What's what?

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Shatner'sBassoon started the topic in Friday, 6 Nov 2015 at 7:48pm

AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING KALEIDOSCOPIC JOIN-THE-DOTS/ADULT COLOURING BOOK EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT IN NARCISSISTIC/ONANISTIC BIG PICTURE PARASITIC FORUM BLEEDING.

LIKE POLITICAL LIFE, PARTICIPATION IS WELCOME, ENCOURAGED EVEN, BUT NOT NECESSARY.

blindboy's picture
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blindboy commented Thursday, 14 Dec 2017 at 10:28pm

Thanks Blowin. Wouldn't it be boring if we all agreed? Look I understand that it is easy to associate immigration with more competition for jobs and so lower wages. The problem is that there is no substantial evidence for that position and plenty of other possible explanations for low wage growth, as outlined in the article. I think the things they list are more significant than immigration, but accept it is a matter of opinion in the absence of conclusive evidence.

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Gaz1799 commented Thursday, 14 Dec 2017 at 10:41pm

Well today it finally happened.

Received a job application from a Filipino diesel mechanic on a 457 visa looking for work in rural sa. His resume' has long stints all over the world.
The saddest part is its actually a pretty strong resume' too. I'm half considering interviewing him just to see what his rate is.

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Blowin commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 9:52am

Here's a start BB.

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2017/12/australias-infernal-perpertual-...

And if you're wondering why NSW is so intent on pushing for the rebuild of the stadiums , it goes beyond appeasing a mincing shock jock and the NRL racket.

It's a way for the government to pour infrastructure construction dollars into Sydney without land acquisition costs or extensive planning delays.

Got to prop up the ponzi shitfight that is Sydney !

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blindboy commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 10:36am

I agree with much of that but the first issue for me is global population growth, some of which I think it is reasonable, and in our interests, to absorb. The second issue is cultural diversity and the advantages that brings with it in domestic and international terms. If we want to do business with other countries, fluent, culturally aware Australian citizens are the way to go. In terms of the article it is worth considering one of the fundamental characteristics of economists, that they are great at predicting everything except the future, so while the article makes some interesting points it is almost certainly a long way from what will actually happen. I see there's swell due in Bali, go hard!

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Blowin commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 1:48pm

Why is it reasonable for us to absorb global population growth ?

Nigeria is on the way to becoming a population bomb , but to suggest that maybe dad should pull out once in a while is declared racist and meddling in their sovereignty. Fuck it , let them wallow in their self created mess.

And how much of this outrageous influx of immigrants does Australia still need to facilitate trade ?

There's already over half the Australian population born overseas including a million people of Chinese descent ?

Anymore Chinese and we'll BE China , let alone appeasing their desire to only transact with a fellow countryman.

Does the desire to conduct or lubricate trade within a cultural boundaries even amount to much ? You think that Japan isn't going to want our dirt cheap LNG or China isn't going to want or iron ore or all our agricultural land and water sources if they're not greeted by an immigrant frontman ?

That is bullshit of course.

All the economic predictions that are being made have been played out over the last decade plus - the era of Mass immigration has borne witness to a decline in living standards for Australians. We are not seeing any real or sustained benefit beyond a cute night out at an exotic restaurant . The fact that many nice people are immigrants is not reason to overwhelm our country with humanity.

Do you think that Bali has improved with the injection of millions more people ? Do you think that Canggu is a better place since it's become a western cultural ghetto ?

PS Surf very small this morning , chest to head high and not too inspiring with the high tide .....but the pulse is coming ! Got a couple just because being in that water is a gift.

This arvo should see some action .

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sypkan commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 2:42pm

".... including a million people of Chinese descent ?"

Is that right?

If so, that is a bit fucked up, and totally unbalanced.

If there is a moral imperative to immigration I think people would be much more open to it if we were helping our immediate neighbours more. ie. Indo. Papua timor etc.

I know for a fact that the chinese and indians have worked out how to game the system better than anyone else - well except supposed 'rufugees' anyway, but let's not go there.

It is also a well known fact that remmittance payments do way more to helping alleviate world poverty than any overblown aid budgets, as individual people are inherently way more smarter with money than big arse government departments and other agencies.

These are the things we should be talking about if we want to address any moral inperatives whilst encouraging migration.

Its a fucking disgrace that we pretty much only help the already wealthy to escape their shitholes leaving their surrounding neighbours (and ours) wallowing in poverty.

