Interesting stuff

Blowin's picture
Blowin started the topic in Friday, 21 Jun 2019 at 8:01am

Have it cunts

GuySmiley's picture
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GuySmiley commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 9:25am

Ball cupping could become an Olympic sport at this rate

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fitzroy-21 commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 9:32am

Christ VB, you are a belittling shit. I am fully aware that he was sacked due to breaching the code of conduct. A man of his calibre must be pretty staunch though to risk his career to repeatedly breach the code due to his concerns for JCU’s research quality control.
Now fast forward to today. It appears that his concerns may be well founded and hold some merit going by the allegations made in those three articles. It appears that it is not only the scientist, but supervisors involved. If it has happened once, chances are it isn’t a one off.
Conspiracies? Really?

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GuySmiley commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 10:19am

Been meaning to ask for awhile now, any news on how Blindboy is going with these fires, don’t know what part of the south coast he calls home. Stu?

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 11:03am

Interesting people so freely using the term ball cupping, its not a term id use as some may see it as a homphbic slur when implying it between men.

But hey the left make the rules on these things, so if its okay i guess its okay

Personally i have respect for Fitzroy when it comes to this topic as its obviously an area that in a sense he lives and breaths and has more first hand experience in than us, so yeah im interested in what he has to say and what others in his circle have to say especially when it goes into the real observation aspect.

But honestly i cant be bothered getting involved in the topic again though, but yeah my comment was a bit, hey im not commenting but you are not alone in your view kind of thing...call it ball cupping if you will, im cool with that.

vascectomy-blottmouth's picture
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vascectomy-blot... commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 11:01am

Oh absolutely fitzroy, I'm a belittling smart arse. That's why I exist, to take the piss. Blowin brings flat out aggression and swearing to his thread that's not supposed to devolve into insult. I bring snark and smart arsery.

As for the allegations, totally. Dodgy shit. Thousands of articles get published by thousands of scientists every year..
And there's a few dodgy ones. And just like the anti vax stuff from 1998... It gets found out pretty quickly so we know we can rely on the others. And rely on the system.

Still doesn't show ridd got sacked for his views tho. That's bullshit.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 11:08am

Actually the whole point is we can't rely on the system, because the system doesn't allow for studies to be replicated and properly fact checked, the peer review system is actually pretty poor system, its basically a system where scientist skim through a study one arvo and say yeah ok looks good, nah this one doesn't look good etc

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vascectomy-blot... commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 11:20am

Yeah thats all it is. You know from that time u did that science eh man.

Those articles never get reviewed or challenged after theyre published. Just some one goes... Yeah that'll do. And it's gospel.

But if you got a gripe with replication u gotta look deeper then peer review cos that ain't stopping replication.

But hang on there Indonesian dreams, youre all about that solution... So what's ur solution to this one? Something something get rid of the Left/greenies etc?

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Blowin commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 12:03pm

What’s this shit ? No one should be netting enclosed waters full stop. The justification that this is traditional based on a netting culture which began in the 1800’s is absolutely ridiculous.

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/revived-cultural-fishing-practices-a...

Get some fishing rods or use a spear.

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Blowin commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 12:35pm

Doesn’t get anymore unambiguous than this....

From Macrobusiness ( highly recommended , non-biased holistic overviews of Australian politics and economics)

“Yesterday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison was quizzed by the media on whether the government intended to meet Australia’s emissions targets as laid-out under the Paris Agreement, and promised to go even further:

Australia has pledged to cut emissions by 26 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030, under the Paris Agreement.

“It is my intention to meet and beat that target,” Mr Morrison told the public broadcaster.

“In the years ahead we are going to continue to evolve our policy in this area to reduce emissions even further and we are going to do it without a carbon tax, without putting up electricity prices and without shutting down traditional industries.”

Asked whether he was open to moving the existing target, he said: “What I’m saying is we want to reduce emissions and do the best job we possibly can and get better and better and better at it.”

Let’s cut the bull. Australia will never meet its emissions target while it continues to grow its population by around one million people every three years via mass immigration.

As shown in the next chart, which plots the ABS’ medium (Panel B) population projections, Australia’s population will hit around 43 million people by 2066, 17.5 million more than what would occur under zero net overseas migration (NOM):

That’s an enormous number of extra people consuming resources and emitting greenhouse gasses. It also means that Australia would need to cut its per capita emissions by around two-thirds just to keep total emissions at current levels (other things equal), let alone reduce them.

