Drone photography disturbing endangered ospreys at iconic surf break .

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eddiewouldgo started the topic in Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 6:55pm
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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 6:56pm

"Terry Dennis, who conducted the first comprehensive survey of the population between 2008 and 2010, said refuges around breeding sites were a vital tool to ensure the eagle’s long-term survival.

“Large eagles don’t defend their nests against people, and when approached, they loft and move away to watch the nest from a distance,” he said.

“Most people don’t realise they’re creating disturbance … lots of things can happen to those eggs and small young when left unattended.

“It could be as simple as closing a walking trail or vehicle track within a certain distance of a nest during the crucial part of the season. We know these birds are in decline, so we have to do something.”

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 2:27am
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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 9:43pm
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eddiewouldgo commented Sunday, 5 Nov 2017 at 1:58am
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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 8:41pm
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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 9:06pm

"Visitors should avoid disturbing nest sites and no approaches should be made to nesting areas.
These birds are particularly sensitive to approaches being made from above the nest and during the breeding season especially,
a wide berth should be made around the nesting area. Adult birds which fly above the nest emitting distress calls are a sure
sign of disturbance and visitors should retreat immediately."

http://www.naturalresources.sa.gov.au/kangarooisland/news/131022-confere...

"A drone pilot can operate illegally while being hidden in a distant vantage point. The chance of on site apprehension is slim. Yet part of the CASA review involved after the fact capture such as when a user uploads their illegally shot video to the internet. "The rules protect people, property and aircraft from drones," Mr Carmody told the ABC. A pilot was fined $1,440 for flying in Sydney Harbour restricted airspace, and flying within 30 metres of people. Aside from CASA’s new laws, the National Parks and Wildlife Service recently updated their regulations to state that drones cannot fly within 300 metres of migrating whales. The maximum penalty for anyone caught breaching that law is $110,000 and two years jail."

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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 9:10pm

http://www.publish.csiro.au/MU/MU07009

"An exclusion zone has been set up around rare osprey nests on South Australia's west coast.
Bob Minnican, from the Friends of Sceale Bay, says the group has successfully lobbied to help protect endangered ospreys that have been in the area for more than 200 years.
He says the noise of jet skis near the nests has a detrimental effect on the habitat.
Mr Minnican says there is now a hefty penalty for anyone caught breaking the law.
"It's a maximum $10,000 fine and two years in jail, so it's a very significant penalty," he said.
"I think that's done because these are an endangered species that's been listed.
"These are non-migratory birds, there's probably less than 50 pair(s) in South Australia, most of them on the Eyre Peninsula, so they're very significant and they are under threat like all these other shore birds."

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2008-06-02/osprey-protection-zone-for-sa/2...

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tubeshooter commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 9:31pm

As an old sea dog I know of many osprey nests on the east coast. Many are located near or on Marine Radio stations ,and sometimes we build special ones just for them around heavily populated and utilised areas.,I've hand fed many and had them take a small fish from my fingers at top speed. Watched one steal my mates pet budgie off his shoulder on a boat , no shit..As far as human traffic goes , I've watched them going about their business catching small fish out of a creek on a packed Australia Day weekend. The sea eagles on the beaches I fish don't mind picking off anything undersized I throw back in the shorey either, and are quite willing to follow the old 4wd if I change location.
Of course respect should be shown to these birds ,especially during nesting season, but I,m not sure closing access to anything is going to help, and obviously flying a drone near a nesting predatory bird is totally stupid , chances are you won't get it back.
These birds will not abandon a nest lightly, and even if they watch it from a distance they will come back to smash a cheeky goanna or any other opportunist . Perhaps there maybe other reasons to look at if it's a localised problem, ie food , disease , genetics etc
But thanks Eddie , not having a go, awareness is always a good thing.

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barley commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 10:00pm

There is 2 main ones in sa that do it. Both are from adelaide, which speaks volumes..i heard the breeding pair have left monnies?

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 6:37pm
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barley commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 10:24pm

I have been told the raptors have left monies?..

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tubeshooter commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 10:43pm

Perhaps the crew at Swellnet could take a stroll over to river mouth at Kingscliff and see if the Osprey who live next to the coast guard tower are either indignant or indifferent of their arrival.

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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 10:53pm

Barley they were positively seen recently (Sept"17)
Someone certainly did see (either one or two) at the nest.
That was after a nine month absence.

