Climate Change Research

blindboy's picture
blindboy started the topic in Wednesday, 25 Apr 2018 at 10:07am

I thought I might again.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 8:27am

Okay fair call if are are talking about the mining aspect, i doubt that what BB had in mind though.

His type wouldn't let anyone dig a hole deeper than 3ft if it was up to him, old guy in the bush with metal detector is probably part of the enemy.

Laurie McGinness's picture
Laurie McGinness's picture
Laurie McGinness commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 8:50am

Ha ha and you would leave the place looking like a block of Swiss cheese!

freeride76's picture
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freeride76 commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 8:59am

what beaches are up for sand mining ?

GuySmiley's picture
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GuySmiley commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 9:54am

Talking about a dog's breakfast, anyway I'm reassured that you now say you're in favour of our emissions falling, that is, until you next say you're not or infer its not worth the trouble or similar poo-washing.

Laurie McGinness's picture
Laurie McGinness's picture
Laurie McGinness commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 10:11am

Now in terms of that 3ft hole Indo you will need planning permission, a perimeter fence, warning signs, dust control, an approved sediment relocation plan, an emergency response plan and a brown paper bag filled with the readies or mate, that hole is just not happening.

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 4:53pm

Beach sand is no good. What’s sought is the eroded hinterland.

An example below . . It lies just behind the suburbs of Yanchep in WA . Only covered in low scrub , Indo. No massive environmental approval , though that process is still being undertaken. Simply remove generic scrub , scoop it sand , process through a mechanical system not much more complicated than a concrete batch plant. Then ship to China !

Seriously, Australia is going to get raped on this resource. There is one tenement in QLD which Mitsubishi bought outright.

The project below has 100 year resource and China is sniffing already. Share price in this company has doubled in a month. Only just beginning.

Australian government needs to reserve this resource for domestic production of the solar products / computer screens that will be the rubber / Coal / LNG style nation- maker of the next century.

Of course we won’t. We will sell it for pennies on the pound and a handful of spivs will get filthy rich whilst the rest of us enjoy our job “ flexibility “ as Uber drivers . Right up until automated cars replace us and then we can fight over the tailings of rubbish dumps !

All 50.000,000 of us !

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 8:48pm

The thing that shits me about climate change is the hypocrisy and energy wasted on finger pointing and sermonising as opposed to TRUE direct action.

You want to make a difference ?

Stop pissing in people’s pockets about how our nation’s contributions to the problem aren’t so infinitesimal so as not to matter and realise that your own personal contributions to the problem aren’t so infinitesimal as not to matter.

Instead of whining online , go and plant a garden . Grow your own veggies , herbs and fruit. Learn to catch your own fish. Compost your garden. Plant a tree. Use less consumer shit.

If you don’t think that this matters or makes a difference then you’ve got zero idea and not a single ounce of credibility on the topic.

You are the problem as much as any corporate director or minister who doesn’t make the effort in the avenues available to them. It all matters.

Advocating the egging of politicians is not direct action. Marching in the street is not direct action. Making alterations to your own life and the way you affect the planet is direct action.

Otherwise you are no different to Coles supermarkets. Bleating about their virtuous discontinuance of plastic bags whilst simultaneously advertising the new range of plastic mini consumer items they’re flogging to kids .

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Sunday, 14 Jul 2019 at 11:36pm

Blowin "If you don’t think that this matters or makes a difference then you’ve got zero idea and not a single ounce of credibility on the topic."

Total BS Blowin on issues like CC or more importantly ocean pH changes its actually policy and regulation that matters or that moves the numbers to where they should be.

Note your argument is a very old tool used by various political nasties to obfuscate.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 7:24am

The only thing being obfuscated is the fact that people would rather talk than act.

You do realise that it’s possible for both governments and individuals to take responsibility don’t you ? And that it’s just a matter of governments forcing individuals to act through policy and legislation, so why not just do the right thing now before you are forced to ?

Take responsibility where you can if you genuinely give a rat’s arse .

