Happy Australia day !!!!

Blowin's picture
Blowin started the topic in Thursday, 25 Jan 2018 at 10:03am

Sure the long weekend officially starts tomorrow, but patience has never been my strong suit and today is just too damn fine to waste with thoughts of routine So I’ve kicked this thing off early.

Actually started with a bang last night as another earthquake shook me from sleep. It was a stinker of a night . Building up to some monsoonal activity and the hot , still nights are here with a vengeance. Laying with the sheets bunched on the floor and the air from the fan brushing my skin.

Then I was woken by the Big Fella of the mob of greys that gets around the traps. He seemed to think that indoors was the place to be. First time I’ve seen a kangaroo trying to negotiate a fly screen door. Stupid prick.

Third event for the night and it sounds like someone’s after my tinny - the Sea Wok . Throw on some shorts and bolt down the path to investigate straight into an industrial sized spiders web. Still asleep , I actually feel the Big Golden orb running across my chest trying to escape.

The boat was fine . The spider and myself came to an agreement to stay the fuck away from each other from now on. Back to bed.

Woke up bleary to a perfect day. Northerly beats me to the punch . Surfing’s out so it’s coffees at the kiosk then a quick dive to spear some lunch.

Fish in the fridge , the days heating up and I’m planning on cracking my first beer at 14:30.

Feel free to join me.

Time to take stock of the incredible life we’ve got in this amazing country.

You might not like the premise, but I reckon this holiday rules. It’s the celebration of Australia at its peak. Everyone has let go of the old year and made inroads on the next. The craziness and release of the Chrissy / New Years is behind us and the summer has been wrung of every bit of fun available. The caravan parks and coastal towns are still chockers but the last hurrah is upon us. It’s been great and I’ve had a ball.

So raise a glass or an ice cream or a halal salad or whatever the fuck you want in recognition of how good we’ve got it here under Huey’s benevolent gaze.

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 1:16pm

The flag waving thing is relatively recent picked up by a younger generation before that it wasn't held in such high regard, lets face it its a quasy British empire colonial symbol rather than quintessential Horsetralian (note your leader the Queens pronunciation).

Flag waving / hand of heart (vomit) is very American not cynical Australian-isim.

I understand the military honour it as many sacrifices were made under the flag and you have to have some thing to wave around for those parades but beyond that is it / represent the core values of our Australian ethos or is there to much baggage?

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 1:56pm

never saw any flag waving or Aussie day stuff when I was growing up.

total Howard invention, cynical manipulation to head off Pauline Hansons One Nation.

GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 2:11pm

Important contextual issues on Howard and his approach to indigenous issues as prime minister were his fierce opposition to to the Marbo decision and Labor's Natives Titles Act (both in 1993) and the Wik decision (1994). Coupled with this was Howard's intense dislike for the Hawke/Keating legacy and speeches like Keating's Redfern Speech (1993).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1S4F1euzTw

Still well worth a listen after all these years and as relevant as ever highlighting what was once thought possible by an Australian prime minister.

truebluebasher's picture
truebluebasher's picture
truebluebasher commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 5:46pm

29 April 1770 was 1st recorded British landing in Botany Bay Oz by Cook.
Cook notes whole journey no matter how close they sailed the Locals never cared.
Subtle reminder that Cook was just one of many sailing the East Coast .

Cook launches 2 boats ashore where 1 old /1 young Aboriginals poise with spears.
Cook throws trinkets to draw them nearer...They refuse to accept his lame trick.
'With no other resource but to fire'...Cook fires first shot . Old man hits ground.
A stone is thrown back.. Cook's second shot strikes the young natives legs.

British/Captain Cook launched 1st attack upon the Australia people by sea.
With locals out of the frame a forced entry & British Flag could then be hoisted.

Cook's East Coast charts are said to be a Masterpiece. (Take A closer look)
https://www.oldworldauctions.com/catalog/lot/124/712

Two biggest features being Sydney Harbour + Moreton Bay are missing...WTF
Where are all the Creeks + Northern Rivers + The break in Qld Island Chains?
This bloke is #1 go to Cartographer so why this pile of vacuous excrement.