If humans respect the territory and Cease droning , then the raptors most probably should return.
The pair of raptor around cummins monument have another nest a few km south . This is usually common for a pair to have two nests in close proximity.
They are still in the area at that nest and therefore could return if the conditions are favorable.
Everyone should give the osprey respect or they will vacate the nest .
This would be a shame if they left, all most likely because surfers prioritized filming over preservation of nature.

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barley commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 11:06pm

Man, we saw a breeding pair up near streaky and its always so wicked to see how huge their nests are apart from other things...

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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 11:32pm

Endangered listing in SA .

The breeding population in South Australia was estimated at 52 pairs in 2005 (Dennis 2007a).
The population suffered a sizeable contraction in range and a possible concurrent decline in population size during the 20th century.
Eastern Ospreys bred at Spencer Gulf (including Port Germein, Mambray Creek, Port Broughton and Corny Point) in the early to mid 1900s, but each of these sites has been vacant for more than 50 years. Pairs also formerly bred along the lower Murray River, with the most recent records of breeding activity from near Waikerie (breeding sites occupied in 1974 but deserted thereafter) (Dennis 2007a) and near Nildottie (breeding recorded in 1980) (Robinson 1980).
In South Australia, some breeding sites on Eyre Peninsula and Kangaroo Island are considered vulnerable to human disturbance (Dennis 2007a).

The current main threat to the Eastern Osprey in Australia is loss, degradation or alteration of habitat for urban or tourism development (Clancy 1989, 1991; Dennis 2007a; Olsen 1998).

http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.pl?taxo...

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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 11:43pm

"When speaking to the lady at the Ceduna Information Centre, she said we were very lucky to have seen them.
Lucky? No – we were thrilled."

Bloggers awesome close up photos of the ospreys in nest .

https://clare-n-dean.com/2015/11/04/what-else-we-found/#comments

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eddiewouldgo commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 11:52pm

“At Cummings Monument (Eyre Peninsula), I had a couple of Osprey trying to nail the drone,” Jesse said. “I’ve had a fair few birds try and knock it out of the sky and even had a swarm of bees try and take it down, because it sounds like a swarm of bees.”

http://www.victorharbortimes.com.au/story/4473591/a-new-way-to-look-at-t...

https://open.abc.net.au/explore/149701

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middy commented Friday, 3 Nov 2017 at 11:55pm

Their are distinct differences between Raptors on the East Coast and those on the West Coast of South Australia. The Rainforests and River systems of Queensland and NSW provide prolific habitat and nest sites for both Ospreys and White Bellied Sea Eagles from which they range to fish and feed and as a result are found in much greater numbers than those on the arid Western Eyre Peninsula where they seek Coastal Sea Stacks and high cliff lines for their nest sites. These are distinct and crucial differences in why Eyre Peninsula which is the Southern most range of the species nest sites continue to fail. Also eastern Species migrate while western species do not. They are sedentary and therefore more reliant on permanent nesting sites which result in such spectacularly large nests often hundreds of years old, rebuilt and repaired prior to each breeding season. It is also the reason they have been exposed over two hundred years to human interference resulting in very few breeding pairs now left in Southern Australia specifically Western Eyre Peninsula. In terms of surfing some of the best waves are at the base oh these Stacks and results in interactions but for the most part the nest sites have survived due to the activity being below the nest sites although increasing numbers, car parks etc do put pressure on these sites. Drone photography has come on so quickly that I'm sure operators have little idea of how critical a threat this activity is to a predator that relies on holding the high ground is. There is really no middle ground with Drones around the few remaining active nest sites left on the Eyre Peninsula. I'm sure photographers have the best intentions in recording the coastline but they need to accept that this could literally be the last straw for the cumulative human negative interactions over Two Centuries. Surfers also have a positive role to play by organising and informing the wider community and themselves and look for a way forward in protecting these magnificent birds. We are custodians as we share their habitat. Let's keep it positive.

Middy

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 1:19am

Thanks Middy great information.

Alternate nest sites :
Primary nest – the most frequently used nest within a territory.
Alternate nest – one of sometimes several nest-structures within
a territory.

Selection of nesting sites:
Continuous use of one favoured nesting site was apparent in most territories monitored, with new nests, or relocation to a nearby alternate site recorded infrequently (n = 7 of 164 records); alternate sites were <200 m distant from the favoured nesting
site in each case. Three territories had tree nests, one was completely sheltered inside a cave opening on a vertical cliff-face and the rest were on ledges of cliffs, ranging in height
from ~8 to ~110 m above mean sea-level. All but one nest were
<250 m (horizontally) inland, and visible from the sea; the exception was situated on a cliff ledge in a steep watercourse
~350 m inland.