Every bit helps. The longest journey begins with a single step etc etc

Or don’t. Don’t act . Don’t do anything. Keep on acting like the effects of humanity on the environment is anything more than the accumulation of the effects of billions of individuals not giving a fuck.

But if you CHOOSE not to do anything you can within your personal power to improve the situation then don’t bother getting on your computer to belittle anyone else on the subject.

Obfuscate....FFS. Fancy someone daring to mention that the issue you believe is the greatest threat to humanity of all time is worth you going to all the trouble of growing a couple of veggies or eating less meat where possible.

Sorry for the convenience, I Focus.

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 9:19am

Blowing growing a veggie patch wont change the output of a coal fired power station that feeds industry.
A veggie patch wont change cars to electric or hydrogen in time.its politics, money hence policy and regulation that makes those things happen.

The old green thing was think global act local until some one did the numbers it was feel good and moralistic but not a factor in moving to where we should be history has reaffirmed this as we continue to wipe out species and caused other to become endangered.

For the record I grow trees on my place they are my children, I drive the smallest sized car I need (do you still drive that CC causing 4x4.....sorry just kicked you in the groin.)

My family live pretty humble lives by current Australian standards but it means SFA as its still consumes 100's of times more of the earths resources than a person living in rural China or India.

BTW thanks for considering my feelings I rarely agree with you as you are always wrong unlike me and BB who are always right......... but do enjoy your writings immensely. :-)

I focus's picture
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I focus commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 9:27am

Talking about leading a humble live and consumerism looks like we are going to sell our place so have started looking at places to buy and have been stunned by the amount of shinny stuff in peoples homes.

They obviously spend every second of their spare time shopping at Harvey Norman, JBhifi, Bunnings etc here I am styling in my 20 year old clothing (flares are coming back aren't they).

GuySmiley's picture
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GuySmiley commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 10:05am

Leaders lead (a country, corporation, groups, individuals) and Australia has had a complete lack of real leadership when it comes to climate.

What we have had are smug self serving politicians “managing” the climate debate on behalf of political donors and vested interests.

Sure there has been progress, of sorts, more like window dressing, but the beat goes on and the real effective change that is needed continues to be put off into the future.

This leadership and policy vacuum does render individual efforts almost useless but it does keep me sane and less angry about it all .....

Westofthelake's picture
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Westofthelake commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 2:15pm

Generally, to become a Professor in Climate Science you first have to complete a 4 year Bachelor of Science at University, often followed by a Masters (1 to 2 years) then a Doctorate (4 to 8 years) which will focus intensely on a specific area of expertise, then usually a Post-Doctorate (another 4 to 8 years), again focussing intensely on one element of the science they want to be an expert on.

Then there's this bloke...

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 2:40pm

He should get "IDIOT" tattooed on his forehead so people don't have to wait for him to open his mouth.

GuySmiley's picture
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GuySmiley commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 3:16pm

You have to remember with the composition of the new senate Divided Nation have been effectively sidelined.

While Paulie often talks of “her people” and “the people” the truth of the matter is she and her party are bolted on supporters of the neoliberal agenda of the LNP. That fact makes it all the more tragic that the punters who vote for her think they are registering a “protest against the big two”.... didn’t indo vote for her? Sharp as bowling balls dem voters.

Anyway, with the two nano-dimwitted senators sidelined expect more and more outrageous statements, it’s the only ways they get a headline and any attention as Anning exploited.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 3:42pm

She’s actually completely opposed to the open borders immigration policies of the two majors.

This is the primary policy for many people.

A vote for her is a vote for the end f unfettered immigration. An extremely worthy sentiment.

It’s the numb skulls who vote ALP as a declaration of concern for the environment who are out of their tiny minds. ALP backed Adani , ALP want to destroy Australian environment with mass immigration.

