7 books you will psyche on and should totally read: What Youth

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stunet started the topic in Monday, 17 Feb 2014 at 9:08am

Here's a list that gladdens. What Youth and "7 books you will psyche on and should totally read."

http://www.whatyouth.com/2014/02/14/radical-class-2/?id=16859

I often bemoan the fact that good writing is a dying art. It ain't necessarily true but it sometimes feels that way. The yoof, it always seemed to me, could buy a Canikon for a couple hunge, flood the 'net with images, and call 'emselves artists - easy! But unlike photography there's no shortcut to good writing: no autofocus, no colour correcting software - it's hard fucken work. And the first step toward it is to read lots and lots of great writers. So yeah, glad to see the yoof - What Yoof! - spruiking seven good books. Bit limited in scope and style but a good list nonetheless.

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zenagain Friday, 26 Nov 2021 at 9:01pm

Forgot to add- haven't read 50 shades of grey and I can pretty much guarantee I wouldn't.

I didn't even know who E.L. James is.

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velocityjohnno Friday, 26 Nov 2021 at 9:14pm

"that romance is appealing because humans are at their most interesting in intimate situations."

what if they are not completely human?

https://www.amazon.com/Seduced-Doctor-Bigfoot-Attorney-Large-ebook/dp/B0...

https://www.amazon.com/Chuck-Tingle/e/B00SF2MTYK/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_...

If the internet could write romance...

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Constance B Gibson Wednesday, 8 Dec 2021 at 5:03pm
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blindboy Thursday, 9 Dec 2021 at 4:51pm

Just started "The Dawn of Everything" by Davod Graeber and David Wengrow. There has been a real buzz about this book which takes a very different view of the long history of humans on the planet based on the accumulated research of the last few decades. Not so much a critique of western civilisation as a demolition of its intellectual roots.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 9 Dec 2021 at 5:34pm

Yeah, BB...it's on my Xmas list.

Vale Graeber!

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Constance B Gibson Friday, 10 Dec 2021 at 12:24pm

A personal and wide-ranging review of the book in question...sort of.

https://www.counterpunch.org/2021/12/08/marxism-anarchism-and-the-dawn-o...

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Constance B Gibson Friday, 10 Dec 2021 at 7:42pm

'Execution Days: The Life and Times of Spencer P. Jones' is a new book by Patrick Emery which traces Spencer’s life, from his childhood in New Zealand through his evolution as a musician in Australia to his profound impact on those around him.
Based on over 150 interviews with Spencer and more than 150 family members, friends and bandmates, the book is also packed with a treasure trove of previously unseen photos."

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mattlock Friday, 10 Dec 2021 at 10:26pm

Looking forward to reading that one Constance.
I think it may be in my Christmas stocking already.
Spencer with the Nothing has been known to blow my mind.

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blindboy Saturday, 18 Dec 2021 at 8:29am

I just finished The Dawn Of Everything, so a few comments. First, it is a good read for anyone with an interest in prehistory or pre-european American cultures. It summarises decades of research that provide a more detailed and nuanced view than previously available to non-specialists. Second, it is not an unbiased interpretation of this material. As an activist for anarchist causes Graeber is clearly looking for evidence to support the view that humans, even in large numbers, do not need top down governance to live well.

The book starts with the claim that we are trapped in rigid top down states which depend on violence to maintain their authority. This violence is both internal through the police and judiciary and external through involvement in war. The point it then tries to make is that this was not inevitable and that we are capable of other kinds of arrangements. You can judge for yourself how successful these arguments are.

One of the book’s strongest points for me, is that it undermines the idea that humans were driven into agriculture by necessity. The research they quote demonstrates that the principles of agriculture and the knowledge necessary to implement it on a broad scale existed for thousands of years during which it was a supplement to foraging and hunting. Huge densely populated cities were built during this time. A further strong point is the wealth of cultural detail they include. The degree of human creativity revealed by this is inspirational and if it does not lead to anarchism, it should at least encourage deep thought about why the world is currently dominated by such powerful destructive cultures. It was not always so.

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Blowin Saturday, 18 Dec 2021 at 1:06pm

The premise was a dead give away of a bullshit book. I can’t believe you paid that grifter to promote his divisive hate speech rubbish.

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blindboy Saturday, 18 Dec 2021 at 1:27pm

Ha ha the literary critic who doesn't bother to read the book!

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Blowin Saturday, 18 Dec 2021 at 1:53pm

Sometimes you just know.