Effects of human disturbance on productivity of White-bellied
Sea-Eagles (Haliaeetus leucogaster)pdf

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw05FEULJCyHbkp6Rmh5dGw4bmc/view?usp=dr...

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barley commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 12:25am

I have asked jesse about the illegality of flying drones there and he said he could not find within CASA, rules not permitting him to fly there..then again, what photographer obeys the rules when they want to get 'the shot'.

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 1:53am

Barley the attitude of some drone photographers seems to be blase, in denial, that simply they must stop droning there .
It is most certainly illegal and wildlife officers know only too well. .

"It’s also worth considering that evidence shows animals are physically affected by a drone’s presence, and the technology is banned in all US National Parks due to its impact on wildlife, especially birds nesting birds of prey."

https://theconversation.com/when-eagles-scare-there-are-other-ways-to-st...

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw05FEULJCyHQmVXLWNUNlVTQXc/view?usp=dr...

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 1:36am

General Distribution.
On the Australian continent the majority of the Osprey population is found across the northern tropical and subtropical regions, where high population densities occur, extending southward through temperate climes where they are more sparsely distributed along the southern coastline (Marchant and Higgins 1993, Johnstone and Storr 1998, Barrett et al. 2003, Dennis et al.
2011).
With a scarcity of permanent inland lakes and major rivers over much of Australia, Osprey breeding habitat
is primarily confined to coastal areas, including along estuaries to their tidal limit (Marchant and Higgins 1993).
Despite apparent suitable habitat along the southeast coast of the continent, there is a broad gap in the breeding
range (Fig. 1) that extends from southern New South Wales (below 35u309S) westward to the southern coastline of Kangaroo Island (35u509S, 137u159E) in South Australia
(Barrett et al. 2003, DSEWPC 2010, Debus 2012).
This distribution gap is not well understood, but may reflect
the apparent adaptation of this subspecies to specific bio-climatic factors (Dennis 2007a).
From Kangaroo Island westward there is a small geographically isolated subpopulation of 55–60 pairs in South
Australia, which are likely on the edge of the species’ optimal range, where their persistence may be associated with
prevailing mild climatic conditions (Dennis et al. 2011).
The marine and near-shore environment in this region is
episodically influenced by the warm-water Leeuwin Current, which originates in the tropical western Pacific region, from where it flows southwest through the Indonesian Archipelago into the Indian Ocean (Johnstone et al.
2013). The current then sweeps south along the outer
continental shelf off Western Australia, then east into the
Great Australian Bight, where it provides a climate-tempering influence to the otherwise cold southern ocean waters
(Butler et al. 2002). This current, and the sheltered foraging areas available in extensive shallow warm-water bays
and gulfs of the region’s coastline, combine to provide habitat suited to this subspecies (Dennis 2007a).

And in southern
temperate regions (South Australia, 34u–36uS), egg-laying
occurs from mid-August to early October (Dennis 2007b).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw05FEULJCyHQmVXLWNUNlVTQXc/view?usp=dr...

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 1:57am

http://www.naturalresources.sa.gov.au/kangarooisland/news/171025-steerin...

Ms Paterson said that they detract from the quality of experience provided in our parks, can be a risk to other visitors and also disturb wildlife.
“There is concern that drones being flown over nesting grounds are having a negative impact on white-bellied sea eagles and ospreys during their breeding season.
“Kangaroo Island’s threatened coastal raptors are particularly sensitive to disturbance during the breeding season, it is important to avoid locations they inhabit as much as possible, both within parks and on private nesting grounds.
“If these birds are disturbed they may fly up from their nest, leaving eggs or chicks exposed to the elements and predators, which may be fatal.

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 2:05am

https://www.pressreader.com/canada/vancouver-sun/20170403/281711204494984

Overlooked has been the ban on flying within 75 metres of animals. And in case anyone should have any doubts about this, birds are animals.
As we approach nesting season on the West Coast, it’s particularly important to get the word out that flying drones near birds and their nests is not allowed.

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 2:55am

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2008-06-02/osprey-protection-zone-for-sa/2...

Osprey protection zone for SA
UPDATED MON 2 JUN 2008.

