind if I call you lifty do you...'

'No, not at all ya honour... there's this one last bit of stuff... well its only about bitcoins and that... but I thought... well, you might like to see it...'

'Vlad, Scotty here... we need some 'work' done... I sent through some info you might want to read...'

'Egor!!'

'Yes President Putin!!!'

'Well done... operation swillnut is working magnificently!!! The swillnuts, those brain washed, terminally brain dead, zombie, idiot morons you created, have infiltrated Australia, and are wreaking havoc!!! And nice touch Egor... how did you know... they did love the dunces hats!!!'

'But Egor, I thought you said you'd taken care of Krypto!!!! What, he's gone underground... again... OMG!!! Nooooo!!! Get Himmmmmm!!!!! Somebody... '

happyasS's picture
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happyasS commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:11pm

He doesn't fit 'into the picture' sypkan...he fills the picture and then some. Then there's his mirrors...you don't want to go there. So many mirrors, there's uplifts everywhere.

Yes thanks CK. List is growing. I just do it for fun. Heck maybe oneday I might even be as good as you. Clients will travel the globe just to hear my tales. There'll be some lifting too but mostly talking...lots of it....and staring in the mirror if course.

Sheepdog's picture
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Sheepdog commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:12pm

Yeeaahhhh I'm not reading that.

Sheepdog

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Sheepdog commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:16pm

I see Peter "Pontiac" Dutton hasn't many libs coming out to defend him.
40 votes..... But when it comes to "au pairs", the scatter like mice

Sheepdog

blindboy's picture
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blindboy commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:23pm

Lots of jokes going around about how strange it is for a right winger to be in favour of a nanny state.

GuySmiley's picture
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GuySmiley commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:26pm

goofyfoot's picture
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goofyfoot commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:37pm

This cunts heads gunna pop off.

The big raw boned good looking fellas head is actually gunna pop off he’s getting so worked up. Red mist all over port Lincoln

Sheepdog's picture
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Sheepdog commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:40pm

Blind boy....... I like it lol

Sheepdog

happyasS's picture
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happyasS commented Saturday, 1 Sep 2018 at 6:42pm

Nah. He could do this shit in his sleep.

I have to say I went back and read his latest manifest. Not bad. Has comedy, has plot.

sypkan's picture
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sypkan commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 2:06pm

""Here McKnight is at his most valuable. Indigenous society, as he explains in detail, is fundamentally more communal than modern white society. “Western individualism” implies some basic attitudes and practices that we need to be consciously aware of, so as not to assume they apply in another society. A typical Australian wage earner or welfare recipient collects his/her payment, enters a home into which others do not come without invitation, spends the money on what he/she determines, and directs the use of the items the money buys. None of that can be assumed true in a highly communal society. Private property is a meaningless concept if one is enmeshed in a network of obligations to give away everything if kin demand it. There is shame in refusing a request from someone appropriately kin, and refusals can engender grudges that are held for a long time. For the division of irregular hunting kills, there was a good reason for a system of rights to portions of it. The same practices are dysfunctional in a modern setting. No one except “bigmen” has the unimpeded power to spend their own wages, pension or baby bonus, retain their own medicines, repair anything, or find a place to study in a house full of twenty relatives. It does not make sense to talk of “economic incentives” in the usual sense or the provision of jobs or training in situations where people do not retain the fruit of their labours.

Communal obligation also means that social pressure to drink is similar to but much stronger than “peer pressure” in a white social setting. It also results in the small number of teetotallers being run ragged by their obligations to look after drunks and their children—and with the last generation of mission-educated grandmothers dying off, the families they have held together are likely to fall apart even further. Finally, obligations include support in disputes, so individual fights quickly turn into all-in ..."

Yep indod. It does seem to be a difficult for aboriginal people to meet the cultural obligations of two different communities. Especially in remote communities, where huge inequality puts a massive load on those with jobs to share that wealth.

I edited it crypto as that wasn't my wisest work.

CryptoKnight's picture
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CryptoKnight commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 11:43am

'Professional clinicians and human services providers are increasingly attributing the mental health problems of American Indians (AIs) to historical trauma (HT). As an alternative to established psychiatric disorders, AI HT was formulated to explain enduring mental health disparities as originating in tribal experiences of Euro-American colonization. As a result, AI 'HT has been described as the collective, cumulative, and intergenerational psychosocial disability resulting from massive group-based oppression, such as forced relocation, political subjugation, cultural domination, and genocide. One objective of the HT construct is to frame AI distress and dysfunction in social and historical terms. Given widespread indigenous experiences of colonization, the debilitating effects of HT are presumed to affect most AI communities today.'

