Information about users of Surfing Reef forums

stunet's picture
stunet started the topic in Monday, 23 May 2011 at 10:46pm

As has been suggested in the thread titled James Kimo Walker it would be a good idea if users of the Surfing Reef Design part of the forum stated their credentials, their history, and past and present affiliations. This is by no means compulsory, people can still post anonymously, but for those who'd like to have their position known to others please do so in this thread. You can use it to refer back to when new people begin posting.

I may as well begin:

Stuart Nettle. I'm the editor of Swellnet and also an admin of these forums. My position would best be described as 'sceptical pragmatist'. While I'm not directly involved in the design or construction of Artificial Reefs I've written three articles on them, attended the 7th International Artificial Reef Symposium, and try to keep abreast of all developments.

Despite my scepticism I think that AR's are an inevitability. You cannot kill an idea and the idea has already begun to inspire people designing and creating AR's. That cannot be stopped. If I hope to play any part it is to ensure that all environmental effects are rigidly studied and where they are in doubt always erring on the side of caution.

stunet's picture
stunet's picture
stunet commented Monday, 23 May 2011 at 10:55pm

One more point for new users of this forum: There are a few bugs in the forum which we are still trying to sort out. Please bear with us while we fix them.

If you have any serious problems or need help with something email me at: [email protected]

bob_s's picture
bob_s's picture
bob_s commented Monday, 23 May 2011 at 11:22pm

Thats a good point about people identifying themselves. Saying that I think there is no place for elitism in presenting good information. Who is giving information is not as important as the information and how well it can be understood and placed into proper perspective by anyone who takes the time to read , ask questions and understand.

I have always believed that establishing a equal level level of knowledge and understanding is very important for progress.

Your position of being a sceptical pragmatist is a good one as its a way to ensure that anything that sounds too good to be true gets the reality check.

AR's I found have always and always will be a tool for checking coastal erosion.

After being besotted with the idea of perfect waves by ar's I have learnt that it takes true pragmatic skeptism to find robust and cost beneficial solutions.

Very large reefs do protect coasts. Their cost seems to the problem?

bob_s

andrew-pitt's picture
andrew-pitt's picture
andrew-pitt commented Tuesday, 24 May 2011 at 3:58am

Andrew Pitt, graduated with a degree in Landscape Architecture from the Uni NSW in 1991, my Honours Thesis was - Surfing Reefs and the development of submerged coastal landscapes, also served as President UNSW Surfriders Club.
I went on to postgraduate research supervised by Professor Short at Uni of Sydney, looked at - Surfing Reefs: the role of bathymetry, had two stabs as a Master Candidate, though withdrew for financial & family reasons (wife + two kids needed a roof).
I was event founder and director of the 1st International Surfing Reef Symposium 1997 and the 7th Symposium in 2010, see www.surfingramps.com.au/surfingsymposium
My approach to development is - Design With Nature - study natural systems and try to duplicate them. I now run a coastal design consultancy, see www.surfingramps.com.au
I am on the Maroubra Surfers Association Committee and the Bate Bay (Cronulla) Sand Placement Committee. My brother Mick lives in Ulladulla and my other brother Ian runs www.renniks.com (surf books).

i-u-brawn's picture
i-u-brawn's picture
i-u-brawn commented Thursday, 26 May 2011 at 3:13am

^^^???

The censorship nazi strikes again!

go back to china you communist pig?

bigwayne's picture
bigwayne's picture
bigwayne commented Friday, 27 May 2011 at 9:08pm

excuse the boorishness of those uneducated enough to not respect the ground rules big mr nettle , even oneself can see what your trying to achieve and all due respect .

choppyseas's picture
choppyseas's picture
choppyseas commented Monday, 14 Nov 2011 at 5:33pm

hey Im 21 yrs old, I have high school diploma, I dislike educational establishments. so I learn from life and people like you! No affiliates. So history.. I have been asking questions since I was young. A particular vivid memory of when I was young, waiting for the bus to school in december, Its offshore and the waist high swell is moving quickly and its pitching and peeling bending and growing in a color of murky green brown sea, im watching freezing and thinking why doesnt this happen in the summer? Recently I graduated and decided that surfing waves was something that I would do forever. I read waves & beaches and started to understand waves and bathymetry. Im gunna say that I have spent 500 hours reading and observing the nature of a surfing wave, on second thought it could easily be lots more. I know I can teach and learn here. That is if I can happen by here on a regular basis. I am here because I want to create a surf spot.

peter-gilmore's picture
peter-gilmore's picture
peter-gilmore commented Thursday, 2 Feb 2012 at 5:09am

MY name is Peter Gilmore, I am a first time contributor to this forum. age is 51 nearly 52. I live in Mandurah, Western Australia and have noticed sand being pumped across the estuary entrance for the last god knows how many years. The side too which the sand is pumped would require very little in the way of repositioning the sand out fall to help the already existant sand banks, that just don't quite do it since the estuary entrance was dredged some 30 years ago(the old Srewart street break. I am extremely interested in forming a local group to start the ball rolling after watching and reading about Andrew Pitts plans for Cronulla in NSW. As I said sand is already being pumped and now there is a large marina nearby with Holiday accomodation units overlooking the beach. you can see the ewell come in and raise up, but most of the time it just does not break, unless it is an extremely large swell, which only happens a few times a year.