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blindboy commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 2:57pm

If you want the main cause of Australia's economic problems you have to go back to Picketty. In a capitalist system, when the return on investment exceeds productivity growth, inequality will increase unless governments take strong action. That is the core of the problem. As wealth is concentrated in fewer and fewer hands it chases ever more speculative investments. People on low and middle incomes spend their money on goods and services that create employment. The rich cannot possibly spend their incomes so they "invest" it in non-productive schemes. Why do I care about people in other countries? We only have one planet, we are all in this together. The isolationist Aussie Aussie Uber Alles approach is short sighted, to say the least.

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Blowin commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 5:01pm

So you think that the idea of marine parks and conservation reserves are short sighted and based in ignorant patriotism ?

Same principle as preserving the remaining natural character of Australia. Destroying EVERYWHERE benefits no one.

Maybe the people that are currently fucking over their own countries through unrestrained over breeding are the ones you should be preaching to regarding looking after the planet.

If someone trashed their own house through wilful mismanagement and blatant disregard for their only shelter you'd then bend over backwards to let them stay at your place ?

It just leads to both houses being trashed.

And rather than referring to Picketty's irrelevant theories consider that their isnt many great returns on speculative investment these days.

Gas plants , mines and casinos. A bit of infrastructure, which is very thin on the ground these days. The wealthy are hiding their money rather than reinvesting - that's the destructive component of modern taxation systems.

Apple , Google and a Microsoft alone have $465 Billion dollars between them stashed in tax havens. Rather than speculative investments they are just not investing due to getting canned by the taxman as soon as they attempt to repatriate their money.

Thus Trump's tax breaks are a great idea. It brings shed loads of cash back for reinvesting in the states.

For the same reason Turnbulls tax breaks for business are a garbage idea as the companies affected are mostly foreign owned so their cash gets repatriated in their home lands and Australia loses both tax and investment.

Maybe the speculation you're referring to is the property market ? It being the only gig in town . Too bad it's also a net negative on Australia's finances as it's all funded with offshore capital .

The fact that this ridiculous game of financial musical chairs is perpetuated by the stupidly overzealous Big Australia proponents that continue to flood our country with zero benefit mass immigration brings us back to our discussion nicely.

Now I'll just go and google Picketty.....

PS The Aussie Aussie uber allies remark is well into the realm of an ad hominem for our entire nation.

You do realise that the point of that accusation was bent and blunted beyond recognition when the white Australia policy expired ?

Australia is a far from a homogenous mass of Anglo descendants and the idea that we have enough people already encompasses ALL that are already here.

Too many people is too many people . To frame it as xenophobia when the country is already changed beyond all recognition is disengenuous and farcical.

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Blowin commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 6:15pm

Ummmm....I looked into Picketty and he's not as irrelevant as I thought.

My mistake.

But you're barking up the wrong tree thinking that inequality stems primarily from the allocation of capital.

It's the tools to retain wealth of which tax minimisation is just one that the problem can be found.

There is plenty of money in Australia , it's just that the workers don't get a look in due to the other tools of wealth retention such as flooding the labour market which leads to competition for jobs and downward pressure on wages .Then capital compounds the approach by flooding it with cheap or free labour that both undercut those legitimate workers who work for the society mandated minimum and have a tax burden placed on top.

These are immigrant workers. Also tax avoiders so they not only reduce our wage standard they also are a net drain on the community as they pay little or no tax.

Another tool in the search for greater profits / increased inequality is to destroy organised labour such as unions.

Most immigrants will never join a union as they are hesitant to upset their employer / sponsor or because they are not legal, registered employees to start with .

Then there is inherent cultural resistance to organised labour. The idea of which is foreign to most cultures and thus their poor standards of living. They bring that culture with them which undermines Australian wage standards.

Result : Declining wages and decreasing standards of living as witnessed throughout the country for the last few years.

Meanwhile - MSM economists and the paid mouthpieces of the vested interests that run our society feign ignorance as to why this situation exists.

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blindboy commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 5:50pm

Slowly moving closer together on this Blowin. My perspective is global because that is the way things work, that is how the inequalities are generated by straight out tax avoidance as shown in the Panama Papers. Remember the first tranche of data, from one of numerous companies involved in global tax avoidance revealed that the tax stolen from African nations in the last decade exceeds the total national debt of all African nations. This was the money that would have built schools, roads and hospitals. This is the money that would have raised standards of living so that families became smaller. This is why you cannot just deal with things on a national level. The big money laughs and moves on. Yes we need to protect our national interests but the only way to do that is to stop the outright theft of our national wealth and the wealth of other countries. You think immigration interferes with this, I think it helps. Same goal, different paths, hard to pick on available evidence.