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1363461513489722

The effects of the british empire's lies, and their bloody invasion and war on Indigenous Australians, and the atrocities that the british committed against Indigenous Australians, that is the murders, torture, rapes, abuse, imprisonment, exploitation and the widespread propaganda and lies the british empire concocted about Indigenous Australians, have had dramatic, complex effects on Indigenous Australians well being. As did the british decimation of, and the stealing of the Indigenous Australians home of at least 60,000 years. A once nurtured and revered, abundant, rich home, that Indigenous Australians felt and feel is the core of their very being.

That heinous event in human history, although just another genocidal, glorified blood bath in european and british history, even exceeded the Holocaust, in its prolonged, perpetuated, brute like attack on one group of humans. As there should be, in any culture claiming to be humane beings, there has been much, widespread study on the psychological effects of the Holocaust on the survivors, and the generations following them. That is not the case with the survivors of the british empire's bloody, heinous onslaught against Indigenous Australians. That pattern of arrogant, smarmy dismissal and disinterest follows the bloody, genocidal footprint left by european 'colonization' of this planet.

'Contrary to what is taught in modern history books, Native Americans were an
advanced culture deeply immersed in their environments. From the invasion by the Spanish in the 1400s to the scorched earth extermination policies of the United States in the 1800s, Native Americans endured attempted genocide, forced relocation and confinement to reservations and forced assimilation. Historical trauma is generational and dwells deep in the souls of Native American individuals and communities all across the United States. For any healing to take place, one must take a close look at the root cause of historical trauma for the Native American people.'

'To understand the Native American people it is important to have an understanding of the
environment in which they live, know their history, and know how this history has shaped them. It is equally important to understand and respect their worldview, which describes the thought process of a people or a culture. Native Americans were displaced from their traditional lands, their sacred sites were excavated, and their sacred objects were placed in private collections and museums. Their dead were exhumed from their traditional burial sites to make room for ranching and industry. Their artwork, which was never seen as separate from their culture, was commercially reproduced and modified for Western tastes. Traditional ceremonies and stories were depicted, usually inaccurately, in novels, movies, and on television. Their way of life was disrupted and they were forced to accept religious institutions whose dogmas were often in conflict with Native American values.

A variety of terms have been used interchangeably to refer to America’s indigenous
populations - “Indians,” “Native Americans,” “American Indians,” Native peoples.” The
problem of terminology began with Columbus. He was lost. The people he met were not Indians because he was not in India, but for six centuries these peoples have been called “Indians.” They are in fact many different peoples and many different nations with many different languages. To justify the use of “Indians”, which some scholars find offensive, I refer to Sherman Alexie’s remark during a reading in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 1993: “The white man tried to take our land, our sovereignty, and our languages. He gave us the word “Indian.” Now he wants to take the word “Indian” away from us too. Well, he can’t have it.”

'Thus it seems that Elie Wiesel (1978) was correct in stating that “time does not
heal all wounds; there are those that remain painfully open” (p. 222). While Holocaust
survivors and their families made every effort to continue their lives without being
constantly reminded of the terrible events of the past, traumatic memories kept
returning with all their accompanying emotions. As Judith Herman (1992) pointed out
in her book Trauma and Recovery; ”atrocities refuse to be buried” (p. 1). They keep
penetrating the conscious and unconscious minds of the survivors and their offspring
until they are properly remembered, mourned and worked through within a safe, healing
relationship.'

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.623.9640&rep=re...

'Research into post traumatic psychiatric morbidity has a long history. Since the first descriptions of “soldiers' heart” syndrome in the American Civil War, wars, natural catastrophes, mass fires and accidents, rape abuse, and torture have all added to our understanding of the effects of trauma on the human psyche.1-4 Despite the accumulating data and the magnitude of human suffering, the unique diagnostic categorization of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a “latecomer” in formal psychiatric classification systems.'

'This essay discusses the discriminatory content of the Compensation Laws (Wiedergutmachung) for Holocaust Survivors in West Germany. It explains how this was based partly on the lack of knowledge of the long-term after effects of psychic trauma, but even more so because of the unwillingness of German physicians to understand and accept the harm the Holocaust inflicted upon the survivors.'

http://www.jcpa.org/phas/phas-durst-f02.htm

'The impact of these past forcible removable practices on Australian Aboriginal peoples, both individually and collectively, has been immeasurable. Most Aboriginal families have been affected by the forcible removal of one or more children across generations, and this in turn has had a major impact on the cohesion of many Aboriginal communities.

While there has been no systematic research on the effects of the forcible removal of Aboriginal children, accurate accounts of the devastating impacts have been presented to the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from their Families (1997). The testimonies of 535 Aboriginal people throughout Australia who had been removed as children or had family members that were removed were provided to the Inquiry.'

'The impact of these experiences damaged the children who were forcibly removed, their parents and families, their communities and subsequent generations who continue to suffer the effects. Although there are many individual differences in reaction to trauma, for the majority of witnesses to the Inquiry the effects of forcible removal of children has been profoundly disabling. Psychological and emotional damage has led to low educational achievement, unemployment, poverty, self-harm, substance abuse and antisocial behaviour.'