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Roystein Sunday, 2 Jan 2022 at 6:25pm

On a bit of a roll at the moment with holiday vibes providing some more time and space.
Dave Grohl’s The Storyteller - some interesting insight into one of the best musicians I believe of the last 20 years, pretty simply written but worth a look just for the anecdotes of who this bloke has crossed paths with during his life and the Kurt Cobain section was interesting. He also genuinely shares his gratitude for how music has allowed him to live his dream. P
Eddie Jaku - The Happiest Man on Earth. Please read this book. A remarkable story of a beautiful human and a reminder of love, humanity and friendships weaved against the backdrop of atrocity after atrocity. A stark reminder to be happy and have love in your heart. A book I am so grateful to have been gifted and one I will recommend to many.

I am also re-reading one of the key books from my childhood, The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay. Love this book so much.

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mikehunt207 Monday, 3 Jan 2022 at 10:04am

Have a look for 'A Pirate Of Exquisite Mind' by Diana and Michael Preston
The life of William Dampier - Explorer, Naturalist and Bucaneer
Amazing what this guy did and where he went , first person to circumnavigate the world multiple times, landed in WA 80years before Cook .
Total Hellman
Another one I just finished 'the Ghost & The Bounty Hunter' by Adam Courtenay (Bryce Courtenay,s son)
About William Buckley an escaped convict who lived with the Aboriginals of the Kulin nation around Geelong circa 1800 and John Batman who came to establish Melbourne circa 1835, very interesting.

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mattlock Friday, 7 Jan 2022 at 6:29pm

I concur on the Dampier book mike. A great read.
I especially loved the 17th century advice for treatment of constipation which involved the use of a well oiled spoon.

Have you read any Simon Winchester?

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mickseq Tuesday, 25 Jan 2022 at 6:57pm

I have just finished reading "Mans Search For Meaning" by Victor Frankl.

I am sure its been mentioned here but it was an astonishing read and highly recommended

I was taken by this in particular:

"After a while I proceeded to another
question, this time addressing myself to the
whole group. The question was whether an
ape which was being used to develop
poliomyelitis serum, and for this reason
punctured again and again, would ever be able
to grasp the meaning of its suffering.
Unanimously, the group replied that of
course it would not; with its limited
intelligence, it could not enter into the world
of man, i.e., the only world in which the
meaning of its suffering would be
understandable. Then I pushed forward
with the following question: "And what
about man? Are you sure that the human
world is a terminal point? in the evolution of the cosmos? Is it not
conceivable that there is still another
dimension, a world beyond man's world; a
world in which the question of an ultimate
meaning of human suffering would find an
answer?"

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freeride76 Tuesday, 25 Jan 2022 at 7:50pm

it's an epic book

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etarip Wednesday, 26 Jan 2022 at 12:55pm

Great recommendation mickseq.
Victor Frankl. Extraordinary book.

I’m going to reread my copy

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batfink Wednesday, 26 Jan 2022 at 11:21pm
blindboy wrote:

I just finished The Dawn Of Everything, so a few comments. First, it is a good read for anyone with an interest in prehistory or pre-european American cultures. It summarises decades of research that provide a more detailed and nuanced view than previously available to non-specialists. Second, it is not an unbiased interpretation of this material. As an activist for anarchist causes Graeber is clearly looking for evidence to support the view that humans, even in large numbers, do not need top down governance to live.

Got it for Xmas BB. Looking forward to it, but first had to finish an excellent book called ‘Qanon, and on..’ by Van Badham. I’ll write up a review in the books section.

Blowin’s dismissal of a book he knows nothing about is highly insightful…. of Blowin.

Top down governance works, exactly, nowhere.

Really interested in it as a counterpoint to ‘Sapiens’, which I thought was fantastic at the time (it was) but this argues a whole other stream. Counter arguments to the existing hegemony isn’t a big attraction for some.

Graeber’s book ‘Bullshit jobs’ was just one of the best books I have read in a long time. He died last year, most unfortunate. A man who could look through the extant bullshit of our times with a clear eye.

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TwsitedDrifter Friday, 28 Jan 2022 at 8:18pm

"Bullshit jobs" let me guess a list of made up jobs in the government and businesses that mean absolutely nothing and how to qualify for these bullshit jobs?
Sounds like a great way to earn a lot more money than any tradie or pizza shop owner on footy night.

Heres one im about to read Siddhartha by Herman Hesse, ive been sent it by a tidy friend who recommended me this, he only recommends tidy books with great depth.So looking forward to reading it.

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zenagain Friday, 28 Jan 2022 at 8:53pm

You'll love it. It's a great book.

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Roystein Wednesday, 2 Feb 2022 at 2:53pm
etarip wrote:

Great recommendation mickseq.
Victor Frankl. Extraordinary book.