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:16pm

I thought this was worth posting in full

"As if the climate emergency was not already bad enough, today’s revelations that the Australian Defence Force is concerned about the security implications of global warming only underscores the fiddle-while-Rome-burns incompetence of our federal government. This morning the ABC revealed documents showing the military warning of increased “sea-borne migration” due to warming, which could mean 100 million refugees seeking to come to Australia. Meanwhile, serving defence chief Angus Campbell has warned [$] that China might occupy Pacific islands abandoned as seas rise. Today it’s the ADF in the news, but just about every Australian institution is calling for urgent action to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to try to limit warming to 1.5 degrees: the Reserve Bank, ASIC, the courts and the banks who have refused to fund Adani’s coalmine. Everyone, that is, except Australia’s denialist politicians and their media cheerleaders who seem determined to drive the country over a cliff.
Last week David Attenborough told a British parliamentary inquiry it was “extraordinary” that climate-change deniers were in power in Australia, given we are “already facing having to deal with some of the most extreme manifestations of climate change”. As economist Ross Garnaut warned more than a decade ago, Australia’s large agricultural sector and a reliance on trade with developing nations in Asia, which are also put at risk by rising temperatures, makes it one of the most vulnerable countries in the developed world.
To his warning we can now add that of the ADF, which is reportedly worried that “sea level rise, ocean acidification, increase in extreme temperatures and a forecast increase in intensity of bushfires and extreme weather events may directly impact Defence capabilities, personnel and equipment”. The Defence Force also warns that “an increase in illegal foreign fishing or sea-borne migration to Australia because of climate change effects may increase demands for Australian Defence Force patrols in Australia”. Former defence chief Admiral Chris Barrie, now a member of the Global Military Advisory Council on Climate Change, told the ABC that he “once suggested to government we might be talking 100 million people … when we’re only 40 million people – you can get the enormity of this problem. Frankly, it would be beyond our resources.” Similarly, a month ago General Angus Campbell told an invitation-only forum on climate change and national security that “if other states see the opportunity to occupy uninhabited spaces then it could introduce new tension into our region”.
Foreign Affairs Minister Marise Payne did her best to sound as though the government was indeed serious about climate change on RN Breakfast this morning, saying that “we are very focused on our engagement in climate in the region”, and claiming that our $2 billion Pacific infrastructure fund would “stream climate adaptation and resilience”, whatever that means. At home, however, Angus Taylor is in charge of getting Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions down (they’re going up) while also getting electricity prices down (they’re also going up). A sure sign of the government’s policy apathy is its failure to do the homework: RMIT ABC Fact Check shows National Party deputy leader Bridget McKenzie’s recent claim that there were 54,000 people employed in the thermal coal sector did not stack up – they reckon it’s more like 29,000 people.
Meanwhile, the LNP’s post-truth ideologues, including resources (and science) minister Matt Canavan and member for Dawson George Christensen speak in favour of a Queensland party motion calling for a new state agency to reject scientific advice.
The government is not trying when it comes to climate change – in fact, you could mount an argument that it’s trying to make climate change worse. Prime Minister Scott Morrison can hop around on US aircraft carriers all he wants: the grave security risk to Australia is his do-nothing government."

https://www.themonthly.com.au/today/paddy-manning/2019/15/2019/156316830...

GuySmiley's picture
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GuySmiley commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:34pm

How good is Australia?

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:37pm

Laurie , you do realise that this line is referring to China eyeing off our uninhabited North don’t you ?

“Similarly, a month ago General Angus Campbell told an invitation-only forum on climate change and national security that “if other states see the opportunity to occupy uninhabited spaces then it could introduce new tension into our region”.”

Maybe you can choose to dismiss that as completely untrue as it doesn’t gel with your incorrect beliefs regarding China ? You do only seem to want to believe facts when they suit.

Oh wait , I forgot that your “ research “ led you to believe otherwise. Maybe you should inform General Angus Campbell of your findings.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:39pm

“Climate refugees “ is going to be the euphemism employed by the globalists for every wave of nation shopping immigrants for the next decade.

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:41pm

Disagree, on both.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:46pm

It’s your prerogative and entitlement to be incorrect, Laurie.

Don’t expect to be admired for it.