'Bretherton and Mellor (2006) report that, although psychology was a relatively new field during the years when forcible removal practices were occurring, the psychologists who were available did not use their disciplinary knowledge to speak out against Aboriginal children being taken from their families. It appears that Australian psychology only started to more broadly provide respectful supports after the Bringing Them Home report was published.'

'It is imperative that psychologists working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people today have a deep understanding of the impact of the traumatic history of the Stolen Generations. The shameful forcible removal practices have resulted in intergenerational and unresolved trauma and there remains extreme sensitivity to this topic among Aboriginal people. Each Aboriginal person has his or her own unique story of how forcible removal practices have impacted on them and their families.

In order to work with Aboriginal people in a culturally safe, respectful and appropriate manner, psychologists should work towards becoming culturally competent.'

https://www.psychology.org.au/inpsych/2014/august/dudgeon/

We all know people who have traumatic events in lives and past, and we see different reactions. Some, as documented here, become deeply distressed, their lives destroyed, because they couldn't pay their rego. Others wouldn't blink about such a trivial thing. Some go red mist psycho, having surfed shit waves all day in paradise, stoned off their scones, after dropping in on a local. Their lives are then ruined, and it is all that they can do to stop themselves from mashing everyone in sight, for years on end!!! Driven by this mantra, they fight on bravely:

' i stared at her and tried to fathom what type of person would be so insensitive to anothers situation.Then i told her to "shut the fuck up , mole," and walked to my car.'

But then like a galah in a dunces hat, trained to make noises, and mimic others, they hop up and down, and screech at Indigenous Australians to 'just move on'... 'get over it'!!!

Even worse, Indigenous Australians are 'aided' by 'social workers' (sic) who proudly don dunces hats and claim:

'I'll be your social worker today, I love being a dunce, and I've got some awesome info me mmmaaayyytee, a part time electrician surfee, swillnut googled for me!!! Guess what, its not exactly your fault, well, it is, coz your fucking Culture is fucked... again! The quicker you lose it the better!!! Here, I'll help ya, I'll just get out from behind the m16's, I got me Blundstone steel caps on, cop this in the guts!!!'

Which generated even more sales, when it was re-released as 'walk this way'. No, no, not that way, this way... no, how many times do I have to tell you, this way!!! That's right, now you've got it, there's a good lad!!! Left right, left right, left right...

Poor blinder!!!

https://theconversation.com/indigenous-treaties-are-meaningless-without-...

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Blowin commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 12:28pm

Too true , Lifty.

After my ancestors were forcibly removed from their families and transported to another continent they struggled to overcome the trauma of the episode. Factor in that the entire premise of their punishment was based upon an insidious class war resulting from the advent of the Industrial Age and one must indeed question if the rise of industry was a good or a bad thing at all.

But while the exponential growth in humanity resulting from Industrialisation can be debated on its merits objectively , the simple fact of every new person lucky enough to be born at all cannot be dismissed as anything but a blessing.

The Industrial Age was possible due to the accumulation of capital amongst an elite . How the elite came to amass this capital is a tale with more than a few nefarious turns. It can’t be said that the course of history has always been pleasant for all involved as my chained ancestors removed from their place in the world and forced into servitude in an alien land can attest . But the history of the world cannot be altered and we must live with the outcome . But the news is in no way all bad. Australia today is not the same conflict ridden place of white vs black , convict vs queen and chained slave vs a new country.

Australia today is a land where every man and woman can wake up each day and make their own choices. Sometimes that choice is to accept defeat or to face the challenges that life provides. Black , white , refugee , children of welfare dependent drug addicts - all have situations in their lives that test their ability to cope or thrive and not all these situations are a result of the suffering persons own choices.

All we can do is give support to their current circumstance. Attempting to increase any pain felt by ensuring old wounds remain open and festering helps no one.

I personally feel that your continued attempts to paint the entire western world as inherently evil and without any saving graces whatsoever is not only offensive but entirely incorrect and probably illegal. There is not a single person I can think of that doesn’t believe that the proceeding inhabitants of Australia before colonialisation didn’t get utterly fucked over so I’m struggling to understand who you are trying to convince with your rants.

You wouldn’t be sitting in the town that you love if the English government hadn’t made the choices they made . 25000000 Australians wouldn’t be living in a country that is the envy of the rest of the world.

History moves on . You’re not sitting down the airport and yelling at Japanese, German and Italian tourists for what their relatives tried in WW2 are you mate ?

CryptoKnight's picture
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CryptoKnight commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 12:39pm

Wow, you read all those links pretty quick!!! Bullshit!!! Who's a bright boy!!!

You understood this trivial, insignificant little event so, so deeply. That trivial, insignificant little event you made such a heartfelt drama out of.