An exclusion zone has been set up around rare osprey nests on South Australia's west coast.
Bob Minnican, from the Friends of Sceale Bay, says the group has successfully lobbied to help protect endangered ospreys that have been in the area for more than 200 years.
He says the noise of jet skis near the nests has a detrimental effect on the habitat.
Mr Minnican says there is now a hefty penalty for anyone caught breaking the law.
"It's a maximum $10,000 fine and two years in jail, so it's a very significant penalty," he said.
"I think that's done because these are an endangered species that's been listed.
"These are non-migratory birds, there's probably less than 50 pair(s) in South Australia, most of them on the Eyre Peninsula, so they're very significant and they are under threat like all these other shore birds."

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trippergreenfeet commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 11:18am

From CASA's Can I Fly Here page https://casa.dronecomplier.com/external regarding drone flights at Cummings Monument ...type in Cummings Monument in the search bar, site defaults to Darwin.

e wrote: Flight Restrictions:

You are permitted to fly here provided you follow the standard conditions outlined by CASA.
Do not exceed 120 metres (400FT) above ground level.

The ‘Can I fly there?’ app covers aviation rules about where you can and can’t fly your drone to ensure the safety of manned aircraft and people on the ground.

Check before you fly! There may be other rules you must comply with, such as local government/council rules, national parks and privacy.

Flying at the monument finally comes down to local regs above and beyond CASA for this site.

I'd rather be poor and produce nothing than be an arsehole and conquer the world - Alby Falzon

What time do you like the best? The time on the kitchen wall, or the time it takes to smoke a cigarette? - Sidewinder

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middy commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 12:20pm

Just looked at some of the instagram sites eddiewouldgo posted. It's pretty clear that there is little to no understanding by most people of the level of disturbance taking place around Osprey nest sites and particularly the Cummins Monument Sea Stack nest site. The problem stems initially from it being a Tourist coastal viewing site and a popular surfing location. The constant stream of human activity has to be managed to mitigate disturbances. Even standing on the cliff overlooking the nest can cause failure as a breeding site. Behaviour such as the birds circling and screeching while nesting are immediate indications that they feel threatened. The various Drone footage shows flights by numerous operators around and directly over the nest. There are numerous failed nesting sites spread along the West Coast that correspond with a cliff line higher than the nest. I have seen the failure of both Primary and secondary sites further West due to increased numbers of people and increased human activity. There are different thresholds for each sites but Jet skis and Drones by their ability to access and disturb are well documented. There is a lot of data and studies both nationally and internationally that record this. eddiewouldgo is posting those studies by ornithologists directly relating to Australia and South Australia directly. The problem is how can this be communicated to the Public including Surfers and Surf related activities. Interpretive Signage and fencing would be the starting point but this can only happen through collaboration between local community users including the Drone Operators, the relevant state government department which is the Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Local Government. There are Parks and Wildlife Offices with Rangers in Both Pt. Lincoln and Streaky Bay. These would be starting points in working towards a resolution to preserving the nest. The size of the actual nest in one of the instagram photos indicates it could well have been there in Pre European times. This isn't about being a killjoy but addressing what needs to be done to give these species to continue to survive.

Middy

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trippergreenfeet commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 12:55pm

While living in WA I assisted in the relocation of three pairs of Ofspray in the Mandurah region. This was in 2006/7 when there was whole scale land clearing by Mirvac Finni at the time for housing development on the Peel Inlet side and ocean side between Erskine and Wannanup, and past the Dawesville Cut ... MF were brutal about that task but that's another story for another discussion.

The job was bigger than Ben Hur ... first up was the capture of the birds which is no easy feat when they are 20m off the ground. Once captured a crane was used to access and take the nest with a metre or two of the tree itself. Then the nest itself was attached to a twenty metre pole and platform concreted in the ground at locations in the A Class reserve at Lake Clifton.
Poor results in the end, one pair stayed together and bread the next season, second pair were never seen again and the third had the female die from what was thought to be shock. The male hung about the nest for a couple of months then never to be seen again.
Total cost was nearly 100k for that job ...
I went back recently and while there I checked out the nest sites to see if any new pairs had taken up residence ... no luck as the fires a few years ago had destroyed the platforms .

As usual the general public have no idea/show no care to the sensitivity of large Raptors ... getting the right shot or footage for an ego boost is far more important to these people than long term care for wildlife.
Once it's gone it's gone forever... these same crew will sit back in the future and reminisce of how great it was when the big birds were so close but not realising the direct connection they played in the birds demise ... all for 2:30 of an ego stroke.

I'd rather be poor and produce nothing than be an arsehole and conquer the world - Alby Falzon

What time do you like the best? The time on the kitchen wall, or the time it takes to smoke a cigarette? - Sidewinder

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 10:51pm

Casa didn't know there was an osprey nest did they trippergreenfert ...that needs to be changed on the website !