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Blowin commented Saturday, 16 Dec 2017 at 8:03am

The minute that you realise that the concept of mass immigration was not conceptualised through a desire to extend the international hand of friendship and that it was actually created to extend the leverage of the global corporations that dictate western political policies, is the minute you realise that it's not a good thing for the country on the receiving end.

Surely it must shine a light on the fundamental driving force behind the modern western preoccupation with mass immigration when you find that it's pushed hardest by those that campaign the most tirelessly for Neoliberalism- The LNP.

You realise that the African nations are defrauded out of their sustaining tax dollars by the neoliberalists , yet you openly encourage the tactics of the same neoliberalists to manipulate western nations through the immigration initiatives that they dictate to our governing bodies.

If the LNP is all about it then doesn't it give you pause to question why they're so infatuated with the idea ? Because it disenfranchises and disharmonises the labour force .

Unfortunately Labor, who should be championing the Australian citizen worker ( of whichever origin ) has lost all insight and ability to oppose effectively due to their constant battle for self preservation and loss of fundamental political identity.

This leads them to pander to the divisive cultural factions that have formatted within Australia in order to shore up electoral blocs. The consequent prioritisation of the immigrant vote has seen them lose the Australia workers that constituted their original representative demographic .

So if LNP wants mass immigration to destabilise Australia's labour force and Labor wants mass immigration to shore up votes .....what's in it for Australia ?

Fuck all.

Crowds. Degraded environment. Over stressed infrastructure. Undue pressure on our fragile island homes ability to sustain us. Worsening standards of living. Worsening quality of life.

You say that an influx of foreign flavour enhances the cultural diversity in Australia and I'd agree with you . But when HALF of our country was born overseas- and that equates to 12 Million people - then I'd say that any future benefits from further diversity are well and truly overshadowed by the negatives of the pure unsustainable mass of humanity we are squeezing in to the habitable margins of this country.

Any continued expansion of humanity is just an arms race between two opposing political powers that should be relegated to the garbage bin and their respective puppeteers exposed and expunged from any place of influence over our nation's future.

PS You realise the irony when you say that large family size is connected to poor standard of living ?

So with the continuation of mass immigration to Australia and its inherent and visible downward pressure on our standard of living - doesn't that just forsee a future increase in family sizes here ?

Which leads to further population growth and further reduction in standard of living and further increase in family sizes which leads to further population growth which leads to reduction in standard of living which leads to increased family sizes which leads to....ad infinitum .

Next thing we'll be looking for another country to migrate to .

But it'll be too late cause everywheres fucked.

Thus the relevance of the marine park concept. There is no benefit to the world if it's all fucked equally.

No one wins.

Particularly the planet and the other non humanoid life forms that inhabit it.

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blindboy commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 7:54pm

I am more optimistic in some ways than you Blowin. I think the neo-liberal era will come to an end in my lifetime and things will swing back towards more reasonable social and economic policies. Another crisis like 2008 could occur at any time and the methods they used to protect the wealthy then, will not work again. This would open the door to genuine reform minded politicians. The milennials have every reason to vote for reform. They have been absolutely shafted. The baby boomers, who stand to gain from the status quo, are dying out. How this will all play out is impossible to predict so I acknowledge that there is the risk of the thieving bastards getting such a firm grip on power that it cannot be shaken, but I think history suggests not.

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Blowin commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 8:09pm

The millennials have been raised on the false premise that infinite immigration equals never diminishing returns.

They've swallowed the bait to their guts and are taught at every turn in their formal upbringings to never be skeptical that there's a hook.

They'll suffer more than you or me.

As it is they can't even get a job with the cheaper -by -the -dozen uni degrees that they were told was a golden ticket to riches by those wishing to cook the employment statistics , let alone ever owning a house with a bit of space to raise their kids.

Maybe you're right about the next biggest and best economic shock . Though I'm prone to suspecting the outcome will be as much of an orchestrated assault on the hapless base of the financial pyramid as the last one. Only this time it'll be Australia under the axe instead of Greece.

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blindboy commented Friday, 15 Dec 2017 at 9:47pm

Blowin read this and tell me Trump is a force for good.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/15/america-extreme-poverty-...