'Some go red mist psycho, having surfed shit waves all day in paradise, stoned off their scones, after dropping in on a local. Their lives are then ruined, and it is all that they can do to stop themselves from mashing everyone in sight, for years on end!!! Driven by this mantra, they fight on bravely:
' i stared at her and tried to fathom what type of person would be so insensitive to anothers situation.Then i told her to "shut the fuck up , mole," and walked to my car.'

But then like a galah in a dunces hat, trained to make noises, and mimic others, they hop up and down, and screech at Indigenous Australians to 'just move on'... 'get over it'!!!'

Maybe put more effort in, if it means so much to you. I did years of it. Had to prove that I really did. But, I understand you, real easy being a dunce.

'Thus it seems that Elie Wiesel (1978) was correct in stating that “time does not
heal all wounds; there are those that remain painfully open” (p. 222). While Holocaust
survivors and their families made every effort to continue their lives without being
constantly reminded of the terrible events of the past, traumatic memories kept
returning with all their accompanying emotions. As Judith Herman (1992) pointed out
in her book Trauma and Recovery; ”atrocities refuse to be buried” (p. 1). They keep
penetrating the conscious and unconscious minds of the survivors and their offspring
until they are properly remembered, mourned and worked through within a safe, healing
relationship.'

I deal with change daily. Its the cornerstone of my job, one not just based on googled opinion. I have a waiting list of people wanting to change. The truth is critical to real change. Beating around the bush, hiding from the truth, shows not really wanting to change.

STOP BULLSHITTING. And like the western world's blood bath history, dressed up like the walton's, if you don't want to wear it, stop.

https://theconversation.com/indigenous-treaties-are-meaningless-without-...

Sheepdog's picture
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Sheepdog commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 12:46pm

Blowin writes;
"I personally feel that your continued attempts to paint the entire western world as inherently evil and without any saving graces whatsoever is not only offensive but entirely incorrect and probably illegal."

Illegal???
In what aspect?

Sheepdog

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 2:53pm

Don’t you reckon it’s funny that you dismiss my knowledge cause you think I googled it whereas your knowledge has come from sitting through a theoretical cause in a lecture hall or done online ?

Yeah , my Parkinson’s afflicted brother is flying down to visit me in a couple of days. He’s so physically and mentally fucked over by the disease that he will be struggling to even get up the steps onto the plane let alone contemplate his future without breaking down . I’ll be looking after him for the rest of his life soon enough.

Maybe consider this when you try to lecture me about what I don’t understand about change , trauma and suffering.

Blackfellas got fucked over but it’s not a death sentence. They’ve got lives to lead and if they choose to waste their lives crying over the past then that’s their choice just as it’s their choice to get up tomorrow and accept the past and look to a better future just like everyone.

Your whole “ original inhabitants suffering is unparalleled “ line is utter bullshit. And your pointing the finger everywhere but yourself ain’t doing a single thing to improve their lives , it’s merely an excuse for you to bully others .

Now go and tell someone how to stretch their calf muscles and continue to imagine you’re the only decent person on Earth and you’re saving the world .

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 1:03pm

Sheepy - There are three essential components of this unlawful conduct:

1) The act must be done in public;
2) It must be reasonably likely to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate the people against whom it is directed; and
3) It must be done because of the race, colour or national or ethnic origin of the group against whom it is directed.

Yes , that is 90 percent of Lifty’s Swellnet posting covered.

CryptoKnight's picture
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CryptoKnight commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 1:11pm

On that note, see its not so bad for the Nungas! I have to go back to work. Another swillnut ex cop private detective after me!

AndyM's picture
AndyM's picture
AndyM commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 1:31pm

"western world's blood bath history"

Let's try "the world's bloodbath history".

Terminal's picture
Terminal's picture
Terminal commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 1:38pm

Wrapped it up AndyM, it continues to date and will continue as long as humans remain extant I feel. On a sidenote, a somewhat lacklustre spray from The Dux. I came here for fireworks and got a sparkler...

Sheepdog's picture
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Sheepdog commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 2:18pm

Uplift was SPECIFICALLY talking about the western world's bloodbath history, not "world bloodbath history". Now I love a good rumble with Lifty as much as the next pundit. But in this case, he is right, and you are nit picking, Andy. If we were chatting about Pol Pot, your point would be legitimate. But we're not.
The word "genocide" is thrown around a lot. The most successful genocide in Human history was right here in Australia, Tasmania to be exact. No full blood native tasmanians are left. Ever Australian should journey to Bruny Is in their lifetime, and learn.

Sheepdog

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Sheepdog's picture
Sheepdog commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 2:21pm

Australia in 1904;

Sheepdog

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 2:52pm

You reckon the photo of white convicts in chains from the same era would be any different ?

Many convicts were charged with trivial offences that they committed merely to survive .

Same same.

PS Sheepy - Lifty ain’t just railing against the western world . He’s railing against the English/ Dutch / Irish and their living Australian descendants. Cut and paste racism and bigotry. Insulting , offending , humiliating , bullying due to ancestry or heritage is illegal .