Leo Cummings memorial pictured here:
https://goo.gl/images/r69aP2

"Located 60 km south of Elliston on the coast is a monument to Leo Cummings, a local who was drowned when his crayfishing boat was wrecked at the site in 1959. The importance of this lookout is that offers uninterrupted views of Point Drummond and superb views up and down the coast. The sign at the monument explains the sad story of Leo Cummings: "On 29 June 1959, near Eagles Nest, the fishing cutter 'Wangaree' was wrecked whilst retrieving craypots with the loss of crew member Leo (Lew) Cummings. The other two crew members, skipper Eric Tapley and son Barry made it ashore and were later rescued. The boat became stricken when a craypot buoy line fouled the propellor. Efforts to free the propellor were unsuccessful and when the anchor parted, the cutter was brought ashore by the sea where it struck a reef. The crew sent a radio message before jumping overboard where they struggled against strong undertow currents. Barry made it ashore, but re-entered the water to help his father who was in difficulty and successfully brought him ashore. Barry once again entered the water to help Leo who was also having difficulties, but Leo disappeared before he could get to him. Despite intensive and risky searches over the next few days in Barry was again instrumental, Leo's body was never found."

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timcosh commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 8:38pm

As a keen observer over the years of nature and change around the Cummins area I have noticed an increased amount of activity there. It would be a great pity if we as the current generation of surfers or visitors changed the natural process of these magnificent birds. It starts and ends with us. Informing others is really important.

I have enjoyed the birds while chasing waves and have found my binoculars very handy. They allow me to stealthily view from a distance without causing a disturbance. They have also helped me locate and identify other interesting things over the years such as whales, dolphins and empty waves. We all have a responsibility to conserve the present.

If saying No to oil in the bight was important to you then you understand that why this issue needs addressing.

As much as it is an experience to locate and view the nest from above we have to realise those days of minimal impact are over. This is because far far more surfers are frequenting the area. This is FACT. Things are not what they once were. To all people who frequent the area it is our responsibility to make the change. If you know someone who is going to go check it out too close have the courage to inform them politely of the cons to their behaviour. If you like walking right above, buy some binoculars and change your habits. I know Its out dated in thinking every one will listen but if the majority do it will lessen the impact and keep the birds around.

Cummins without these birds wouldn't be Cummins, so lets keep it special. Its something to be proud of in a funny South Australian way. Locals aren't assholes they just notice and care about things not everyone knows about. Like any local, things around the home are important to them. It's not a them vs us mentality every time one of them brings up the coast, rather a call out for visitors and locals to be responsible for now and the future. We need to think before we act. We don't need more rules and regulations or fences to tell us what we already know is right. It is pointless arguing over the birds and the threat they face. We as visitors to their area are responsible regardless wether they flourish or fail. And we will be remembered for it.

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trippergreenfeet commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 9:10pm

@eddie wonder what happened to the 2008 list of occupied nest that the Friends of Sceale Bay worked on ... why didn't CASA consult that I wonder?

I'd rather be poor and produce nothing than be an arsehole and conquer the world - Alby Falzon

What time do you like the best? The time on the kitchen wall, or the time it takes to smoke a cigarette? - Sidewinder

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eddiewouldgo commented Saturday, 4 Nov 2017 at 10:30pm

Hi TGF , does this answer your question?

The Chain of Bays coastline is one of the few remaining areas in South Australia, along with Kangaroo Island, where the Osprey is breeding successfully. Due to the lack of tall trees, nesting sites in South Australia are confined to remote cliffs and coastal island stacks, where the birds construct large mounds of sticks, which are decorated with seaweed, kelp and marine debris during the breeding season, which occurs in Spring, between September and October. The nest selection period prior to breeding, from July to September, is also critical to the breeding success. A number of potential nests exist within a breeding territory, and a breeding pair will select one of these in each season. Ospreys have also been known to establish nests atop power-poles and even the masts of boats, where these features are left undisturbed. Eggs are hatched after five weeks, and fledging occurs after two months in the nest, in December or January. Birds may live for 20-25 years.
Raptor expert Terry Dennis has surveyed the Chain of Bays coastline and he has determined that up to eight active breeding territories exist in the region, making it critical for the survival of this species in South Australia. The geographically varied coastline of the Chain of Bays provides ideal feeding habitat in a range of wind conditions, and the isolated cliffs provide suitable nesting sites. Terry Dennis has recommended a number of management strategies for the protection of this species, including reduced disturbance pressures, especially from above the nest sites, and significant development buffers, in the order of 1000 meters, from nesting territories.

