China blamed for 'massive' cyber attack on Bureau of Meteorology computer

thermalben's picture
thermalben started the topic in Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 3:13pm

"China is being blamed for a major cyber attack on the computers at the Bureau of Meteorology".

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-02/china-blamed-for-cyber-attack-on-b...

thermalben's picture
thermalben's picture
thermalben commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 3:14pm

"There is no clear picture yet how much the breach will cost to fix or how long it will take but the critical nature of the bureau's services means its systems cannot be switched off for repair. In the words of one source: "It could take years and cost hundreds of millions of dollars to fix.""

Yikes. 

maddogmorley's picture
maddogmorley's picture
maddogmorley commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 3:26pm

Do we know if there was any damage done as a result? That article justs talks about plugging a hole...
ie any outages, BOM data stolen, member details/password comprimised etc

Blowin's picture
Blowin's picture
Blowin commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 5:30pm

Can't see what the fuss is about regarding selling our communications , energy, ports , agricultural and financial market infrastructure to China is all about....

dandandan's picture
dandandan's picture
dandandan commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 6:38pm

This just in from my house mate:

Why would China give a crap about the BOM? What else in Australia would require use of enormous and powerful computers that can not be turned off? Does the Australian government run their surveillance computers from the same facilities as the BOM?

In short, the government operates their surveillance programs from the same facilities that they do BOM. Both require enormous computing capability and the infrastructure to deal with that (skills, cooling, can't be turned offetc) and the cyber attack from China was not directed at the BOM but at these surveilance programs.

thermalben's picture
thermalben's picture
thermalben commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 6:44pm

Perhaps the Chinese were after a live feed of the Cape Sorell wave buoy.

southey's picture
southey's picture
southey commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 8:42pm

Dan .
I've worked there . Not sure what your talking about .
Unless your talking about a remote disaster recovery server being used as a portal .
Which could be feasible to be located at one of ASIO's many buildings . Physically speaking , the web and
Data firewalls are the only barrier . I seriously doubt that someone would have gained access to internal unprotected consoles . We are not alone , when it comes to the private companies that operate these facilities . I'm reasonably certain that it's the same as either the U.S. , the U .K. or both use .

" SA's Reserve Capacity "

caml's picture
caml's picture
caml commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 8:43pm

Really !

tonybarber's picture
tonybarber's picture
tonybarber commented Wednesday, 2 Dec 2015 at 10:27pm

It is highly possible that BOM systems are housed in the same data centre as many other 'secure' government systems. Tried an IP address and bingo hit BOM
Given the dispersed access to BOM systems, I don't think that security is the key design point for these.
They could be waiting THAT east swell ??