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sypkan commented Saturday, 16 Dec 2017 at 1:54am

I hate to continue my reign as chief of the blowin fanclub, but I reckon that post at 15/12/17 7.05pm should be published in newspapers across australia as a good description of what is currently happeing in oz and across the world. But it would never happen, as it would not serve the current vested interest's malicious machine.

And, I hate to criticise blindboy again, because I really do respect what you do and your passion. But, I think the baby boomer conglomorate is hanging on tooth and nail to ideas and dogma that did serve the post WW11 generation well, and endeavoured to make the world a better place, however times, and the world, have changed significantly in recent times, not least due to the internet and improvements in transport, changing the rules, and the whole game all together.

While it has become common place for nearly everyone to now bag neo-liberalism. As blowin points out, a key part of neo-liberalism is the liberalisation of trade and free movement of people to enable the trade of goods, labour, and services. Be it for good or ill is open to debate. What people like blindboy appear to be overlooking, or conveniently ignoring in their zeal for high migration, is how much a key part high migration is to the neo-liberal machine. You are feeding it.

I'm definitely no expert, and I may be stating the bleeding obvious, but it seems a key part of the initial post war 'liberalism' (before the neo bit ramped everything up significantly) was to unite people across a wartorn europe, by entangling them through commerce and the mutual benefit of distribution of resources, ideas and wealth.

This all worked rather well initially, culminating in the european union. The neo bit has endeavoured to do the same on a global scale, engaging asia and other regions in a model that did work pretty well the first time around, cue globalisation.

However, this second go at it failed to recognise the already gross inequality between and within regions. Inequality well beyond anything post WW11, and has just exacerbated inequality, both between and within regions, especially with the uneven distribution of access to technologies. At the same time, utilising developing countries as factories for the west's consumption has just increased environmental degradation tenfold with devastating outcomes.

It is well accepted that gross inequality only leads to destabilisation of societies. While globalisation may have had good intentions, it appears to have been a massive failure, as it has only widened the gaps across the world between the rich and poor. One could argue this widening would have happened anyway, considering this unique time where technogies are developing so fast. Either way gross-gross inequality is what we now have. With societies too hungry, too competitive, too dispensible, too desperate, and too under developed to ask for cleaner environments. It's a long long way off before they find that place japan found circa 1970s where they said enough is enough! we need to breathe, and we want clean waterways.

So, we are at this weird place where liberalisation of trade and movement of people isn't really working at all, it's just exacebating the gaps between the haves and have nots. Both in terms of wealth, and access to the means to generate it, whilst destroying the planet in this time of supposed environmental awareness.

I really don't know where I'm going with this, but it seems the leaders of the baby boomer generation (both the nasty capitalists and those hoping for a better world) are desperately holding onto the ideas and methods that were the zietghiest of their time for a better world, and their millenial children have just fallen into line, hoping all will be well if we are all just a little bit nicer to each other. Whereas, it seems, gen xers can see that shit ain't going so well, and we're inheriting a bit of a mess.

As I said, I'm not sure where I'm heading with this, but I do know, there's a lot of people not overly happy with the way things are, and where they are heading. And it seems, we are bogged down with the idealism of the boomers time, with the left fighting petty battles that really don't seem that important anymore in the bigger scheme of things while the world turns to shit.

You might be happy to wait for full meltdown to evoke change blindboy but I am not. The left needs new ideas and methods now!! not when we're on the cusp of disaster!

And on top of all this, gen xers kids have buckleys of affording the australian dream in their own country due to the leaders of our time literally selling off the farm, along with anything else that isn't nailed down.

Joy, pleasant times ahead.

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GuySmiley commented Saturday, 16 Dec 2017 at 2:16am

Without reading recent earlier comments I agreed with most of that Sypkan but wonder about the last 2 paragraphs.

To me neo-liberalism is much more than trade liberalisation; the theory is largely about government not getting in the way of people and business organising the (so-called) efficient use of resources and labour. I repeat the theory not the practice. Government and taxes under neo-liberal principles must therefore be as small as possible. Neo-liberalism is a product of the right of politics not the left - Reagan, Thatcher, Howard (here).

