On This Day: Kelly Slater wins the Pipe Masters on the Deep Six

Stu Nettle
The Rearview Mirror

Ten years ago, on the 12th December 2008, Kelly Slater won his sixth Pipe Masters and was awarded his ninth world title. Truth be told Slater had the title sewn up two months previously at Mundaka, meaning the final two contests had no bearing on the title. If Dirk Ziff was in charge of pro surfing in 2008 he'd have had conniptions.

In terms of Slater's dominance, 2008 was on par with 1996. In 2008 he won six out of eleven events (but only competed in ten as he skipped Brazil), while in 1996 he won seven from fourteen events, so you can argue the toss: percentage of wins, or number of wins, but whichever way you dice it, in 2008 Slater had the tour wrapped around his finger.

Now, the reason I'm dropping all these stats is not to impress but to hint at something about Slater's psyche: during times of dominance he's sought out new ideas to keep things fresh. Whether this applies to what happened next is up for conjecture.

About the time the tour was travelling from Brazil to Hawaii, Slater jumped a plane to Micronesia and scored a large swell at P'Pass. In triple-overhead waves he rode a 5'3" version of a design he'd been toying with: a squat double-ender dubbed the Deep Six. The Deep Six was a variation on the similarly shaped Wizard Sleeve, except designed for bigger, hollower waves.

At a time when the average shortboard was 5'10 to 6'0" and a step up 6'4" to 6'6", the Deep Six was designed to be ridden a full six inches under the standard board length. An ugly duckling, the Deep Six was born from the marriage of a Channel Islands 7'0" K-Step and a 6'0" K-Board, with the wide point pushed forward, the thickness beefed up, and the rocker flattened through the middle but flipped at the nose.

"It was," Slater told Marcus Sanders at Surfline about his Frankenstein design, "a shot in the dark - I was guessing as I went along."

Back in Hawaii, Slater unveiled a 5'11" version of the design at the Pipeline Masters. He didn't surf during the first day of competition as the trialists and lower seeds, all riding seven foot spears, fought it out in 10'-12' Pipe. The next day was 4'-6' feet and Slater gave the Deep Six a succesful baptism winning his Round 3 heat against Ezra Sitt 17.77 to 7.90.

The third day of the competition was also finals day and Slater got on an old style roll: 19.40, 18.63, 19.00.

The last score, 19 points, came in a semi-final against Timmy Reyes and was courtesy of a classic Slater escape trick. Comboed with five minutes to go he scored a 9 for a left, which left Reyes holding priority as the clock counted down. On the paddle back out Slater paddled into an improbable right, racing it across the reef to Backdoor getting the full quota from the judges - a perfect 10. See those two waves in the video below.


Slater then took down Chris Ward in the final to collect his sixth Pipe Masters trophy. Meanwhile, the Deep Six/Wizard Sleeve, becames the design(s) everyone was talking about.

"Not less volume," said Al Merrick of the design, "but reconfiguring the volume so that you can still get into the wave but it's short enough that it's not restricting you, so you can go different places on the wave."

"I'm sure that's the next phase of surfing."

Kelly agreed. "Last year was a radical change for my boards and surprising to a lot of people. I am sure some of those changes are here to stay and [surfers] will be on my equipment."

As has happened before, with the shortboard revolution, with rockers, with concaves, when the design pendulum swings it often swings too far. But surfers and shapers don't know that till the design fails.

Slater turned up to the Quiksilver Pro 2009 and rode a 5'4" but was beaten by wildcard Julian Wilson in Round 3. At Bells he rode the same design and went down in Round 2 to Owen Wright. At Tahiti he also went down in Round 2, this time to Aritz Aranburu.

Snapper 2009, starting the year on radically different equipment (WSL/Kirstin)

After dominating in 2008, Slater was placed 25th after three events. He went on to place 6th that year, winning just one contest - Brazil ironically, as it was the contest he usually skipped.

Meanwhile, Slater and Merrick's prediction was, at least partly, coming true; board lengths were reducing both on the pro tour and amongst the punters. Not to Slater's diminutive length, but surfers and shapers were "reconfiguring the volume", as Merrick put it. But it didn't last, not on the pro tour.

By 2012, a survey in Surfer magazine showed that most Top 32 pros were riding boards within an inch of their pre-2008 lengths. There was the odd hold out, such as Stu Kennedy who in 2016 rode a 5'7" Tomo Sci-Phi at Snapper vanquishing Slater who at that point was experimenting with yet another design - a Greg Webber-shaped banana board.

At the Margaret River Pro 2017, John John Florence laid down the blueprint for modern rail surfing, silencing, at least for now, the minimalism championed by Slater over the previous decade.

Comments

thermalben's picture
thermalben's picture
thermalben commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 4:12pm

I still remember watching that final. Epic stuff.

freeride76's picture
freeride76's picture
freeride76 commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 5:23pm

"At Bells he rode the same design and went down in Round 2 to Owen Wright."

Hate to rain on your theory Stu, but at Bells against Owen he rode a standard pointy nose shorty, I think a 5'8" or 5'9" whatever the Kelly model was called back then.

indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming's picture
indo-dreaming commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 6:22pm

Where are al the cool Kelly haters today?

Hope he finds his mojo for pipe.