I & others argue break thrus mostly occurred from 1795 >1830. (But is that true?)
Cook was ordered to omit hidden strategic features off Oz East Coast Chart.
Cook's charts are a lie. Navigators/US Sealers relied upon Dutch East Coast Maps.

23 May 1770 Cook Hoists 2nd Flag at Bustard Bay (1770)
22 August 1770 Cook hoists the 3rd & final Flag at Possession Island.

Arriving at Batavia Cook learns of previous Pacific xing by Louie Bouganville.(Shit!)

Cook rewrites journal to Claim Oz 'NSW' whilst on top of Possession Island...WTF
3 shots fired from land & 3 shots fired by Ship (Clear! No inhabitants) Kings land!
Only Joseph Banks was with him and says that's all bullshit...it never happened.

26th Jan 1788 First Fleet...is the 4th British Landing/Flag hoisting

26 Jan 1938 (150 years on) The Day of Mourning
Day of Mourning is longest continuous event held on 26th January.
Known also as 1988 Invasion Day + 1992 Survival Day.

Aborigines lay far greater claim and continued reverence to 26th of January date.
Some aren't gonna like hearing that Aborigines treat Oz day with greater respect!
Perhaps we're meant to live with 26th of Jan' Day of Mourning for our own good.

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 7:18pm

.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 7:59pm

I really really don't get the love for Paul Keating around here, never been that into politics, but i just cant stand the guy just a few seconds of that video was enough, I'm not sure if it was his doing or Bobs (i really like him as a person) or just the cycle but that period when Keating was in power were dark days, Australia was a mess unemployment was super high, property was worth nothing, interest rates super high, I'm just really lucky i didn't care to much and just wanted to go surfing, cause even if i wanted a job when i finished school it was highly unlikely id get one.

On the flip side i don't get the hate for Howard now with hindsight, yeah i hated him at the time and i never voted for him and his face still annoys me, but in hindsight his era was a much better era, maybe it was luck or cycles i don't know, all i know is things got much better and he was in power for almost 13 years (second longest serving prime minister) so we had stability.

Not like now, it's been about 12 years since Howard got defeated and we are onto our sixth prime minister (highly likely be 7 by the end of the year)

I mean yeah sure on paper i don't like the idea of selling off public assets etc or high immigration, but i guess it worked.

I also like the patriotic side of Howard, nothing at all wrong with being patriotic, being patriotic is about being proud of you country and culture.

We should all be be proud of our uniqueness and being Australian, and no it not about focussing on negatives that have happened, being patriotic is about focussing on the positives of your country not negatives.

GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 8:50pm

@Indo, you must have so many fukn splinters up your arse you're such a fence sitter.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Monday, 21 Jan 2019 at 10:18pm

@Guy I think its hard for you to understand because you pick a party Labour and then everything they say and do you repeat including hating on the opposition, even if the opposition was right or had a good idea you wouldn't admit it.

Personally id rather be called a fence sitter and form my own opinion on things, agree with a party on this, disagree with a party on this, maybe not like the politician as a person but like what they do, or like the politician as a person but not agree with their politics.

I can also admit that my views can change over time especially with the luxury of hindsight, for instance i also voted for Kevin Rudd but now can admit that was a big mistake.

Optimist's picture
Optimist's picture
Optimist commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 5:44am

Bill Shortens talking about bringing in new taxes including a retirement tax. That's because an idiot can only make money by putting his hands in other peoples pockets.
You don't have to like Scott Morrison but at least we wont be broke if he gets in. We will also not have a real estate crash and higher interest rates. If you vote Greens you will need a magic money tree. That's where the Greens pay for things, in the fairy forest where the magic money tree grows. A broke Australia goes nowhere and does nothing but pay interest to other countries. Learn from the past or are we all turning into "Dory".

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 7:20am

I hope they tax the motherfucking shit out of these lazy baby boomers.
cunts are killing this country.

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 7:51am

If there’s one thing you can’t really accuse the baby boomers of it’s being lazy.