Don’t just take my word for it. Last year, lecturers at Deakin University also laid bare the impossibility of Australia meeting its emissions target:

In signing the Paris Climate Agreement, the Australian government committed to a global goal of zero net emissions by 2050. Australia’s promised reductions to 2030, on a per person and emissions intensity basis, exceed even the targets set by the United States, Japan, Canada, South Korea and the European Union.

But are we on the right track to achieve our 2030 target of 26-28% below 2005 levels? With one of the highest population growth rates in the developed world, this represents at least a 50% reduction in emissions per person over the next dozen years.

Consider the impact of one sector, the built environment. The construction, operation and maintenance of buildings accounts for almost a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions in Australia. As Australia’s population grows, to an estimated 31 million in 2030, even more buildings will be needed.

In 2017, around 18,000 dwelling units were approved for construction every month. Melbourne is predicted to need another 720,000 homes by 2031; Sydney, 664,000 new homes within 20 years. Australia will have 10 million residential units by 2020, compared to 6 million in 1990…

In May 2018, a University of Adelaide-led study entitled Implications of Australia’s Population Policy for Future Greenhouse Gas Emissions Targets noted the direct (obvious) link between population size, emissions and environmental degradation:

It is clear from our demographic modelling and the available data on net overseas migrants that Australia’s future population is entirely contingent on its immigration policies… The current demographic state of the Australian population is such that if all net immigration were halted today, the population would stabilize by the mid-2040s and decline only slightly thereafter, achieving nearly the same population size that it is today by mid-century…

Whether Australians choose to limit their future population growth is entirely another matter. The country’s natural systems have already suffered severe degradation of ecosystems…

In this context, any policy that seeks an even larger Australian population would need to be carefully focused on how to achieve this goal sustainably, while mitigating (and, in some situations, reversing) these threatening processes. Given the rising environmental damage globally from a large and growing human population (Bradshaw & Brook 2014), Australia has the rare option to limit this damage by adjusting its immigration policies accordingly…

Based on current population policies, the projected growth in the Australian population will make its already challenging future emissions-reduction goals even more difficult to achieve. In addition to the rising pressure of Australia’s population on its ecosystems, the country’s future greenhouse gas emissions are also partially tied to its immigration policy…

With a 2020 target of 5 per cent reduction in emissions (relative to 2000), a 27 per cent reduction by 2030 (relative to 2005) and potentially an 80 per cent reduction by 2050, Australia has no credible mechanisms in place to achieve these goals… it seems unlikely that Australia will be able to achieve either of these two targets without substantial policy changes across population, energy, agriculture and environmental sectors.

Given that Australia has less than 14 years to meet the 2030 target, and less than 34 years to meet the putative 2050 target, and that a reduction in per capita emissions of 83.5 per cent would still be required even under the extreme scenario of no net migration…

Irrespective of these challenges, any increase in Australia’s population will make these targets even more difficult, such that a business-as-usual projection (scenario 1) would require a fivefold greater reduction in per capita emissions to reach a 2050 target of 80 per cent reduction compared with the zero-immigration scenario and produce ~10 per cent more emissions…

More population growth driven by immigration will hamper Australia’s ability to meet its future climate change mitigation commitments and worsen its already stressed ecosystems, unless a massive technological transformation of Australia’s energy sector is immediately forthcoming.

And let’s not forget that it’s not just Australia’s emissions that are being made worse via never-ending mass immigration, but also the destruction of Australia’s natural habitat. Let’s recall what the latest federal government State of the Environment report said on the matter, via The Conversation:

Australia’s population growth and economic activity continue to pose major environmental challenges, according to a comprehensive five-yearly stocktake of the country’s environmental health.

The federal government’s State of the Environment 2016 report (prepared by a group of independent experts, which I chaired), released today, predicts that population growth and economic development will be the main drivers of environmental problems such as land-use change, habitat destruction, invasive species, and climate change…

We continue to lose agricultural lands through urban encroachment. Over the past five years land-clearing rates stabilised in all states and territories except Queensland, where the rate of clearing increased.

Coastal waterways are threatened by pollutants, including microplastics and nanoparticles…

Population growth in our major cities, along with Australia’s reliance on private cars, is leading to greater traffic volumes, which increase traffic congestion and delays as well as pollution…

While Australia’s emissions undoubtedly depends on many factors – including our energy use patterns, exports, and how we live – nobody can deny the fact that Australia’s mass immigration policy will make it next to impossible to meet our targets nor safeguard Australia’s environment.