In a neo-libeal world taxes are typically viewed as bad and they need to be lowered as much as possible because the theory says governments waste or inefficiently spend it and further high taxes lower the reward for individual effort (sound familiar? we got this a lot from Hockey and Abbott - i.e. the right). What neo-liberalism fails to see about tax is people expect government to provide properly funded services like education, health and, importantly in terms of wealth distribution, welfare payments for people who fall in the cracks. Again, in theory how can you have low taxes and properly funded services? well you save money by getting private enterprise to do it don't you e.g. the dismantling of the TAFE system here ... well that didn't work so well did it!

The importance of a properly funded welfare system is mostly lost in neo-liberalism. As you point out correctly it is failing and wealth distribution in and between economies around the world highlight glaring inequity. There are studies plotting income gaps and community satisfaction and unsurprisingly communities are most (dis)satisfied where the gaps are large or small. The happiest "developed" countries are those that are relatively high taxing, have well funded services, value their teachers and nurses and pay reasonable welfare for those that cannot work ... e.g. the Scandinavian countries. Unsurprisingly, countries like the US where private enterprise is king and initiatives like publicly funded health care is seen by those with wealth as socialism the communities are recording very high dissatisfaction levels ........

and so in the rust belts of the US we saw high support for change, any change, so they voted Trump and in the UK most areas outside the (relative) prosperous London vote for Brexit.

I agree neo-liberalism has failed to deliver for people (there's been no trickle down) but politically this failure is fracturing the right as evidence by what has and is happening inside the Republican Party in the US and even in the LNP here ... should we go further to the right or back to the centre? that debate is raging in conservative parties right now.

I also believe the left has been suckered into go to the right of there natural centre left policy positions and they do need to return back to the ideological "happy place" but I disagree its the left's natural historical position to have high migration.

On immigration both sides need to listen to what people are saying but its been decades of lazy economic policy, an easy way to increase demand and productivity and business LOVE it so it will be a hard practice to stop, but stop it must ... because just like in the US or in the UK it will be the one issue that will unite voters from the right and the left.

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blindboy commented Saturday, 16 Dec 2017 at 8:07am

I have to mention Picketty again as he nails the fatal flaw in neo-liberalism and how it leads to greater inequality within nations. That said, global poverty has fallen dramatically. Anyone who has been visiting Indonesia over the last 4 decades would have seen that first hand. Then there is China. Globalisation has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of deep poverty. This is a simple undeniable fact. To condemn it for the problems it has caused in developed economies therefore has no ethical standing. Globalisation has failed only in its inability, to this point, to maintain and enforce a fair tax regime on wealthy corporations and individuals as shown in the Panama Papers. The inequalities that exist within nations are the consequence of poor governance, not globalisation. Big contradiction in there sypkan, you mention the free movement of people in the context of free trade. Money, goods and services move freely aroun the globe. It is only people who are restricted, justify that if you can.

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batfink commented Saturday, 16 Dec 2017 at 6:48pm

"The millennials have been raised on the false premise that infinite immigration equals never diminishing returns."

I'm not sure I would agree with that blowin, but otherwise agree with you. The millennials were certainly fed it, but I'm not sure they are still buying it, and I can tell with some experience that the generation behind them are completely over the neo-liberal experiment, except for that very small club of young liberals, surely the saddest of all human life forms.

There is hope in the young un's, I tells ya.

" the theory is largely about government not getting in the way of people and business organising the (so-called) efficient use of resources and labour."

Guy, that is a fundamental belief that drives so much of neo-liberalism and you are right to say 'so-called'. The last 10 years has shown clearly that people and business are actually the worst places to find efficiency, and the reason is based in the profit motive. The electricity market in Oz, and the NBN debacle are poster examples of the inefficiency of relying on the profit motive to deliver essential public services.

Cheers gents.

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GuySmiley commented Sunday, 17 Dec 2017 at 9:49pm

Blowin invites the Labor Party and religious organisations to go procreate themselves on the basis of some award deal yet votes One Nation who voted with Turnbull to end weekend penalty rates for some of the economy's poorest paid, yeah you will need to explain the logic of that.

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Blowin commented Sunday, 17 Dec 2017 at 10:29pm

.

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Sheepdog commented Saturday, 23 Dec 2017 at 8:28pm

"EXAMINE ALMOST ANY CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PROBLEM, FROM AUSTRALIA’S GROWING ECONOMIC INEQUALITY TO THE DECLINING PERFORMANCE OF OUR SCHOOL STUDENTS RELATIVE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD, TO OUR DYING CORAL REEFS, AND YOU WILL FIND THE FINGERPRINTS OF JOHN WINSTON HOWARD."

https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2017/12/23/its-all-joh...