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velocityjohnno commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:48pm

I had a bit of a research on Blowin's Silica play above, I know the country well. Much of the WA coastal plain features sandy types of soil bereft of nutrients. The areas described do feature high quality sands, and are already mined at Eneabba. Because of the lack of nutrients, a highly varied scrub has evolved over them, with great speciation, more than what you would expect in other biomes. The country just south of Eneabba is quite pretty at the Marchargee track, too.
The area between Eneabba and the coast road turnoff is hardly developed at present and quite beautiful in its own way - though you might be pressed to say that on a 40+ degree day traveling the Brand. Some of the very famous WA wildflower country is in this area - again, great diversity of species. My favourite is the Wreath Flower of the Mullewa area, impressive little plant.

Overall it seems like the next successful chapter of the national pastime of "sell them dirt", and I'm sure they will have an enviro dept, but yeah...

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 4:48pm

Arrogance ....... as usual.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 5:01pm

Shame you can’t sue me for being right , huh ?

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 5:11pm

For those that don't know this link below is what the David Attenborough comments would refer too, he was also busted trying to pass off some footage of a polar bear giving birth in the wild that was actually filmed in a German zoo and a few others dodgy misleading scenarios.set ups, i guess to be fair it probably has been happening for as long as docco's have been getting made...old Albany mangles even got busted for a few didn't he?

https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/netflix-is-lying-about-those-...

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 5:13pm

1. China is logistically capable of invading any part of Australia anytime soon.
2. China has created a number of new cities which are largely empty and has no need to relocate significant numbers.
3. China has no interest in war as a means of expanding its power and influence.

In the unlikely event that you are ever right I will be happy to acknowledge it. Getting over your OCD regarding immigration and China would be the first step.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 5:46pm

Cool , I’ll stop mentioning things i know to be extremely relevant and of overarching importance such as immigration and the China threat as soon as you stop mentioning climate change , Trump and all forms of politics.

Deal ?

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 6:34pm

Can't remember the last time I mentioned Trump but as this is a climate change thread yes I will mention climate change. Perhaps you should post your China comments in another thread.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 7:01pm

Your link was referring to China and I’m discussing it.

Unfortunately for you , Laurie, you don’t get to control the discourse once you’ve left the classroom.

BTW - OCD is a genuine illness . Just because it hasn’t registered on the Social Justice Warrior official list of circumstance to allocate inalienable victim hood yet , doesn’t mean it’s all cool to label your enemies with.
I
Someone with genuine concern would realise this. Maybe you’re not as woke as you think ?

PS Lucky I’m using a pseudonym, otherwise I could’ve leveled spiteful, vexatious and entirely unbecoming legal action against you for publicly insinuating that I suffered from a serious mental illness. Lucky for both of us really. Because even considering launching legal action against such a petty issue as rude words on the internet makes me feel like a cowardly, half - man piece of shit.
I don’t think I could’ve looked at myself in the mirror afterwards,

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 6:54pm

Yep OCD is a real disease. Have you considered that you may have it? All discussions lead to the same places.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 7:12pm

Not OCD , Laurie.

I’m just aware of the perilous affect that unsustainable immigration levels are having on our nation. More direct effects than climate change in the short , medium and long terms and over a wider spectrum of issues.

Sydney’s water supplies are already inadequate for the population. There’ll be no need to worry about reaching carbon emissions targets if there’s no water to keep us alive.

And China would just enslave those it didn’t kill , so yeah , it’s a more threatening reality than climate change.

I wonder when the Doomsday Clock will reflect this new reality? Very soon if it wasnt necessary to be as politically partisan as the time they moved it for Trump.

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 8:03pm

Disagree. On all points. The same ones you have raised endlessly and which numerous people have answered, numerous times.

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 8:57pm

Doesn’t matter if you agree or disagree, Laurie.

They’re facts, which means they’re not dependent on your beliefs or opinions.

And the numerous people who have disagreed ? That’s you and another person who flaunted their ignorance. That’s it.