Australia needs to support the Paris Agreement on emissions reduction if it expects other nations to do so. Yet, immigration-fuelled population growth is clearly threatening our ability to meet these targets. This is an indisputable fact ignored by the commentariat.”

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Westofthelake commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 12:46pm

I thought the below comment was interesting from one of Blowin's articles re Dr Gerd Schroeder-Turk. It might need some fact checking (Indo?) but nevertheless the premise remains, the Privatisation of the university system is a massive bi-partisan rort. (I think it's a bit ironic that the 'tyrannical' University is named 'Murdoch'.)

"We have 712,000 foreign students & partners onshore.

615,000 as primary applicants.
Then another 58,000 as secondary ‘partners’ no English test or attendance, and with full work rights.
Plus another 39,000 on scholarship, DFAT & special visas. (DHA as of March 2019).
Add on 7% YTY growth & it is close to 772,000 now..

Of that 715,000 March 2019 figure, 90% or 640,000 were in Sydney or Melbourne (ABS)

Occupying density of over twice the normal Australian occupancy density – at least 6 per dwelling which is at over 120,000 modest ex Australian dwellings, typically now foreign criminal syndicate owned and run as owned migrant only cash in hand bunk share.
There’s your Sydney/Melbourne housing bubble & 116,000 Australians permanent homeless & another 340,000 seeking affordable housing.

Living in vast festering squalor migrant only slums living and working illegally on these ‘foreign student’ visa alibis.
Yes. Over 75% work illegally (Sydney Uni & UTS study) So they have stolen over 540,000 Australia jobs, cash in hand no tax paid.
Their impact in Australian youth & mature age unemployment costs over $9.3 billion alone.

Most are not doing high level university degrees.
The vast bulk are doing low level easily cheated course or high school level ‘business study’ or child level ‘English courses’ available for free online or in their home country.
And they are not an ‘export’.
They come in poor & in debt to a foreign agent procurer & loan shark. Only the first semester is paid.
They are here only to live & work illegally.
Their fees are paid from money earned here, mostly illegally. And the rest is to pay to live illegally in fetid migrant only cash in hand bunkshare, or to send that illegally earned money out to repay the foreign agent procurer & as remittances to their third world families.

They lower wages & conditions for all Australians.

They create housing contention, increased cost of living, congestion and are the epi-centre of the vice trade (vice work no ID cash in hand is a legal income source for a foreign student or partner in NSW).

They are a negative social & economic impact.

They are only here to live & work illegally, to try and secure a PR and to be an anchor for chain migration.

Segregated university campuses, sham courses, widespread cheating & falsification of attendance & outcomes.
Widespread corruption, bribes & payments to the administration & so called teachers.
Segregated colleges & institutes providing nonsense courses with certificates & diplomas with no international recognition.
Even our secondary & now primary schools corrupted with the ‘foreign student’ visa alibi.

-/-

My point.
Anyone who has ever been inside a foreign student campus or knows the industry knows that its corrupted from top to bottom.

Where is the ethics & integrity in the 40,000 or so participant teachers, lecturers, office administrators etc in this sham facade?
They all know the score.
Classes with 25 -30 enrolled but only 5-10 attending after the first few weeks of the semester. The tezvgess and office staff taking cash as expected income to mark off the roll or pass assignments. Ghost colleges not even bothering to pretend it provide education.

Classes full of Asian end of life vice workers, Indian & Bangla cleaners & car washers, Nepalese McDonald servers, the criminal offspring of the Middle East & South America, their attendant pimp or illegally working partners.
Australian education standards falling thru the floor.

And the outcomes stand as testimony to the farce.

Only 3.6% of these ‘foreign students’ ever achieving a high income professional vocation in Australia or theyr home country.
96% fail to even achieve an Australian or average income or a true professional vocation.
(Migrant Pathways & Outcomes a Decade on Report 2016).
Even the Productivity Commission stated that foreign student were ‘not a suitable PR intake’.
-/-
So.
Where is the full page ad in the major newspapers and online signed by hundreds of the chancellors, teachers & staff in exposing this totally corrupted foreign student third world migrant guestworker visa racket?"

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 12:56pm

That’s what the initial article is about.....Murdoch University making an example of a whistleblower by financially destroying his family.

This is Australia’s University system !

Too much money at stake.

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Blowin commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 1:00pm

Waiting for a new board to be delivered to my door sometime today...