AndyM's picture
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AndyM commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 3:01pm

Disagree Sheepy, a large part of The Raw Boned Fella's schtick is to heap massive generalisations on English/Europeans/whites and play the noble savage card for Indigenous/First Nations.

No one can seriously disagree with Australia's recent past but blatant bigotry doesn't help anyone, I don't see it as encouraging people to get on board one of Australia's key issues and it just sets "the deified" up for a fall.

blindboy's picture
blindboy's picture
blindboy commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 3:41pm

Save your pity big boy. Happy as!

AndyM's picture
AndyM's picture
AndyM commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 3:50pm

Totally missed the point BB.

blindboy's picture
blindboy's picture
blindboy commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 4:14pm

.........which was? I was commenting on a personal reference Crypto made back there somewhere.

AndyM's picture
AndyM's picture
AndyM commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 4:33pm

.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 6:59pm

So Herc is basically putting the blame on intergenerational trauma.

Look even if it was an effect.

It still doesn't add up the Indigenous communities that have historically suffered the least impact from white fella are actually the communities with clearly the most problems (remote indigenous communities)

And those indigenous communities that could claim to have had the biggest problems, and could still claim to have the biggest race related problems are the ones with less problems.

IMHO intergenerational trauma maybe a factor in some cases, but to blanket it as the reason for a whole community etc is just a lazy explanation for current problems, that ignores dining deeper into the true root causes.

Pretty much every culture could claim to have some degree of intergenerational trauma if they liked, through all kinds of events, wars, colonisation etc even those ancestors of convicts could probably claim it.

happyasS's picture
happyasS's picture
happyasS commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 7:24pm

A good call editing that Indo. I sympathize with personal stories because I have my own like everyone but's its not quite the same thing when the neighbor you turn too for support isn't lying in a mess on the ground themselves.

Sheepdog's picture
Sheepdog's picture
Sheepdog commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 10:18pm

Blowin writes- "You reckon the photo of white convicts in chains from the same era would be any different ?"

Same "ERA"? 1904? Was England still transporting "white convicts" to Australia in 1904?
Pretty sure the convict "ERA" of Australian history ended in the mid 1800s.
But hey don't let a little fact like that spoil the story.

Sheepdog

CryptoKnight's picture
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CryptoKnight commented Monday, 3 Sep 2018 at 11:55pm

'As the title suggests, Liz Connor focuses particularly on print representations of Aboriginal women from the first instances of European exploration and settlement.

'Skin Deep argues that these representations were based on unfounded hearsay, yet they were circulated and reiterated until they became accepted as truth. In titling this review I took inspiration from one of the books opening lines (27):

[This] is a print history of settler impressions of Aboriginal women situated at that most potent juncture of racism and misogyny. This is a book of lies.'

'Dr Liz Conor is an ARC Future Fellow at La Trobe University, author of The Spectacular Modern Woman: Feminine Visibility in the 1920s (2004) and editor of the journal Aboriginal History. It took Conor over a decade to write Skin Deep, and this is evident in the wide-ranging subject matter, which spans hundreds of years and the entire Australian continent. In doing so, she hoped to stimulate non-Indigenous readers into reflecting on the insidious history of Europeans in Australia and how pervasive these manufactured “truths” have become.'

'This book was painstakingly researched over many years, and Conor’s deep engagement with the source material is a testament to this. Skin Deep continually highlights the ongoing relevance of the dark history Conor seeks to illuminate. This, I believe, is an important yet often forgotten element to writing history, particularly Australia’s colonial history.'

http://www.auswhn.org.au/blog/a-book-of-lies/

'Disagree Sheepy, a large part of The Raw Boned Fella's schtick is to heap massive generalisations on English/Europeans/whites and play the noble savage card for Indigenous/First Nations.'

No andrew, that's just more bullshit. I simply tell the truth about the incredible success Indigenous Australians achieved before the british empire's heinous invasion, and attempted genocide, as described above, by the highly respected author, 'the dark history', or, more specifically, 'the insidious history of Europeans in Australia'.

And, thank, God, because for one minute I thought that she said this, from another highly respected, highly researched literal masterpiece:

'Even toked on a joint at around the three hour mark'

'Then the red mist came over me
It was the assumed resentment of the women that really got me.
The smug superiority of some small minded no- one cunt moll that set me off. I turned to face Loud Mouth in front of his cunting piece of shit friends and with every ounce of will ,energy and misdirected anger from every point of my life i drove my fist into that cunt's putrid face and punched him to the sand.

Thank fuck i did not have a gun cause if i did i would have shot the cunt. The only thing that stopped me from kicking him till he twitched was some chick throwing herself over his prostrate form.'

https://www.swellnet.com/forums/wax/12736

No, andrew, if I didn't understand the concept of 'noble savage', I wouldn't have won those awards for my efforts. Still, it comes as no surprise that you, andrew, and your other swillnut self proclaimed dunces raise it, and then, andrew, swap at will between the following two strategies.