I don’t know about you , but my parents and the parents of everyone I know were stereotypical workers. No sickies , no days off , at the coalface every day. Whilst the nation and our generation enjoyed the fruits of their labours , it became obvious that they weren’t appreciated and were often exploited for their work ethic.

They dedicated their lives to toil and nation building, then the neo liberal experiment went about privatising , dismantling or selling every decent thing they’d created for our country.

The union movement died with the vigor of the baby boomers.

Irukandji kiss's picture
Irukandji kiss's picture
Irukandji kiss commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 8:19am

Oblivious to their luck??
Housed and protected by a welfare state.
Full employment.
Most had access to free tertiary education.
Joined the real estate elevator at the basement and amassed enormous riches through it. In thirty years the worst house on the worst street in the worst suburb appreciated more than a person could possibly save.
Most were in middle-age consolidation so they could exploit neoliberalism when it was ushered in.
There's no better example of their ignorance than the annual OS holiday spending the amassed wealth as if every coming generation will also have the privilege.

GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 8:35am

@Indo, please continue I really do like reading your posts here prefaced by statements like: I'm not really interested but ... ; I don't really know but ... ; I've never voted for { } but ...; I don't really like { } but ... . The best was ... I've never spoken to a muslim woman wearing a full burqa and niqab before ... and ... but.

@Blowin, 100% agree, the boomers and their parents worked hard.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 8:44am

To be fair i do think it was that easy for them as that.

I know both my parents worked really hard, moved to an area they didn't like just because there was lots of work (latrobe valley was booming with the SEC)

Worked their way from very low paid positions upwards.

Lived in a shitty little flat to start off with, all very basic, second hard cars etc

Holidays were rare and not overseas and it was a big treat to eat out be it takeaway or at the pub for a counter meal.

No to mention my old man had to go to Vietnam before i was born.

Big problem now is many younger people don't want to sacrifice things, they want to live somewhere cool, everything has to be new, modern and big including houses and cars and then that house has to be filled with all new mod cons, even as a kid i remember if they wanted something it was all about lay-by and paying it off before you got it.

Then on top of that many still want a lifestyle of eating out every week and holidays overseas etc

And don't know about others, but there was no living with parents to save they were kicked out when they were 18

CMC's picture
CMC's picture
CMC commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 9:19am

Interesting comments from FR and IK obviously feeling aggrieved about how easy it was for baby boomers.
I am one (boomer) albeit at the tail end of the boomers I turn 62 this year and still surf short boards!!
I'm the son of european immigrants who came here with nothing and had to do shit work pretty much all their lives to get ahead
What they did was instill a strong work ethic in me and taught me to save and sacrifice some of the fun things so that I could build myself a secure future.
So school holidays were not overseas but camping by the beach with other friends and family and the fun was had in the beach environment (this led me to surf).
Left home at 19, I bought a shitbox house in my mid twenties and worked my arse off to renovate it (mostly working on weekends/nights whilst living in it) and get it paid off. From there onwards with continuing to work hard, get a better house and eventually own it.
I'm no multi millionaire with heaps of properties but I own my home and am now able to enjoy the benefits of the effort I made in the past (40 years, its a slow burn)
As far as being taxed to shit as FR would like me to be, I've paid my fair share along the way and I also had a business for 14 years where I employed and looked after younger crew and again paid plenty of tax all with my house mortgaged to sustain the business (nuts on the line).
Yes as a boomer I have had opportunities that today's world doesn't have as easily, but if you were in my shoes or the same opportunities were open to you, wouldn't you do the same?? So before you go bagging us perhaps talk to a few who have done the hard yards.

Ralph's picture
Ralph's picture
Ralph commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 9:19am

Most people who own their homes now worked hard and made sacrifices along the way to get to where they are. They also paid their taxes on the way thru and that helped pay for the infrastructure that everyone uses now.