I’m going to reread my copy

are usually very pleased with the recommendations on here, my copy just turned up at the door (less than 24 hours after I ordered it no less).

Will have to finsih "Belonging" by Owen Eastwood first, a recommended read for anyone working with or leading other humans in teams.

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GreenJam Wednesday, 2 Feb 2022 at 5:26pm

I Just finished 'Out of the Forest' - the story of Geoffrey Peel Smith. Described on the cover as 'The true story of a recluse'. Some may be familiar with the story - it featured as an episode on Australian Story (ABC) sometime last year. An incredible story. Mostly how he survived the decade long self-imposed battering in the hills of Goonengerry, and to come out of that and slowly rebuild health and a meaningful connection with society. I wonder if any swellnetters in the Byron region may have encountered this man, probably wandering the roadside, drunk in a park, or sleeping on the beach. Anyway, it's a worthy read.

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goofyfoot Wednesday, 2 Feb 2022 at 7:46pm
GreenJam wrote:

I Just finished 'Out of the Forest' - the story of Geoffrey Peel Smith. Described on the cover as 'The true story of a recluse'. Some may be familiar with the story - it featured as an episode on Australian Story (ABC) sometime last year. An incredible story. Mostly how he survived the decade long self-imposed battering in the hills of Goonengerry, and to come out of that and slowly rebuild health and a meaningful connection with society. I wonder if any swellnetters in the Byron region may have encountered this man, probably wandering the roadside, drunk in a park, or sleeping on the beach. Anyway, it's a worthy read.

This sounds interesting, I’m going to check it out. Thanks

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Constance B Gibson Sunday, 27 Mar 2022 at 2:44pm
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wax24 Monday, 28 Mar 2022 at 12:00am

Tried to read Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. Reminded me of trying to read The Sound And The Fury by William Faulkner. Or of trying to drink some expensive bottle of wine that i was told was amazing, but it just is too much to be very drinkable, ya know? Had to work too hard to read those. Some of my faves are Animal Farm by George Orwell, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Man In The Grey Flannel Suit by Sloane Wilson, any short story by Shirley Jackson, any short story by Jack London, Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson (for giggles), On The Road by Jack Kerouac.... Anything at all by John Steinbeck...... too many to mention em all.

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stunet Thursday, 21 Apr 2022 at 9:24am

Almost finished 'The Snowy' by Siobhan McHugh, originally published 1989, but reprinted for a 70th anniversary edition.

'The Snowy' is the Snowy Mountains Scheme, of course, first kicked off in 1949. Different times is an understatement; the sweep and scale of the Scheme will never, ever be replicated. It only got over the line by canny manouvering from scheme architect Nelson Lemmons who billed it as a national security project so the next incoming government couldn't scupper it - which they most surely would have.

In fact, Frank Packer's Daily Telegraph took regular potshots at the public money being wasted, should have been privatised or shut down etc etc so take heart that generations come and go but some things never change.

The book was written by an Irishwoman, which at first seems odd, yet as so much of the Scheme speaks to (or for) Australia's post-war changes, it helps to have someone culturally detached at the helm. Much to be said about our racial makeup, cultural flotsam, and the nature of work in post-war Australia.

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chook Thursday, 21 Apr 2022 at 10:16am

Sounds good. I must read that.
The Snowy Mountain Scheme was an ecological disaster. Destroyed the Snowy, Murray and the Murrumbidgee rivers. Damaged the whole Murrumbidgee area.

For an account of the mountains before the rivers were dammed, Kiandra To Kosciusko by Klaus Hueneke is a great read.

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Constance B Gibson Wednesday, 25 May 2022 at 10:17pm

Grabbed a fair few of my items outta the parent's storage facility of late.

A sample of the perhaps lesser known parts of the collection. All worthy.

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Michael Adam Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 8:43am

Flog.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 9:37am
Michael Adam wrote:

Flog.

AKA Beat Me Like a Red Headed Step Child?

Cool book, Michael?

Whatever floats your boat.

Speaking of which...

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 9:47am

Obviously some on here really need to have a read of this.

A good introduction.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 10:04am

Constance- Were you born in Australia? I get the vibe that you were not.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:20pm

Hahahahahahaha. "Were you born here"!?

Can any one dickhead get any more fucken obvious*?

*Rhetorical question.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:27pm

Some Crews.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:29pm
Constance B Gibson wrote:

Hahahahahahaha. "Were you born here"!?

Can any one dickhead get any more fucken obvious*?

*Rhetorical question.