Sheepdog

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Blowin commented Saturday, 23 Dec 2017 at 11:00pm

The alleged declining standard of education is because a significant percentage of the students either don't have English as their first language or they've had to learn it as they progress through the school system.

These kids aren't stupid , it's just that a language barrier is a temporary yet inconvenient impediment to learning.

As a result it makes the statistics that describe our international ranking on education standards look bad. That doesn't mean that the standard of education being provided for Aussie kids is worse than what it previously was but if you misread the statistics then it's an easy claim to make for those that way inclined.

Unless John Howard has been eating their homework it's not his fault.

Unless you want to establish why there are such large numbers of children of recent immigrants in the school system in the first place and then you are correct , it is partly John Howard's fault.

Good article in your link though. I agree with a lot of it.

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happyasS commented Saturday, 23 Dec 2017 at 9:23pm

well in fairness he did start the beginnings of a soverign wealth fund...but unfortunately he sold telstra to do it, and look where we are now with that problem.

the SMSF generosities were well beyond proportional fairness. just ridiculous.

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GuySmiley commented Saturday, 23 Dec 2017 at 9:41pm

Great article Sheepdog, summarises beautifully what I have thought of Howard for years. History ought to judge him and his prime ministership very poorly. Oh the irony of Costello's "have a baby for the nation" - those babies have just had $2.2 billion ripped out of their university funding.

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GuySmiley commented Sunday, 24 Dec 2017 at 10:22am

http://www.theage.com.au/world/rupert-murdoch-and-donald-trump-a-friends...

It makes sense ... Trump likes grabbing them and Murdoch is the biggest one I know!

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GuySmiley commented Sunday, 24 Dec 2017 at 10:22am

http://www.theage.com.au/world/rupert-murdoch-and-donald-trump-a-friends...

It makes sense ... Trump likes grabbing them and Murdoch is the biggest one I know!

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Blowin commented Sunday, 31 Dec 2017 at 3:52pm
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Blowin commented Sunday, 31 Dec 2017 at 3:55pm

Guysmiley : You never justified your Labor vote !

Labor's big Australia = worsening standards of living for traditional Labor voters.

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GuySmiley commented Sunday, 31 Dec 2017 at 5:46pm

Blowin, I'm not a rusted on Labor voter but I strongly disagree, as you do, with their approach to big immigration numbers. No different to the LNP nor the Greens. Lazy economics. I see it as part of the malaise that has seen politics skank to the right. We do need an open debate about this issue but I cannot see that happening as its highly emotive and votes can be won or lost on how politicians appeal to the lowest common denominator.

I'm pretty conservative when it comes to citizenship meaning we shouldn't hand it out too easily as we do now across the whole range of programs that see people come here. The numbers we do accept, whatever that number is, ought to be sustainable - infrastructure and environment.

I also see this issue linked to foreign aid, we should spend more overseas helping people lift their living standards in their own homelands.

Where we differ is I don't see Hanson as the answer, the answer rests in the sensible middle and she's neither sensible or in the middle.

Happy New Year

did you see the SBS doco on the Cronulla riots the other night? Catchup TV if you missed it, well worth a gander.

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Blowin commented Sunday, 31 Dec 2017 at 6:22pm

This is pretty huge, I reckon.

Kelly Slater : Best surfer to ever walk the Earth who ascribes his lazer focus and utter uncompromised literality as the secret to his dominance of the surfing world.

Totally opposed to drugs . Preaching them as the obvious and sad down fall of several of the sports greats.

Now watch him reeling from his first trip and see how easily he could morph into a Lennon spectacled , afghan walking drug guru .

http://beachgrit.com/2017/12/slater-find-god-via-psychadelics/

Reinvention....it's evolution man !

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simba commented Sunday, 31 Dec 2017 at 9:57pm

geeze i wouldn't mind trying it judging by the look on his face.
but here is a bit more about the experience

https://cleancuisine.com/ayahuasca-ceremony/

simba

eat-your-vegies's picture
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eat-your-vegies commented Sunday, 31 Dec 2017 at 9:57pm

Jeez , imagine how he’s gunna surf now with the zen force of the cosmic universe shunting him through turns . Tomo might have to step up a notch.