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Monday, 15 Jul 2019 at 9:18pm

No mate, they are your opinions. Not a fact in sight.

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Blowin commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 5:47am

Are you honestly saying that you think it’s a true statement that Sydney’s water supplies are adequate for its growing population ? Don’t worry about the fact that every single expert in Australia would disagree with you.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-28/sydney-to-get-water-restructions-...

And you were responsible for teaching Australia’s children ? OMFG.

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 7:31am

A fact might be " Sydney needs to plan to maintain its water supply for an increasing population".

After an extended drought Sydney now has Stage 1 water restrictions, not exactly a crisis! As for expert opinion, it would be much more likely to agree with my statement than your hysterical linkage to immigration levels. Same old obsessions.

Terminal's picture
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Terminal commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 12:12pm

I suspect that every expert in Australia would turn an eye to the agriculture sector (a couple in particular) before they blamed immigrants lol.

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GuySmiley commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 12:30pm

Sydney’s main drinking water dam, is there talk of increasing the height of the wall and flooding some of the the back valleys in the blue mountains area?

If that were to occur it would be such a shame, the blue mountains is just the most wonderful place, that and the kangaroo valley.

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Laurie McGinness commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 1:01pm

Yeh it would be a spectacularly bad idea Guy. There are many other options, most notably recycling, efficiency and repairing the pipes which currently leak huge volumes, roughly 10% of the total volume and that is on Sydney Water's side of the meters. Many large commercial properties would also be losing significant quantities on site.

I focus's picture
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I focus commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 1:01pm

Perth now depends on decel plants 12 months of the year I would guess most of the other capital cities will eventually to at least if you wanted to you could run them with solar.

truebluebasher's picture
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truebluebasher commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 1:05pm

Libs claim there's no such thing as Climate Change & they can prove it!.
Both Cayman Island's Snowy & Murray river banks are overflowing.

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GuySmiley commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 2:44pm

Melbourne is ordering water from its desal, the biggest in the sth hemisphere if that's something to boast about. At the time it was built I said it wasn't for the present needs but to allow the state to increase migration, sad but that was true.

There was once some fine surfing to be had where they plopped that plant and further afield surfing the Island even mid week has been effected by the influx of attached workers.

Now while Melbourne is using desal water the govt down here is allowing logging in Melbourne's once pristine water catchments, Go figure that, regrowth needs exponentially more water than old growth before threatened endangered species come into the equation. The world is a mad place.

indo-dreaming's picture
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indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 16 Jul 2019 at 4:33pm

True when it was being built big influx of workers to the region including surfers.

But i don't think it makes any difference now, obviously like everywhere its more crowded down this way, but it's more just over the last 25 years or so, so many guys/familys have moved to the area, you take the good with the bad though, more people here, but also much more work, while before was not as many people but not much work.

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indo-dreaming commented Wednesday, 17 Jul 2019 at 8:35pm

Bob Brown is just unbelievable, is he now working for the coal industry?

First he helped ensure the Liberals got in by taking his convoy to North QLD, now he is against a proposal one of the worlds biggest wind farms in NW Tassie?

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/greens-exposed-as-bob-b...

https://reneweconomy.com.au/greens-founder-brown-speaks-out-against-tasm...

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tubeshooter commented Wednesday, 17 Jul 2019 at 10:00pm

haha yeah ID . a quote from the big B... "mariners will see this hairbrush of towers from 50km at sea...." navigational aid thanks ,,"...and elevated landlubbers will see it , like or not , from greater distances on land".... "elevated landlubbers"? ffs

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tubeshooter commented Thursday, 18 Jul 2019 at 9:04pm
Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 22 Jul 2019 at 6:46pm

How good is this !

We get the export dollars and then when they’re trying to flood us with “ climate “ refugees in a few years we can tell them to fuck off guilt free.

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/bangladesh-wants-australia-s-coa...