I think i have a crush on Debra Soh.

jaunkemps's picture
jaunkemps's picture
jaunkemps commented Thursday, 13 Dec 2018 at 5:41pm

Yeh where they now, pussies........Giddyup

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 8:17pm

Did this board lead up to the Hypto Krypto?

bill-poster's picture
bill-poster's picture
bill-poster commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 9:08pm

Makes his 5'3" Cymatic seem less out of the box thinking and more of the same old same old.

dandandan's picture
dandandan's picture
dandandan commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 10:19pm

Who cares about the surfboard, did anyone see that flip phone?

PCS PeterPan's picture
PCS PeterPan's picture
PCS PeterPan commented Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018 at 10:26pm

Who ? , , ,Oh . . that guy who used to win everything and when he stopped winning couldn't let go .
And then when other big pro surfing events unfolded like Taj , Parko announcing their retirements , That guy took over the "twitter-sphere"
talking about his broken toe .
Oh . that old guy .
Gee , I did'nt realise they gave out 10's for a 3 second , 5 foot backdoor
tube , or 9's for a 2 second backhand pit finished off with a really wonky cutback .
Sorry Indo , I'm just tired !
Don't get me wrong , I just hope he retires gracefully.

Lanky Dean's picture
Lanky Dean's picture
Lanky Dean commented Thursday, 13 Dec 2018 at 12:27am

He went too wild and short for most.
The board AM designed for pipe with the fuller nose at 5 11 it was a revolution though.

velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno's picture
velocityjohnno commented Thursday, 13 Dec 2018 at 1:39pm

It's interesting the late 1970's singles went short, widepoint was forward, low rocker, lots of beef in the nose. We have a couple like this. Of course the twinny was already set up this way, and soon the thruster would change an era.

factotum's picture
factotum's picture
factotum commented Thursday, 13 Dec 2018 at 7:59pm

Fark, short! Check out what Bunker Spreckels was riding at Pipe waaaay back when.

dangerouskook2000's picture
dangerouskook2000's picture
dangerouskook2000 commented Friday, 14 Dec 2018 at 7:39pm

You're expanding my vocabulary Stu. Had to google conniptions. Thanks for that.
(no sarcasm)

FunkyCole's picture
FunkyCole's picture
FunkyCole commented Saturday, 15 Dec 2018 at 11:59am

Can someone explain the author's comment that JJF silenced Slater's 'minimalislm' at Margs??? His ghost model was way shorter than other competitors in that event, it has a forward wide point, it has volume pushed forward, and a pulled in tail... That board is the refined evolution of Slater's Deep Six prototype, if anything JJF's performance validates Slater's theory.

Lanky Dean's picture
Lanky Dean's picture
Lanky Dean commented Saturday, 15 Dec 2018 at 3:01pm

I feel they were pretty similar in plan shape.
The ghost was 5 or so inches longer. apart from that I think they are pretty close. (Excluding rocker temp)
I have a JJF board pizzel gave me a little while ago, think his brother rode it first . It had a crazy amount of volume near the nose. ( for ct pro's.) Had an incredible amount of tail rocker also. Paddled great , worked great also. (In Hawaii).
Think pizzel needs to pick up a few ct riders though to validate the boards.whilst his star is absent.

eel's picture
eel's picture
eel commented Sunday, 16 Dec 2018 at 7:32pm

Agreed. That comment in the article makes no sense.

Slater is 5'9 and was riding a 5'11 deep six at Pipe. Shorter than his competitors boards (widepoint forward nose chopped off to make it shorter and pulled in tail).

JJF is 6'1 and was riding a 6'2 or 6'3 ghost at big Margs. Relatively shorter than most others boards in the event. Not as extreme as the deep 6 but widepoint / volume forward and pulled in tail.

Similar theories in terms of length and volume forward

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Saturday, 15 Dec 2018 at 12:31pm

Similar thinking, in a way, as the Ghost is a step up with the front few inches removed, however it makes no concession to minimalism, in fact volume had been added compared to previous boards JJF had been riding.

FunkyCole's picture
FunkyCole's picture
FunkyCole commented Sunday, 16 Dec 2018 at 3:25pm

True of JJF adding volume, but according to Pyzel that was more to do with his reluctance to adapt to being a bigger kid than he was a few years back. There's a SURFER article discussing the volume change and Pyzel says "He's now riding equipment that is more suited for his size".

Slater took it to the extreme with that 5'3 in terms of length, but the minimalism is not in terms of volume - as stated in the article the shapers were "reconfiguring the volume"... check out the wizard sleeve on the CI website, "volume of your standard short board hidden in a board that is 6-8 inches shorter". Interesting though that for JJF, the minimalism in length for the Ghost is only applied in bigger surf - he's still riding a 6'0 Ghost in smaller waves like Brazil or Trestles. Maybe Slater's misstep was trying to translate the 'less is better' theory to small waves, like there's a diminishing return on the design theory as power/size scales down?

Lanky Dean's picture
Lanky Dean's picture
Lanky Dean commented Sunday, 16 Dec 2018 at 4:31pm

Planning is significantly reduced on boards under 6'0 (for a surfer of say 6'0 to 5 ' 10" .)
No matter how much volume is left in the board. It just won't plane efficiently at say 5 ' 3 " for the average surfer.( turns great paddles like S H I T no matter how much volume you put in it.)

Same theory applies to boats.
Long read latter...