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davetherave commented Monday, 1 Jan 2018 at 5:31am

Sheepy, little johnny should have been into bat at yorkeys that day. We would have used corkies and had the stupid bastard ducking for cover. May 2018 be wonderful for you.

davetherave

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blindboy commented Monday, 1 Jan 2018 at 1:15pm

Thanks for the link Blowin. Who would have guessed that colonic irrigation could be a life changing experience? Still, probably not for me!

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Blowin commented Monday, 1 Jan 2018 at 5:16pm

Colonic irrigation changed my life.

I'll never make the mistake of having a delicate parquet flooring feature at the entrance to my bathroom again , that's for sure.

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stunet commented Tuesday, 2 Jan 2018 at 1:37pm

@Blowin,

"worsening standards of living for traditional Labor voters." What would you have said to Hawkey when he was proposing his great reforms? They would, prima facie, have appeared terrible for Labor voters, no? And yet they brought unbridled prosperity to Australians of all classes.

Not saying Labor's Big Australia thing is necessarily good, just that...well, shit can be complicated.

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Blowin commented Tuesday, 2 Jan 2018 at 3:38pm

Which of Hawkes reforms ?

Privatising Commonwealth bank etc ? I'd say they're as garbage now as they were then .

I'm not talking about the potential for worsening standards of living. I'm describing the very real current and ongoing worsening standards of living.

Lowest wages growth in 60 years coupled with the highest pricing of housing at the bottom of the interest rate cycle ? Nice combination.

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davetherave commented Tuesday, 2 Jan 2018 at 4:15pm

Unbridled prosperity because of China mainly. But how can one truly prosper when air is your most valuable commodity and your neighborhood is polluting the fuck out of it because of your get rich quick schemes? All our main problems are due to our failure to see our interconnected relationship to each other and biosphere earth.

davetherave

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Sheepdog commented Tuesday, 2 Jan 2018 at 5:07pm

Happy new year Dave the biscuit boy rave. Hey tell Morky I left a birthday message on his fb, AND emailed him.... But he's gone missing...
Probably at 1/2 moon bay pounding the flesh.
Cheers mate :)

Sheepdog

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davetherave commented Tuesday, 2 Jan 2018 at 8:34pm

And they went and built a marina there those pillocks. Fb and me in rocky relationship, I told zuckafucka he was selling my privacy and was a criminal. Hence it is a nightmare to use. May be doing tour, the raver's at a venue near you in 2018. St kilda to make the eight with the mighty hawks.

davetherave

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blindboy commented Wednesday, 3 Jan 2018 at 9:28am
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blindboy commented Thursday, 4 Jan 2018 at 3:00pm

Laugh or cry as you see fit. Farce and tragedy so closely interwoven!
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/michael-wolff-fire-and-fury...

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blindboy commented Sunday, 7 Jan 2018 at 8:08pm
Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Sunday, 7 Jan 2018 at 8:43pm

Yes , I do agree with virtually all of it.

Don't you ?

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blindboy commented Monday, 8 Jan 2018 at 8:12am

I agree with the idea that the Democrats are using the Russian issues to hide their unwillingness to address the real problems facing the US. I have said all along that the Clinton nomination was appalling and this piece supports that view. Despite that I think the piece under states the significance of Trump's links to Russia which, it seems to me, are far beyond justification and will cause him to be impeached or forced to resign before his term is up.

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Blowin commented Monday, 8 Jan 2018 at 8:54am

What links to Russia ?

And if he indeed has any , how is that a defineably bad thing ?

You don't think that private USA business has inextricable links to Russia ?

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stunet commented Monday, 8 Jan 2018 at 10:19am

In the words of none other than Steve Bannon, and uttered less than 24 hrs ago: "they [the Russians] are duplicitous, cunning and not our friends."

Blowin's picture
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Blowin commented Monday, 8 Jan 2018 at 10:26am

But you believe everything else Steve Bannon says.....not.

And of course the same is indelibly true regarding China's relationship with the USA yet the financial ties between the countries couldn't be thicker.

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blindboy commented Monday, 8 Jan 2018 at 10:43am

I am reading a biography of Kruschev at the moment who tried unsuccessfully through-out the 1960s to engage the US in serious disarmament talks. Eisenhower and Kennedy both had opportunities to build constructive relations with the Soviet Union but did not take them. In my judgement the fundamental cause of the hostility between Russia and the US rests in the constant expansion of US military power and its willingness to use it. Russia's strategy in surrounding itself with client states is a rational response to the perceived US threat, as is North Korea's determination to build a nuclear arsenal.