Irukandji kiss's picture
Irukandji kiss's picture
Irukandji kiss commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 10:05am

Spare me Ralph, we're all paying taxes. Let's just acknowledge that everyone who wants to get ahead is working hard and that grit isn't exclusive to just one generation. But when that generation bought homes at 3-4 times the annual wage, yet homes in the same suburbs are now worth 13-14 times the annual wage then you'd agree there's some disparity, yes?

sypkan's picture
sypkan's picture
sypkan commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 10:35am

Good comments above, including freeride. Spot on description of our parents generation indod.

My parents never ever had a brand new car until just a few years ago....then they went and died.

Most of that generation worked fucking hard and did provide the infrastructure for todays privelaged lives.

However a heap of them made a fortune out of this...

"...They dedicated their lives to toil and nation building, then the neo liberal experiment went about privatising , dismantling or selling every decent thing they’d created for our country.

The union movement died with the vigor of the baby boomers.

Especially the "privatising , dismantling or selling" part. Even those that think they didn't, did, through inflated prices for host of reasons as part of the above process.

But if you didn't get in on the property ladder, or fell off due to life, you're fucked.

Baby boomers did work fucking hard, but to a certain extent they sold out on our kids, squeezing more than they should have out of the post war boom lemon.

Too much idealism stymied the growing need for addressing sustainability, economic and environmental.

If they want to maintain their opulence through retirement then... " tax the motherfucking shit out of these lazy baby boomers."

chook's picture
chook's picture
chook commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 11:11am

geez, spare me the "virtue of hard work, pay your taxes" bullshit. the game is rigged, it's corrupt, it's a con. you're just working hard and paying taxes so the rich don't have to. your hard work meant a gift of millions to rupert murdoch and that great barrier reef stooge company.

and as for the blame the other generation crap... you've made it adulthood without hearing of the old divide-and-conquer strategy?

spookypt's picture
spookypt's picture
spookypt commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 11:02am

I remember hearing Peter Beattie QLD State Labour Premier on the radio while driving through Wharf Street in Brisbane saying that the privatisation of electricity would not increase power costs but decrease them. Yep! not. And dont even start me on the water Desal plant of Tugun. It'll never rain again! (though a sprinkling this week would be nice.) If you think people who work hard and have made good (perception) have had it easy and should be taxed through the ass....Well here's a news flash. We already are! The greatest issue facing current Australians is for anyone under 60 is none have ever faced true adversity. GFC aint nothing on WW1 WW2 Vietnam yadda yadda. God help those who are afraid to use hessian bags for shoes!

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 11:59am

Great comment , Chook.

I was going to write something along those lines in my initial post but had somewhere to be so I canned it.

But your point is exactly what I learnt from my parent’s efforts. Blind obsequiousness to authority only gets you more shit on your shit sandwich. The system is a con. The ideology behind a government overseeing our interests is great , but the reality is a pisstake. Never , ever trust them.

I believe that those born ‘Australian 55 - ‘75 had perhaps the best run in the modern world.

Personally (72) I took the piss with basically everything. Including a ( all too brief ) stint on the dole. I saw my parents work their slots off , listened to mum’s stories of bawling her eyes out with fear when they got their first mortgage then watch as the country they’d studiously worked their arses off to create got sold out from under them .

Now despite paying Aussie taxes their whole lives , well before middle class welfare , they’re on the year long waiting list for surgery behind the grandmother of Chinese immigrants who came here as students a few years ago.

And their entire pool of social security money has now been rolled over into general revenue so they’re made to feel like they’re taking the piss when drawing a pension.

Crew my age were likely to buy in before housing went nuts if they were workers and they also strolled into a once in a century mining boom . We had a good run of relatively uncrowded waves , the ability to travel , no wars and we got to enjoy the world before social media rendered every mistake permanent and reduced every moment to a fucking hashtag.