http://www.chainofbays.com.au/index.php?page=35

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eddiewouldgo commented Sunday, 5 Nov 2017 at 12:44am

When the wilderness quality of remote coastlines is diminished, the habitat and survival of sensitive wildlife
species can be seriously threatened,
Eagles for example, require large foraging territories and nest site sanctity with surrounding wilderness as
buffer areas, for successful breeding.
Both the Osprey and the white-bellied sea eagle have recently been listed as “Endangered” in South Australia .

Dr Olsen is also concerned for the habitats of Osprey in South Australia, since these are part of the
southern-most osprey populations in Australia, and the world.
Osprey are not found in Victoria or Tasmania.

Records of Ospreys from throughout
Australia suggest that the South Australian Osprey population is significantly isolated from the west and east coast populations, and there is no doubt South Australia supports the major population across the southern Australian coast.
Ospreys in South Australia almost invariably breed on rock stacks or cliffs overlooking the sea, often in positions that are inaccessible from the ground.
Both the male and female take part in the building or rebuilding of the nest, and some pairs use the same nest site year after year, adding more sticks each year until the nests become very large structures indeed.
The nests are often lined with seaweed.
The female usually incubates the eggs and is fed by the male, who may also take a minimal share of incubation (which takes 34-36 days).
In Europe and North America, Osprey
numbers have declined seriously since
the 1950s.
Much of this decline can be
attributed to the effects of pesticides such as DDT, which accumulates in the birds' bodies and causes the production of eggs with too-thin shells.
Since DDT has been banned in much of the Northern Hemisphere, Osprey populations seem to be making a spectacular recovery. In much of Australia the problem does not
appear to have been as great, but this is no cause for complacency as the relatively small numbers of breeding Ospreys in South Australia are still extremely vulnerable to this type of disturbance.

[PDF] South Australia's offshore islands - Department of Environment, Water and ...
https://www.environment.sa.gov.au › assets

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eddiewouldgo commented Sunday, 5 Nov 2017 at 1:28am

Changing nest sites ;
"Ospreys have re-occupied primary nest sites in some areas despite displacement to alternative sites
following disturbance or increased human activity (Dennis 2004).
For example, ospreys have returned after development of cliff-top walkway and tourist lookout at Cape Bauer
in 2000, and after site-works and residence construction at Searcy Bay in 2003".

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eddiewouldgo commented Sunday, 5 Nov 2017 at 3:41pm

Just in news.... Apparently last week
2 Ospreys were in the nest there at cummings , and were photographed from a distance mind you and not above the nest .
There might be chicks in the nest now.

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 5:12pm

Tubeshooter , did the osprey eat the budgie ?
They are a fish-eating raptor so its unlikely !

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 5:15pm

'There is evidence for regional decline in South Australia where former territories at locations in the Spencer Gulf and along the lower Murray River have been vacant for decades.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the main threats to osprey populations were egg collectors and hunting of the adults along with other birds of prey, but osprey populations declined drastically in many areas in the 1950s and 1960s; this appeared to be in part due to the toxic effects of insecticides such as DDT on reproduction. The pesticide interfered with the bird's calcium metabolism which resulted in thin-shelled, easily broken or infertile eggs. Possibly because of the banning of DDT in many countries in the early 1970s, together with reduced persecution, the osprey, as well as other affected bird of prey species, have made significant recoveries. In South Australia, nesting sites on the Eyre Peninsula and Kangaroo Island are vulnerable to unmanaged coastal recreation and encroaching urban development.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osprey

"The call is a series of sharp whistles, described as cheep, cheep or yewk, yewk. If disturbed by activity near the nest, the call is a frenzied cheereek!"