'Scholars have long recognised that both the noble and the brutal savage are fantasies of the European mind that kept Indigenous peoples in a suspended state of either elevated purity or perpetual evil.

The noble savage binds Indigenous peoples to an impossible standard. The brutal savage, by contrast, becomes the pre-emptive argument for Indigenous failings.'

https://theconversation.com/explainer-the-myth-of-the-noble-savage-55316

Because andrew, you know what plenty, well more than plenty are saying... young andrew, unless you are masquerading as dreaming...

'When Racism Masquerades as “Equality” '

Throughout most of Australia’s modern history white society has worked hard to make Indigenous Australians disappear. In the early days it took the brutal forms of “dispersion” and taking children from their families.

But a people can be made invisible in subtler ways. Aborigines were declared a dying race, written out of the history books, banned from speaking their languages, confined to missions and sent to the margins of towns. Some have been dismissed as too white to be black or, if too black, turned into cultural relics captured on ashtrays or infantilised as noble savages.

In recent decades Indigenous people have watched as the uncovering of this history of killing and exclusion has been whitewashed as a “black armband” view of Australian history, so that not only the act of wiping them out but the memory of it too must be denied.

For a people rendered invisible, one of the most powerful forms of protest at their disposal is simply to makes themselves visible, to become a constant reminder. Their mere presence disturbs the fiction of their disappearance, the more so if their presence is not a silent one. And so Aboriginal people have used every celebration of European settlement to remind white society that its achievements are built on an original theft.

Those who believe Indigenous people should disappear are discomforted, sometimes deeply, by expressions of Indigenous presence. This is Adam Goodes’s crime. His critics defend their position by insisting that Australia is an equal society and that Goodes and all Aboriginal people should be “like everyone else”.

Many of his critics would never consciously discriminate against Aboriginal people – they may even have some as friends – but the demand for sameness is a more insidious form of racism because it hides behind a moral principle that no one can dispute. The appeal to “equality” gives the subtler form of racism deniability.'

https://theconversation.com/when-racism-masquerades-as-equality-the-adam...

'Australia could achieve absolute decolonisation and shared sovereignty and live up to the reputation we like to have, as a nation deeply concerned with human rights and social justice.

It is wrong-headed to think of “embracing” Indigenous peoples. Those with a western heritage must relinquish their arrogance, rewrite the distortions of their history, and place Indigenous interests at the forefront of social, economic and political concern.

We need to look beyond symbols to restitution: compensation, reparations and resource sharing. Indigenous peoples, through seeking a treaty, invite us to share in building an honourable future. Surely we can agree that Australia is worth it.'

https://theconversation.com/indigenous-treaties-are-meaningless-without-...

'So Herc is basically putting the blame on intergenerational trauma.'

Nooo... no little dreamer... your dream of duncehood has really come true hasn't it!!!! Now, see, see.. now now, try to think, try, and look... myyy goodness... loooook... herc has basically just put quotes, that other highly respected people said, based on mountains of experience and work, also using the referenced work of other highly respected people!!!

STOP BULLSHITTING!!!

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 8:17am

@Happy

Yeah i edited the personal story, just because all Crypto would do is take it and cut and paste it on every post instead of sticking to the subject, so thought it was silly to encourage him, sad we have think like this.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 8:28am

@Herc aka Crypto

Im really interested in why remote indigenous communities have the highest level of all problems in indigenous communities compared to other indigenous communities.

Even though I've been talking about this area, you seem to avoid addressing why this is the case.

Could you please tell me why this is the case?

Why are the problems at there worst were, culture is at it's strongest, where old whiteys influence is minimal, where historically these areas have been least effected by old whitey, where racism and discrimination is more likely to be towards the odd non indigenous person than indigenous majority.

It's obviously an important areas to really understand the cause of the issues.

hayesb01's picture
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hayesb01 commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 1:49pm

@indo-dreaming Would you classify Halls Creek in north western WA as a remote indigenous community? It has been the site of some major issues and was a focus of the most recent government intervention.

only ask as I taught up there a few years back.

CryptoKnight's picture
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CryptoKnight commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 4:43pm

I only have a short break dreamer, but that's all that I'll need to answer your racist question. I served on the local advisory health board for some time, so the answer is common knowledge to anyone with genuine expertise, and interest in the area. Combine the facts below, with all the expertise and knowledge you dismissed earlier above re trauma of genocide etc for Indigenous Australians, and the answer is blantantly obvious, almost as obvious as your racist, delusional arrogance. To quote you, 'old whiteys influence is minimal', that statement is bullshit, the fact is, his alcohol's influence is maximal' and your quote, 'where historically these areas have been least effected by old whitey' is more bullshit, as his influence, his beloved grog is maximal in these areas. Your determined, continued, blinkered racism is disgusting to say the least, and does not belong in modern Australia.