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simba commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 1:40pm

Mini mal ?..jokes Blowin jokes....so what brand....pyzel ?

simba

Westofthelake's picture
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Westofthelake commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 1:44pm

Rumour has it...cheap too eh.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 1:50pm

Pyzel Ghost.

Sorry to disappoint the local shaper support groups out there . Feedback I’ve been getting on them is too good to ignore.

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udo commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 2:02pm

With 6x6x4 and delivery Tad over 1K ?

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Blowin commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 2:12pm

No tail pad = Free delivery.

$925 = expensive. Fingers crossed it’s as good as they say. A single nice tube , a clean carve and it’s paid for itself

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Island Bay commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 2:59pm

Good luck, Blowin.

It's a great board. Just fixed mine up the other day: minor ding repair, a good clean, and new wax job. Waves got good here just after :-)

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sypkan commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 11:05pm
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sypkan commented Monday, 13 Jan 2020 at 11:16pm
thermalben's picture
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thermalben commented Tuesday, 14 Jan 2020 at 3:25pm

And in another episode of "what kind of tree is that?" I discovered that I've got a big supply of mangos down the back of the house. First time its had fruit in four and a half years! There's around three dozen of 'em soon to be gorged upon.

AndyM's picture
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AndyM commented Tuesday, 14 Jan 2020 at 3:35pm

See you in an hour Ben!

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thermalben commented Tuesday, 14 Jan 2020 at 3:44pm

Shit, I really didn't think about the ramifications of that last post.

Luckily, I have a hive of attacking bees who have been trained to protected life, limb and property. And old single fins.

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simba commented Tuesday, 14 Jan 2020 at 3:49pm

yeah Ben mangoes dont like rain when they flower so best ones come from you guessed it ,dry before xmas....look good too eh.....

simba

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AndyM commented Thursday, 16 Jan 2020 at 8:56pm

Just in case there was any doubt as to the depths of corruption and nepotism at the highest levels of government.

Even if people totally disagree with the concept of AGW, it should be impossible to ignore the network of LNP links and contacts that Michael West digs up, and what this means for Australia.

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Blowin commented Thursday, 16 Jan 2020 at 9:43pm

Peak corruption ?

You ain’t seen nothing when crew are blatantly getting away with this shit....

“Drought-stricken rural Queenslanders are outraged after the Southern Downs Regional Council approved a Chinese-owned mine to extract nearly 100 million ­litres of local groundwater a year for commercial plastic bottling, at the same time as residents are being placed on extreme water restrictions and the Southern Queensland town of Stanthorpe is relying on trucked-in water:

The Chinese-owned Royal Duke Holdings… has succeeded in winning approval for its groundwater mining venture on various conditions, including upgrading nearby roads.

According to its application to council, the company wants to build a “water extraction and distribution facility” using underground water from a fractured rock aquifer and sell the product to commercial water bottlers on the Gold Coast…

The approval came as the council was preparing residents to get used to using just 80 litres of water per person a day and to adopt practices such as three-minute showers and washing clothes only every third day…

Local property owner and fourth-generation cattle farmer Andrew O’Dea, who lives about 5km from the proposed water extraction site, said he was “pretty gutted” by the council’s decision.

“This mine is going to have a severe impact on our groundwater supplies,” he said. “With the conditions the region is experiencing at the moment, I expected a different outcome.”

Mr O’Dea said he and other landholders opposing the venture were given no notice that the council was about to make a decision on the water mine application and urged the state government to intervene.
“There is no excuse to justify taking 96 million litres of water a year out of the aquifer. The risk is just too high,” he said.

This makes no sense. Trucking in water for the locals whilst giving a Chinese owned company permission to take vast amounts of water from the underground water supply to sell environmentally destructive bottled water on the Gold Coast.”

Is this just corruption or is there an element of treason involved ? Either way , shit will get way worse until some evil greedy fucks are put up against the wall and shot. That might put a slight downer on the current tendency for unapologetically blatant political corruption.

AndyM's picture
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AndyM commented Thursday, 16 Jan 2020 at 9:41pm

Just started about three different comments but basically I just don't know what to say anymore.

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tubeshooter commented Thursday, 16 Jan 2020 at 11:43pm

There's corruption on the highest floor
Sun Green .. Neil Young https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyReihTTHEc

_Simon's picture
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_Simon commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 12:19am

Put you hands on your head

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Ralph commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 10:17am

@Blowin Pyzel Ghost.