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truebluebasher commented Monday, 22 Jul 2019 at 7:54pm

(Est. 2008) NCCARF National Climate Change Adaption Research Facility

Oz Uni (Combos) with part Govt Set / Oz Councils. (Currently based on Gold Coast)
tbb thinks maybe Big Bird (Latest tech Buoy) sails under the same banner.

NCCARF ...YouTube channel...(Introduction to Coast Adapt)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy23r7LBpwwFHr-G3vGe1Gg/featured

NCCARF ...Summaries + Policy Briefs
https://www.nccarf.edu.au/synthesis

NCCARF Library (264 Papers)
Search: International / Oz / State / Resource / Topic / Conference Papers
https://www.nccarf.edu.au/adaptation-library

Don't ask tbb as it's very low key on the Goldie! ... Maybe crew can enlighten!

Laurie McGinness's picture
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Laurie McGinness commented Wednesday, 24 Jul 2019 at 4:16pm

from The Monthly's Daily Briefing. The only question is how long they can keep their heads in the sand before they receive their well overdue kick up the arse.

There is an air of pinch-me unreality about Australian politics as parliament’s work is conducted in apparent denial of the existential threat presented by climate change, which even the CEO of one of the world’s largest miners, BHP’s Andrew Mackenzie, acknowledged [$] in a major speech overnight. Backbencher Barnaby Joyce told the House this week that there was “not one thing that this parliament can do to change the weather – not one thing”. In that particularly boneheaded assessment he appears to be at one with the floundering minister for energy and emissions reductions, Angus Taylor, who squirmed his way through question after question from the Opposition yesterday, as he tried to avoid the undeniable fact that Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions are going up as a result of this country’s climate policy vacuum.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison showed his complete disengagement with a classic bit of climate-babble in Question Time yesterday: “We had to turn around a million tonnes in abatement over the course of our efforts,” he claimed, “and that’s what we have done!” A million tonnes or 700 million tonnes – which is the deficit the government claims to have inherited from Labor – it’s all the same to the PM.
Taylor may have misled the House yesterday by saying that he had “no association and have remained at arm’s length at all times from Jam Land”, the company that is under investigation for alleged illegal land-clearing, as Labor has pointed out in renewed questions today. Taylor tried a bit of revision today, saying he had no association with the investigation, and that his interest in Jam Land had been properly disclosed and widely reported. He will brazen it out, more proof that misleading parliament is not what it used to be.
Taylor tried arguing that Australia’s emissions have gone up because we are now the world’s largest exporter of LNG, and even tried to put a figure on it, saying the overseas reductions were equivalent to 26 per cent of our national emissions. But Taylor is trying to play fast and loose with the international emissions accounting rules: if Australia wants to claim credit for the reductions supposedly attributable to burning our gas overseas, it must also take responsibility for the massive emissions from burning our coal overseas. That will soon include emissions from Adani’s giant Carmichael mine, which is going ahead in central Queensland, even though the ABC reports today that the company is a “collapse waiting to happen”.
Country after country is recognising the climate emergency, including Canada, the United Kingdom – where the new PM, Boris Johnson, is not a climate denier – and France, where heroic Swedish school striker Greta Thunberg calls on the National Assembly to “unite behind the science”. In his speech, BHP’s Mackenzie recognised the need for a mobilisation on the scale of World War Two – which is exactly what the Green New Dealers have been calling for – and linked executive pay to emissions reductions, which is the kind of initiative that could really get things moving. The Greens’ Adam Bandt pointed out that BHP is now showing more leadership on climate than the federal government.
Instead of genuine climate action, what have we today? Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton playing the man against shadow attorney-general Mark Dreyfus, rather than explain why the bipartisan recommendations of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence Services over the foreign fighters legislation have been ignored. And the entire parliament banging on about the CFMMEU’s embattled Victorian secretary, John Setka – whose name is now apparent justification for any kind of attack on unions, and will be hurled endlessly at Labor leader Anthony Albanese as his case against expulsion drags on. Even where climate change is directly relevant to the policy up for debate, as with the Future Drought Fund, the government remains in denial. Reality surely will hit home soon.