Simple question requiring no more than a yes or no answer. Were you born in Australia or not? Whether you were or not means nothing to me. I’ve just got a suspicion about things which might explain your character.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:44pm

Sweetie, have a think why you think that info is important, and get back to me.

You may need the proverbial roomful of mirrors...but we live in hope.

Actually, after your little add-on, perhaps nothing explains YOUR 'character'. It's like looking for sustenance in the middle of a donut.

Didn't the 'ugly, quiet Australian' just get a hammering?

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:32pm

More Crews.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:40pm

It’s because there’s a definite subset of immigrants-of all persuasions- who retain a chip on their shoulder due to an inferiority complex they develop from not feeling to be entirely a part of the community they move to.
I suspect you might be suffering from this syndrome.
I don’t care particularly as everyone has circumstances which shape their personality one way or another and for better or for worse. Not judging you on this either way. You are who you are. I have a tendency to look for patterns in everything and this situation is something which seems to recur too often to be coincidental. There’s a basic explanation behind it.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:43pm

You and immigrants...again.

Can any one dickhead get any more fucken obvious*?

*Rhetorical question.

Actually, settler nations do have their residual hang-ups. Are you the cringing mild colonial boy...still?

Funny, Nowra explores some of THAT above. Inside the island, indeed

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flollo Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:47pm

From the UK but legendary. Plenty of this going around in 'modern' Aus.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:48pm

I’ll take that as a yes that you moved to Australia after being born elsewhere. No one is teasing you about it. No need to bristle! It does explain quite a lot.

You were just a scared little boy who didn’t feel like you belonged.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:54pm

Just have a squiz at the Indigenous thread, Flollo.

Same old, same old.

But we're getting there DESPITE some.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:53pm

"You were just a scared little boy who didn’t feel like you belonged."

Hahahahahaha. This wins. Hands down.

Psychological projection 101.

Sweetie, this is literally YOU....NOW.

Present tense.

Hahahahahahaha. Fuck, you're an idiot.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:55pm

Flollo…..you’re bristling too. Like I said,not all immigrants carrying the burden of the resentment but some do.
Plenty of expat surfers in Indo who resent the Indonesians. The same can be said of some people who’ve moved to Australia. It’s a psychological outcome and I don’t think it’s even based on anything said or done by the respective natives in any country.

You get the same result a certain percentage of times when any people contain feelings within themselves that they aren’t 100% included in community. It’s not too unusual for in laws to feel this way at a large gathering of blood relatives. Same deal.

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 1:56pm

"I have a tendency to look for patterns in everything and this situation is something which seems to recur too often to be coincidental."

Roomful of mirrors, cobber.

Hahahahahaha.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:02pm
Constance B Gibson wrote:

Just have a squiz at the Indigenous thread, Flollo.

Same old, same old.

But we're getting there DESPITE some.

Wait…you think this is about me?

Yeah, nah.

We are trying to understand the chip on your shoulder.

There’s been a few screaming instances , such as when you went on the one man crusade to show that the Oz rock scene of the 80’s was built around people from the UK.

No one , and I mean no one , gives a fuck about that stuff except a British expat with a chip on their shoulder. You kept posting examples but no one replied because no one would everthink to care except a little boy who felt he didn’t fit in amongst a nation of Australians. There’s been many examples.

Hey …maybe I’m wrong ? Maybe there’s another reason you carry resentment so proudly?

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Constance B Gibson Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:07pm

So by your faeces/thesis, you don't feel 'Australian*', Sweetie...'cos you've only been here 5 minutes so to speak?

*remembering this is a construct of a coupla hundred years or so.

Wait up, you are an 'Australian' - the 5 minute type - but not of this land...the real type.

And this is why you are constantly at war mainly with yourself. You don't belong and worse, feel weird about those that do. And what's been done to' em.

Cool thinking, cobber. Hah!

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flollo Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:06pm
DudeSweetDudeSweet wrote:

Flollo…..you’re bristling too. Like I said,not all immigrants carrying the burden of the resentment but some do.
Plenty of expat surfers in Indo who resent the Indonesians. The same can be said of some people who’ve moved to Australia. It’s a psychological outcome and I don’t think it’s even based on anything said or done by the respective natives in any country.

You get the same result a certain percentage of times when any people contain feelings within themselves that they aren’t 100% included in community. It’s not too unusual for in laws to feel this way at a large gathering of blood relatives. Same deal.

This is true, I know people like this. Some very old, lived here for 40-50 years.

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DudeSweetDudeSweet Thursday, 26 May 2022 at 2:06pm

That’s another classic giveaway.

The old “Hey …you’re not a real Australian either! “

Yeah,nah. Come on mate. Being two dimensional doesn’t help your cause.