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 5:17pm

There are a number of mitigation strategies that can reduce social conflict associated with the Osprey. These include:
Ensure the availability of nest sites (large dead trees or similar artificial structures) with a buffer zone. (As a minimum 100m for low sites, less for high towers).
Identify and protect regular feeding areas, perch (feeding) trees and nest material collection sites, particularly vegetation surrounding nest trees.
Consider direct and indirect impacts on the species and its habitat in planning processes including adequate field survey to identify nest trees, buffer protection zone, perch trees and feeding areas.
Implement or continue programs monitoring the breeding status of the species across its range incorporating surveys of the number of active nest trees, breeding success at nests and protection of buffer zones and nest trees. Monitoring should be undertaken for a minimum of 5 years. Reassessment of the need to monitor sites can be made after this time.
Undertake community awareness initiatives such as media campaigns, brochures and interpretive signs.
These should cover issues such as the threat of discarding fish with fishing tackle attached, protection of potential and future nest trees.
Initiate or continue ecological research to determine whether availability of potential nest trees and/or food resources are limiting to the species as well as potential impacts of pesticides and pollutants on the species’ breeding success.
Work with managers of infrastructure to minimise the risks to Osprey feeding and/or nesting habitats and resources. This may include relocating infrastructure to avoid nest sites, particularly in cases where long term existing nests occur or installing artificial nesting or roost sites to replace natural sites that need to be removed. As a last resort, new nests constructed on existing or new infrastructure may be moved to artificial nest sites if there is a threat to the birds or the infrastructure.

http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.pl?taxo...

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 5:20pm

We have received several reports of drones being flown in parks, especially on Kangaroo Island and Eyre Peninsula” Mr Ellis said.

“This increase in drone use is a result of changing technology, affordability of the devices and the desire to film and photograph native fauna in their natural environment.

“Flying a drone or any remotely piloted aircraft in a park poses a very real hazard to native fauna, especially our nesting threatened coastal raptors like the white-bellied sea eagle and eastern osprey.

“If these birds are disturbed they may not return to their nests, resulting in the death of their chicks.

“Drones are also a potential nuisance because they impact on the privacy and enjoyment of visitors."

http://www.naturalresources.sa.gov.au/kangarooisland/news/Drone-regulati...

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 5:28pm

'Protecting threatened species, like the osprey, is one reason private drones are banned in national parks.'
"We have received several reports of drones being flown in parks, especially on the Eyre Peninsula and Kangaroo Island," DEWNR regional programs director Grant Pelton said.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-20/councils-clamp-down-on-use-of-d...

"Flying a drone, or any remotely piloted aircraft, in a park presents a potential nuisance because they impact on the privacy and enjoyment of visitors, but they can also pose a very real hazard to native fauna.
"We have even had reports of drones disturbing nesting birds such as ospreys, which are a threatened species.
If these birds are disturbed, they may not return to their nests, resulting in the death of their chicks.
"It is therefore vital that we are able to regulate the use of drones in parks to protect our native fauna as well as the community.

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 5:33pm

A DRONE that forced a pair or parent ospreys to leave their nest and their chick has been caught on camera.
Wellington Point resident Paul Harper lives near osprey nest and caught the drone hovering near the nest — forcing the parents away from it and their baby. “It certainly caused some concern for them, the adults just kept circling the nest and didn’t come back for some time,” Mr Harper said. He said he was not sure if the controller was trying to harass the birds or film them.
But anyone would know that flying a drone around the nest would cause them distress, so the person who did it is either arrogant or ignorant about wildlife,” he said.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/questnews/southeast/camera-catches-drone-s...

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middy commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 6:38pm

Not a lot of response Eddie. I hope all surfers across Australia including photographers and Professional surfers who make their living surfing remote locations and having it filmed are digesting the information you are providing. timcosh this forum began with South Australia's foremost expert on coastal Raptors pointing out that intervention such as closing Walking Trails in breeding season is mandatory. The issue apart from Drones is people overlooking the nest site. If they have no idea of the threat this poses for nesting Ospreys then they will continue to do it. That's why I suggested interpretive signage as this gives information about the species and educates visitors. You also need to directly address the issue of people walking to the top of the cliff overlooking the Nest. Cummins Lookout is a Tourism Attraction not just a surf ing location. I've done the Drive along the coast many times and always stop there for a break. Most of the time there were no surfers there because the conditions were not suitable. How do you inform visitors when there is no one there. There is a road and a car park but nothing to give visitors interesting information relating to European, Indigenous and Natural Heritage which would be a great way to address the Ospreys. Doing nothing does not seem a viable option and it does take effort. The local surfers have to be the catalyst and initiators to bring about some strategy.