'Queenslanders living and working in rural and remote communities experience different challenges to people living in urban areas. Distance, the financial environment and the weather all play a big part. The gap between health service deliveries is often quite wide in comparison to urban areas. Not surprisingly, these things can impact stress levels, mental health and social relationships. Risky drinking, domestic violence, road injuries, assault, and suicide are disproportionately higher in rural and remote communities than in regional and urban areas. In fact, the greater the distance you live from a major city, the greater the proportion of the population are drinking at risky levels.'

http://actonalcohol.org.au/facts/fact/rural-and-remote-communities/

'In Australia, the rate of alcohol misuse and alcohol related harm is disproportionately higher in rural areas than in urban areas in adults as well as adolescents. Adolescents who live in rural areas are over 80 per cent more likely than their urban counterparts to have used alcohol in the past month.

This is worrying because the earlier an individual starts using alcohol, the higher their risk of developing alcohol related problems in adulthood. The National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2013 Compared adolescents living in major cities to adolescents who live in rural Australia and found they were twice as likely to obtain their first drink from their parents. They were also three times more likely to be currently getting their alcohol from their parents. Parents who live in rural Australia were 50 per cent more likely to be heavy drinkers and 40 per cent more likely to drink at home.

The higher prevalence of drinking frequently and heavily in rural area suggests that the pro-drinking culture among parents in rural area is likely to be an important explanation of the rural and urban disparity in adolescent drinking.'

http://www.lyndon.org.au/tackling-adolescent-drinking-in-rural-areas/

'Some people who are depressed turn to alcohol to feel better. This is known as ‘self-medication’ and is a common but unsafe and ineffective coping strategy for farmers and other people living in rural and remote areas.

Research shows that farming men and women are more likely to consume alcohol at short-term risky levels (commonly described as binge drinking) when compared to the general Australian population. Men, in particular, consume more alcohol than is considered healthy. There is a strong link between excessive alcohol consumption, depression and suicide risk.'

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/rural...

'Rural people experience disproportionately high
levels of alcohol misuse and its associated burden
of disease and injury. This is due to a range of
factors characteristic of rural areas including
lack of venues for recreation, stoic attitudes
about help-seeking, economic and employment
disadvantage, and less access to healthcare
professionals and alcohol treatment services.'

'The AIHW has reported that among those living in rural
areas, men and youths are particularly likely to drink at
high-risk levels. Those working in the farming industry are
also more likely to drink at risky levels. Among farming
communities in rural Victoria, an estimated 54 per cent of
men and 22 per cent of women reported drinking at high
risk levels at least once a month compared to 20 per cent
for the general population.'

http://ruralhealth.org.au/sites/default/files/publications/nrha-factshee...

Your delusional behaviour interests me dreamer, could you please tell us why you think that intermediate traders have zero capital management skills, and why they keep no records or provide any to the the taxation department. Also, could you explain why you think that intermediate traders are unable to live off their expertise? you keep avoiding this, and it is pertinent as it highlights your continued delusional behaviour.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 5:02pm

@hayesb01

Ive never been there, but looking at a map, yes i would, and expect those who do statistics also do.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 5:10pm

100% alcohol makes things worse but is it the root cause?

Extremely doubtful.

We can test if it is, are these problems still at high levels in remote dry communities?

I will go read and see.

Im expecting problems are reduced by there is still lots of problems, because it's a cultural based problem, a social economic problem and yes in most cases fuel is added to the fire with Alcohol and other drugs.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 5:12pm

In regard to you question i am not a trader I'm an investor, and my mindset is even if i did trade, i wouldn't keep records of trades, but happy to pay tax on any profit once i cash out.

CryptoKnight's picture
CryptoKnight's picture
CryptoKnight commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 7:53pm

'In regard to you question i am not a trader I'm an investor, and my mindset is even if i did trade, i wouldn't keep records of trades, but happy to pay tax on any profit once i cash out.'

That is easily one of the most stupid things I have ever heard. Perhaps its because of your cultural background? Also, you insidiously avoided, again, the part about protecting capital, as an intermediate level chameleon 'investor/trader'. One such as you, who as you said, simply picks the market tops and bottoms and pockets the profits!!! Again, perhaps its a cultural thing? Volumes are written about delusion in the markets. As you so harshly discovered, delusion is quickly exposed there, and it is never recommended that delusional people such as yourself enter the market.

'100% alcohol makes things worse but is it the root cause?'

This comment demonstrates a complete lack of understanding, or comprehension. You have much, much reading to do.

Also you insidiously avoided, again, commenting on Dr Conor's hard, thorough work. All 10 years of it.

' [This] is a print history of settler impressions of Aboriginal women situated at that most potent juncture of racism and misogyny. This is a book of lies.'