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 12:05pm

true story

blindboy's picture
blindboy's picture
blindboy commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 12:24pm

Housing has always been about taking your chances when they came up. There was a time in the 70s when the rate of inflation was higher than the mortgage rate so banks were really giving money away. People who bought in that brief window saw there mortgage massively reduced in real terms by inflation. Missed the chance myself. After that in Sydney it has always been about reading the market. In my observation it rises rapidly, stalls maybe drops a bit and plateaus or rises more slowly. The trick has always been to buy before the sudden increase and trade up down the line. To get into the Sydney market I bought in the Blue Mintsins just before a boom. Lived there for two years. Near zero surf time. You could probably still do that if you are committed enough.
Beach prices though, are now well beyond most people. I sit in the water these days and hear people chatting about their investment properties, share prices, start ups etc. Used to be tradies swapping stories from their building sites!

GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 2:30pm

@Blowin, again find myself agreeing with what you have to say. My only caveat is I haven't lost all faith in the political system to deliver good outcomes, so if Labor doesn't start to incrementally move to reverse the neo-liberalism stain over the next 3+ years of government I'm with you and the revolution.

spookypt's picture
spookypt's picture
spookypt commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 2:49pm

Dont forget there was a times in the 80's when interest rates were 18%. And if we want to add the politico element under a labour government in a recession we had to have apparently. We're all phucken spoilt and we all winge (including me) cause we can under the faceless thing that is social media. Its a non winnable argument on either side of whatever barrow you choose to push. Just be thankful, if you can...that the sun still comes up tomorrow. Because if it doesnt..then we are all truly phucked!

factotum's picture
factotum's picture
factotum commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 6:24pm

Haha! Guy Smiley! Blowie's revolution?! What the fuck is that?!

Does it involve mandatory sailing round Straya on the Endeavour?

http://www.comedycentral.com.au/the-mike-nolan-show/videos/the-mike-nola...

Hahahahahappy Straya day!!!!

(gotta have 4 exclamation marks, cunt)

FFS.

Now, Chook's revolution is the real go!

Viva La Chook.

factotum's picture
factotum's picture
factotum commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 3:15pm

Spookypt, too much sun is gonna be the problem!

spookypt's picture
spookypt's picture
spookypt commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:02pm

If the weather forecasting pro's can only really "predict with certainty" what's gonna happen to our weather over the course of the next 5 days (Official quote from head forecastor at the BOM last Friday ABC Radio - Pissed my pants).... I'm hardly packing my bags and jumping with faith on the in 20 yrs time global warming propaganda train.
(** Don't get me started on pill testing! FFS)

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:17pm

spookypt, the difference is that it's really fkn hard to predict fine details, but relatively easy to predict loose trends over a longer period.
E.g. you'd have buckley's chance of accurately forecasting the surf at your local at 7am on Wednesday three weeks from now, but you'd be a pretty safe bet to say you'll get a decent wave on the east coast some time in June.

He who hesitates is lost

spookypt's picture
spookypt's picture
spookypt commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:26pm

No not really, as the Sunny Coast is a magnet for the devil winds Im pretty much guaranteed it'll be shit in 3 days and 3 weeks. But I digress.
Based on the analogy above you would agree if we look at NASA's global temperature data from February 2016 to February 2018, that "global average temperatures dropped by 0.56 degrees Celsius." The biggest two-year drop in the past century.

Better pull our jumpers out... Im currently trademarking "Global Cooling". The next global scare tactic is upon us. Im gonna make a motser!

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:41pm

fucking hell.
triple tax baby booming climate change denying cunts.

it's getting hotter and drier dipshit.

Sorry Spookypt , you're probably a good bloke.....this drought and heat wave is getting me hot under the collar. Pity the poor cunts out west trying to make a living in it.

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:44pm

My mistake - the Sunny Coast is a little way outside of my usual hunting grounds! In any case, by accurate, I meant getting all the little details right (exact wind direction & speed, swell direction, size and period, etc). So sure, it might be shite, but exactly how shite?

So if any told me they knew with any precision what the weather will be like in a given location in the coming years, I'd be very sceptical. But if they said there's a good chance of seeing more severe weather events generally along the eastern seaboard because of certain long-term trends, that's a little easier to believe.

And could you post a link to that NASA data? I'm curious to see it, but don't really have time to find it myself while I'm at work. Averages on their own aren't really all that useful.

He who hesitates is lost

Craig's picture
Craig's picture
Craig commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:46pm

Biggest 2 year drop in the past century... yeah nah..