Middy

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eddiewouldgo commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 7:11pm

Middy said:::
"Just looked at some of the instagram sites eddiewouldgo posted. It's pretty clear that there is little to no understanding by most people of the level of disturbance taking place around Osprey nest sites and particularly the Cummins Monument Sea Stack nest site. The problem stems initially from it being a Tourist coastal viewing site and a popular surfing location. The constant stream of human activity has to be managed to mitigate disturbances. Even standing on the cliff overlooking the nest can cause failure as a breeding site. Behaviour such as the birds circling and screeching while nesting are immediate indications that they feel threatened. The various Drone footage shows flights by numerous operators around and directly over the nest. There are numerous failed nesting sites spread along the West Coast that correspond with a cliff line higher than the nest. I have seen the failure of both Primary and secondary sites further West due to increased numbers of people and increased human activity. There are different thresholds for each sites but Jet skis and Drones by their ability to access and disturb are well documented. There is a lot of data and studies both nationally and internationally that record this. eddiewouldgo is posting those studies by ornithologists directly relating to Australia and South Australia directly. The problem is how can this be communicated to the Public including Surfers and Surf related activities. Interpretive Signage and fencing would be the starting point but this can only happen through collaboration between local community users including the Drone Operators, the relevant state government department which is the Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Local Government. There are Parks and Wildlife Offices with Rangers in Both Pt. Lincoln and Streaky Bay. These would be starting points in working towards a resolution to preserving the nest. The size of the actual nest in one of the instagram photos indicates it could well have been there in Pre European times. This isn't about being a killjoy but addressing what needs to be done to give these species to continue to survive."
Middy.

Well said Middy you really know your osprey !
The rangers are aware of this and it could take time for something to be done at the site .... In the meantime spreading awareness to the general public and convincing the potential drone users is the message here.
Its been a hot topic on some regular drone / surfer associated instagram accounts for months but it seems some of the persons think they are going to decide if they fly their drone if they think its ok ;...if the osprey isn't to be seen...or flying above the surfers a little bit away from the nest. Get the awesome photo...no worries?
With summer time ahead more drones will be there flying unless they are aware or told its not permitted.
Because as yet theres only very old faded signs from decades ago..when it was less frequently used.
You would think surfers would be quick to understand and hopefully Everyone agrees... No drones in the area of the both two nest sites.

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freeride76 commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 7:45pm

Good luck gents.
It was interesting to hear about the different populations and abundances between east coast and SA.
Here in Ballina there are two artificial nest sites (at least) that all seem to be occupied by breeding ospreys.
And a natural tree nest in the mangrove swamp near an artificial lake that is full of mullet, whiting, gar and herring.
Beautiful to watch them hunting and listen to them calling to each other.

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middy commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 8:17pm

Glad to see you are following free ride yeh they are a charismatic bird not an eagle but a cousin. Sounds u live in a beautiful spot. Can't help being effected when you are surrounded by nature.

Middy

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freeride76 commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 8:25pm

I wonder what the range of white-bellied sea eagles is, I see them here from time to time...but not frequently.

btw, for anyone who crosses the Tweed River bridge, there is an artificial nest with osprey parents and chicks on the west side of the bridge, south bank of the river.
If you are travelling south, look to the west as you reach the NSW side and you'll look straight into the nest.

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tubeshooter commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 10:55pm

Again I certainly don't condone flying a drone near any nesting bird , yet alone a bird of prey. And I wasn't aware the southern species were so different .But for arguments sake alone it would seem to me the populations down there have been in trouble before drones , or at least regular use of them . Land clearing and pesticides have been presented as concerns so far , as has their migratory habits, could there be others?
To that not all populations on the east coast migrate , and seem quite content working around people. You have me curious as to why the South Ozpreys are declining as a whole , given that few of their nesting sites would be affected by drone use.
www.bigvolcano.com.au/stories/ospreys/ospreys.htm
https://www.echo.net.au/2011/11/fishing-line-kills-threatened-osprey/
simple things like discarded fishing line etc need to need to addressed too. cheers

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timcosh commented Monday, 6 Nov 2017 at 10:55pm

I agree with this point of view. Do what needs to be done. The times have changed and at the end of the day I want a positive outcome for these birds. I have enjoyed reading these posts and the detailed information provided. A chance to learn something new and hopefully a positive step forward for the area. Signage and area protection are needed. All the best to the birds and local communities involved. Keep up the good work.

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Blowin commented Tuesday, 7 Nov 2017 at 5:44am

Fuck signage.

The world is full of that visual pollution. The crew flying the drones are well aware of the issue , to the point they are claiming to be bullied about it on social media .

Don't give those with the power an excuse or it'll look like the parks around where I'm at right now.

Signs , coppers logs , signs , coppers logs , signs.

Fuckers try to turn the bush into a museum.

Natural is best.

Long live the ospreys. Amazing creatures.