'Dr Liz Conor is an ARC Future Fellow at La Trobe University, author of The Spectacular Modern Woman: Feminine Visibility in the 1920s (2004) and editor of the journal Aboriginal History. It took Conor over a decade to write Skin Deep, and this is evident in the wide-ranging subject matter, which spans hundreds of years and the entire Australian continent. In doing so, she hoped to stimulate non-Indigenous readers into reflecting on the insidious history of Europeans in Australia and how pervasive these manufactured “truths” have become.'

You have so much work to do. Then of course you insidiously avoided all of this. Perhaps it was just the delusions?

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1363461513489722

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.623.9640&rep=re...

http://www.jcpa.org/phas/phas-durst-f02.htm

https://www.psychology.org.au/inpsych/2014/august/dudgeon/

Of course for a topic so serious, including the future of our country, that's just a good start. You still have much, much more reading to do! And then of course how well you grasp all of the material, is another question, one you answered by explaining that you had 'life experiences'. I actually proved how well I grasped all of the reading. Basically, you couldn't be fucked. Which works wonders as a professional swillnut, but is worth, as your real world intermediate, expert trading showed, sweet fuck all.

Indigenous Australians are offering an amazing opportunity, for an equally amazing future. That you also cunningly avoid.

'Australia could achieve absolute decolonisation and shared sovereignty and live up to the reputation we like to have, as a nation deeply concerned with human rights and social justice.

It is wrong-headed to think of “embracing” Indigenous peoples. Those with a western heritage must relinquish their arrogance, rewrite the distortions of their history, and place Indigenous interests at the forefront of social, economic and political concern.

We need to look beyond symbols to restitution: compensation, reparations and resource sharing. Indigenous peoples, through seeking a treaty, invite us to share in building an honourable future. Surely we can agree that Australia is worth it.'

https://theconversation.com/indigenous-treaties-are-meaningless-without-...

There is no place in a truly fair, honest, advanced, civilized nation for insidious racism and lies, delusion, and brute like cunning dreamer.

CryptoKnight's picture
CryptoKnight's picture
CryptoKnight commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 8:17pm

'@hayesb01

Ive never been there, but looking at a map, yes i would, and expect those who do statistics also do'

Stop bullshitting dreamer.

'While alcohol
restrictions had not stopped family
violence, the evaluation found good
evidence that the severity and
incidence of family violence had
reduced significantly. In Halls Creek,
reported domestic violence decreased
in the twelve months following the
introduction of alcohol restrictions
(University of Notre Dame 2010b),
and there were similar decreases in
Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island
(Conigrave et al. 2007). '

Can you begin to comprehend the effects of genocide dreaming, just one part of the heinous, prolonged and perpetuated crimes that the British committed against Indigenous Australians. You are acting like a racist sleezeball. Piss off.

happyasS's picture
happyasS's picture
happyasS commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 8:46pm

......alcohol control, cashless welfare cards....comes at the expense of disempowerment of indigenous individuals.

Addressing one problem by creating another.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Wednesday, 5 Sep 2018 at 8:28am

Actually reading around there is so much conflicting bits and pieces on this area, i expected it to have a very positive impact but doesn't seem so clear cut.

I try to use that creative spirits website as a reference because its something you guys aren't going to question, but heaps of contradicting things there too.

https://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/health/aboriginal-alc...

Basically from what i read, yeah if it could be done properly alcohol would reduce problems, but in reality it's not the problem, it's more just like adding fuel to the fire.

You still ignore the roots causes, culture and social economic disadvantage, but there is so many contradicting aspects to these two things.

For instance there is clear solutions to helping social ecomic disadvantage, but these solutions could also be seen as culture destroying

This was the route Tony Abbott was suggesting in closing down communities basically forcing remote indigenous to more built up areas where there is better education, health, employment, assimilation etc

100% it would drastically help many issues seen by those in remote communities.

But the flip side is this is viewed as culture destroying which it kind of is taking people from their homes and traditional lands and even i was surprised Tony proposed closing down these communities, and i don't think its the right thing to do, i think people should be given incentives to move rather than forced.

But the flip side is the reality is no one is really living a traditional life or wants to live a traditional lifestyle, so you have communities who want some aspects of the modern world but not other aspects and no real realistic opportunity to move forward in a modern type of life that they are now participating in, in particular the need for money and employment and other services like education and health which are never going to happen in small remote communities that are not sustainable.

100% no easy answers or no politically correct answers anyway.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 4 Sep 2018 at 9:34pm

Oh and sorry, i have apparently been to Halls Creek according to Herc I'm bullshitting, Herc knows it all, even knows where I've been now.

And in regard to how i view tax payed on crypto, i am not at all alone.

Tell me why i should pay tax on trades when end of the day i might even cash out at a loss, so you expect me to pay tax on my own money and a loss?

Do you think people are that stupid?

100% if i cash out at a profit, I'm happy to pay tax on the profit but not a loss or my own money that I've already paid tax on.

And once again this is not my own unique view, its the default view shared by most.