I focus's picture
I focus's picture
I focus commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 4:56pm

As a tail end Baby Boomer...................i'll be happy on Australia Day Blowin hope you have a great day

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 5:08pm

Craig, can you explain what the "Temperature Anomaly" is in that graph? Difference to a long-term mean?

He who hesitates is lost

Craig's picture
Craig's picture
Craig commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 5:20pm

Yep, difference from the long-term climatological mean 1951-1980 "The period of 1951-1980 was chosen largely because the U.S. National Weather Service uses a three-decade period to define “normal” or average temperature. The GISS temperature analysis effort began around 1980, so the most recent 30 years was 1951-1980. It is also a period when many of today’s adults grew up, so it is a common reference that many people can remember."

Pops's picture
Pops's picture
Pops commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 5:29pm

Thanks.
It would be really interesting to see a comparison to a much longer, pre-industrial period. Say 500 years circa 1200AD or something like that. You'd suspect the anomaly would be somewhat larger... Doubt there would be accurate enough data available (how accurate a gauge do ice cores give?)

He who hesitates is lost

Craig's picture
Craig's picture
Craig commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 5:31pm

Yeah for sure and they do use the ice-core samples to get a real good proxy of the past climate for the last 800,000 years!

http://www.antarcticglaciers.org/glaciers-and-climate/ice-cores/ice-core-basics/

spookypt's picture
spookypt's picture
spookypt commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 6:12pm

Will post nasa data Tomoz for those willing to accept an opposing view. And yes I’m a cunt. Non surprisingly like most social media platforms having an opinion that differs to others makes me one automatically. The reality is we as humans will wipe each other out due to intolerance and no respect well before the earth burns drowns or simply remains as a status quo. That’s whats fucked about it all.

factotum's picture
factotum's picture
factotum commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 6:19pm

QUEENSLANDER!

FFS.

Beam me up.

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 6:58pm

Put the violins away Spook.

It's got nothing to do with your opinion mate.

GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 9:36pm

And in COALmo's electorate the Commonwealth government is spending $50 million to erect a new memorial to James Cook leaving no stone unturned in the right's view on history.

factotum's picture
factotum's picture
factotum commented Tuesday, 22 Jan 2019 at 11:31pm

Hahahahappy Straya day!!!!

(gotta have 4 exclamation marks, cunt)

Kellya's picture
Kellya's picture
Kellya commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 12:19am

The foreign power bit doesn’t make sense.

factotum's picture
factotum's picture
factotum commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 1:22am

Have a think about it.

Kellya's picture
Kellya's picture
Kellya commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 1:26am

Makes sense from an Aboriginal perspective. The land mass wasn’t known as Australia until the ‘foreign invaders’ did their thing.

Optimist's picture
Optimist's picture
Optimist commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 3:10am

Australia day is for everyone and should be celebrated. There were good and bad on both sides and the world got a bit smaller for our indigenous brothers that day, but due to a shrinking world someone was coming one day and some cultures are far less kind than the Brits. Negative words just cause trouble and the event was hundreds of years ago and all grudges should be long forgotten as everyone moves forward. You can read Cooks journals here http://southseas.nla.gov.au/journals/cook/17700126.html if your interested...quite a good read with daily accounts from the 26th.

GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley's picture
GuySmiley commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 6:23am

great post facto, it makes no sense but yet we cling to it.

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 7:38am

Emancipation day.

It only doesn’t make sense if Australians are completely denied celebrating their creation of a new life beyond the confines of their oppressed past. I get the feeling that we are never meant to rejoice in this fact and that some will only allow recent migrants to celebrate their commencement of a new future . But they’re as guilty of dispossing First Nations people’s as any convict.

Pure unjustified, self hatred.

Only a very , very minor percentage of convicts/ settlers were ever violent towards First Nations.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Wednesday, 23 Jan 2019 at 8:07am

Blowin, do you appreciate why most Indigenous Australians might be very proud Australians but wouldn't want to celebrate Australia Day?