Hi.

Which glassing option did you go for? "Indo Glassing 6x4x6" ?

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soggydog commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 10:10am

Haven’t the Greens been calling for a strong federal ICAC for some time now in the senate Blowin? Those crazy leftards. (Not supported by LNP or Labour,)

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I focus commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 11:41am

Labor's federal ICAC proposal knocked back by Government, as Coalition argues lack of detail

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-23/labor-federal-icac-proposal-knock...

Labor promises federal integrity commission if it wins next election

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/jan/30/labor-promises-fe...

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GuySmiley commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 12:37pm

Tubeshooter, Sun Green, nice, saw NY & Crazy Horse perform Greendale in Melbourne, front row!

I’m going to wager we will not have a Federal ICAC with real powers to investigate politicians and their staff until we have a change of government and only then if the cross benches insist on giving it real power, the LNP are totally untrustworthy on this and labor might be tempted to go light on the investigative powers.

Let’s face reality, if we had a federal ICAC now at least 1/2 the Nationals in parliament would be facing jail time and people like Tim Wilson would also be out on his arse.

How good is Australia? How good is Scotty?

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Waldorf Salad commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 2:31pm
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Blowin commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 3:38pm

Okay ....I’ve mastered putting photos up here . Now how do I put YouTube clips on instead of just the link ?

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sypkan commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 4:53pm

CNN is a banana, selling a pear...

Consequently, when the CNN moderators gave Sanders the Trump treatment, the outraged ululations of the Left could be heard from sea to shining sea. Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi tweeted, “This is an unusually vile performance by CNN.” The Nation’s Elie Mystal raged, “Jesus Christ I hate these biased questions from the moderators. ‘How would you keep your plan from bankrupting the country?’ JUST ASK THE KOCH BROTHERS TO MODERATE NEXT TIME!” HuffPost’s Zach Carter griped about CNN’s post-debate panel discussion, “CNN’s crew is just straight bashing Sanders post-debate.” The New Republic’s Libby Watson whined, “CNN is truly a terrible influence on this country.”

Hmm … Where have we heard that before? Oh, that’s right. Conservatives have been making the same point for decades, only to be sneered at by progressives who insisted that such claims were conspiracy theories. In reality, it has long been obvious that CNN operates more like the PR department for the Democratic National Committee (DNC) than a legitimate news outlet. The last time Sanders ran for president, CNN commentator Donna Brazile gave Hillary Clinton advance copies of debate questions during the Democratic primary. It was CNN’s Candy Crowley who jumped in to back up erstwhile President Barack Obama on a brazen lie about Benghazi during a debate with Mitt Romney."

https://spectator.org/sanders-supporters-shocked-to-find-bias-at-cnn/

"...After the debate, Trump fans online were in full schadenfreude mode, crowing about how “the left” finally understood that CNN really is fake news. Overall, #CNNisgarbage trended and #fuckCNNwasn’t far behind.

If the network doesn’t see trouble in this, it’s delusional. Voters on both sides of the aisle have changed since the Bernard Shaw days. They pay more attention to media manipulations, and it doesn’t get much more manipulative than punching above the facts to advance transparent political narratives, which is a new and accepted habit in the commercial news landscape.

We’ll find out in Iowa and New Hampshire what Democratic Party voters believe about that Warren-Sanders meeting, but that grimy story pales in comparison to the bigger picture: Episodes like this are why people hate the media."

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/political-commentary/january-democ...

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sypkan commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 5:01pm

I honestly do not know how they are even allowed to operate anymore.

what happened to the jounalists oathe or whatever it is?

"...Which, of course, is absolutely true — just as it is absolutely true that President Trump, the clear target of the drive, is a habitual liar and an unreconstructed narcissist. The trouble is . . . so is CNN. With the possible exception of the hallucinatory MSNBC, no other institution..."

"...This regrettable mania has not only pushed CNN to indulge whatever rumors happened to be running around Twitter that day, it has provoked serious mistakes from within. One of those mistakes, the publication of a story that claimed that Congress was investigating a “Russian investment fund with ties to Trump officials,” was predicated upon a single anonymous source and represented such a serious breach of protocol that its three authors were forced to resign. Among the other false stories promulgated were that a CIA asset had needed to be extracted from Russia in 2017 because President Trump had put him in danger (Trump hadn’t); that James Comey was set to tell Congress that President Trump had lied when he said that Comey had told him he was never personally under investigation (Comey didn’t); that President Trump’s lawyers had edited Michael Cohen’s 2017 testimony before Congress and thereby suborned perjury (they had not); and that President Trump and his campaign had been granted early access to the hacked DNC emails, before they were made public (this didn’t happen). It is true, of course, that human beings make mistakes. But that all of CNN’s mistakes have gone in one direction, and on one subject, is telling. When all you have is a hammer . . .

It remains hard to escape the conclusion that CNN considers its main role to be as part of the “Resistance.” In August, the network hired former acting director of the FBI Andrew McCabe as a contributor, despite his having been fired from the agency after a report from the Justice Department’s inspector general that showed he had leaked information to the press and then lied to investigators to cover it up, and it continues to publish articles that presume or assert things for which there is simply no evidence. In reaction to the Horowitz report — a devastating document that highlights routine abuse at the FBI and in the FISA courts, and cuts off at the knees the idea that the investigation of Carter Page was based upon serious data — CNN published an “analysis” by Katelyn Polantz that insisted that “many of the claims by Steele, a former British spy, have held up over time, or have proven to be at least partially true.”

Bananas, apples, kumquats, whatever.

Watching CNN try to push an obvious political agenda while retaining sufficient space for plausible deniability is akin to watching a two-year-old child try to steal a much-coveted chocolate bar without getting caught by his parents; one can only shake one’s head and laugh at the incompetence."

https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2019/12/31/cnn-is-not-a-news-net...

ÇNN think they are the goodness of an apple, but no, in reality they are just bananas, selling lemons

_Simon's picture
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_Simon commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 5:04pm

Put your hands on your hips

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 5:06pm

@blowin

just click on share and cut and paste embedded link

Then after posting refresh page for it to show here.

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sypkan commented Friday, 17 Jan 2020 at 8:19pm

how's this wonderful big ball of humanity...

https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2624296017816070&id=15252562143867...

https://internasional.kompas.com/read/2020/01/17/15141531/ulama-isis-ber...

interesting our media aren't interested...

don't want to be fatist maybe

simba's picture
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simba commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 6:32am

Candidate for jenny craig ?

simba

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Eugene Green commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 4:59pm

Interesting how overweight people are part of the list of protected species in our new woke culture.. Consuming more than your fair share and not pulling your weight so to speak, is the reason they are fat and that’s not a very “progressive” way to live. Fatties, especially fat women are celebrated as “brave” beautiful and “empowered” or a“great role model for young girls”
Strange times.

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GuySmiley commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 6:10pm

EGreen, too easy. I worked for a time assessing claims for disability retirement. Let me say there is most commonly a direct link between morbid obesity and depression, one making the other worse in a downward cycle.

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Eugene Green commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 8:26pm

Chicken/egg.
Why celebrate it though? These people need help and support. Maybe some tough love. Not coddling.

AndyM's picture
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AndyM commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 9:00pm

GS, any thoughts on how, as a society, we should address the issue of obesity?

Normalising it doesn't seem helpful.

sypkan's picture
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sypkan commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 9:33pm

"Normalising it doesn't seem helpful."

that's essentially all we've done

sure doesn't seem helpful

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sypkan commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 9:36pm

and it seems the whole fat is happy narrative is just an exercise in self delusion

https://amp.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/rebel-wilson-flaunt...

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GuySmiley commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 10:13pm

Andy, I have some thoughts but truthfully they are as uninformed as the next person's. Reading the medical reports there was great sadness and pain in these people's lives and loneliness. They had the tough love suggested above from family, at school, work and everywhere in-between. I guess I just want to say obesity isn't just a physical illness there is mostly always an emotional fragility or mental illness also at play. Show some kindness rather than judgement.

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sypkan commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 10:36pm

I think we can avoid the judgement of individuals whilst making judgement of what we are doing as a society

and that is developing a culture of enabling - enabling everything - not just obesity

a culture that constantly looks the other way, a culture that must look the other way, a culture that cannot point out the blloody obvious, no matter how damaging the obvious may appear to be

no matter how much a person embraces the empowerment of 'body positivity', losing a few kilos will make them feel better

just seems to be the wrong message to be peddling to kids for me

AndyM's picture
AndyM's picture
AndyM commented Saturday, 18 Jan 2020 at 10:58pm

Yeah I think the interconnections between modern lifestyle, modern food, psychology, physiology, societal pressures etc are things we're going to be unraveling for a long time.